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Old 12-19-2018, 03:17 PM   #1
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Marlon vs Bronze seacocks

My 30 year old Taiwanese Trawler, is in need of new seacocks. Several are frozen closed (not those for the engine cooling or generator).

The current bronze seacocks are bonded, but I was wondering what is the general consensus(as if that exists)? We had Marlon seacocks on our old sailboat, and they performed as we’ll after 29 years as when new, with the added advantage that bonding wasn’t necessary.

I’d like to replace the seacocks when I haul out early 2019 to paint the bottom.
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Old 12-19-2018, 03:38 PM   #2
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I replaced a thru hull and seacock and replaced with bronze thru hull and marelon seacock, with a diverter valve above the marelon fitting for salt water wash down/toilet water supply through the same thru hull. My only concern is that it not be in a place where it would be subjected to contact that might break or damage the fitting. If it's in an out of the way and protected place (as mine is) it should be fine. If exposed I would be concerned about it. JMO
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Old 12-19-2018, 04:52 PM   #3
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I'll use Marelon or Bronze above water. Below water, Bronze. I know that Marelon is NOT Nylon, but I've seen too many nylon through-hulls snap. The idea that a seacock could potentially snap with no means to stop the ingress of water is like a "Pucker Factor: 10" for me.
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Old 12-19-2018, 04:59 PM   #4
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Try beating on one with a sledge...it will convince you how tough they are.

The bottom of the boat is only cheap glass and polyester.... Lesser materials than the Marelon.
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:08 PM   #5
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I went thru all 16 sea cocks on my trawler. Most were frozen. In all I cleaned up and used all but one. The old style barrel ones will last longer than the boat.

https://www.practical-sailor.com/new...s-10447-1.html
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:13 PM   #6
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I went thru all 16 sea cocks on my trawler. Most were frozen. In all I cleaned up and used all but one. The old style barrel ones will last longer than the boat.

https://www.practical-sailor.com/new...s-10447-1.html
16?
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:20 PM   #7
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Marelon seacocks are well proven.
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Old 12-19-2018, 07:47 PM   #8
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Do you really need to replace the seacocks? What type of seacocks are they?

If they are tapered cone type they can probably be refurbished easily.

If they are ball valve seacocks you can probably just break them free and maybe grease them.

If they are the old Groco rubber plug style, replace them.

My two cents on seacock material, Iím not a fan of plastic seacocks. Iíve seen several of the stems that connect the ball to the handle break. Iím also not impressed with Foresparís customer service. To be fair my dislike of Forespar Customer Service goes back more than twenty years. They are probably better now or they would be out of business.

If you want plastic consider the ones distributed by Raritan. Sorry I canít remember the name but they are made in New Zeland.

My choice for a new Seacock would be Grocoís SBV US made bronze ball valve. seacock.
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Old 12-20-2018, 06:40 AM   #9
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"The idea that a seacock could potentially snap with no means to stop the ingress of water is like a "Pucker Factor: 10" for me."

A properly installed sea cock is BOLTED in place and does not require a thru hull to remain in place.

If you can jump on the sea cock it should be strong enough.

The tapered bronze are the best as the can be rebuilt multiple times with little effort, or expense.
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Old 12-20-2018, 11:01 AM   #10
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A CG and ABYC compliant seacock will take 500 lbs at right angles for 10 minutes applied to its extreme dimension. That doesn't mean you can't break it.

I see many installations of Marelon ball valves on top of a thru hull which people call a "seacock". It is not, and Forespar does not call that a seacock or make any representations for that installation. It does not meet any standard. The Marelon seacocks that are compliant are the integrated ones with a three corner bolted down base. These meet the CG and ABYC standards. They have another compliant line often seen in production boats but these are sold OEM only, not at any chandlers, though you can occasionally find them.
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Old 01-08-2019, 05:05 AM   #11
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Lots of plastic around the world yachts down this way have plastic thru hulls and plastic valves but I suspect itís about weight saving (and unlike most of our boats the hulls are too thin to accept a bolt). My understanding is that the off shore blue water and cat 1 boats also have to have wooden tapered bung attached to every under water thru hull to be compliant along with a collar (if plastic is used) to transfer the operating load over a wider area of the hull and reduce the load on the through hull. I could post a pic if anyoneís interested.
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Old 01-08-2019, 05:22 AM   #12
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While my experience with Marlon has been positive I used all Spartan bronze seacocks on my current boat. If you keep them greased with Spartan grease and pull them apart for a check, cleaning and grease every year or so they'll last a lifetime. Also I never leave the boat without closing all seacocks, not only might it prevent a calamity but it's good practice to exercise them frequently. I also keep appropriately sized wooden plugs attached somewhere handy by each seacock in the event of an unforeseen failure. Spartan bronze is right down the road apiece from me at Robinhood Marine and while expensive their stuff is top notch, actually made by local craftsmen.
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Old 01-08-2019, 06:51 AM   #13
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Spartan bronze is right down the road apiece from me at Robinhood Marine and while expensive their stuff is top notch, actually made by local craftsmen.
I've been there are seen their work. Absolutely top quality.

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Old 01-08-2019, 08:38 AM   #14
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I agree with 'are you sure you need to replace them?'
I thought some of mine were frozen - somebody smarter than me told me to pump the brakes and make sure they can't be serviced before replacing them.

Turns out, if they're the tapered cone variety (likely from the age of your boat), they are almost surely still serviceable. Take them apart when the boat is hauled. Get some lapping compound from spartan marine, and some of their seacock grease. Do them a service and you'll be golden for years. It'll take a lot less time & money than getting new ones.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:18 AM   #15
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"Take them apart when the boat is hauled. Get some lapping compound from spartan marine,"

A turn or so in the lock nut will usually allow the tapered bronze sea cock to be tapped loose enough to turn while afloat.

So what if it leaks for a few seconds.

Retighten the lock nut , and try to not operate the unit as the growth that jammed it may scratch the tapered bore.

Fine grade "valve grinding" compound is at most auto parts store, in a small tin.
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