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Old 03-18-2016, 07:31 AM   #21
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I don't doubt your posting but I would be VERY hesitant about applying any water based material or water itself to the OP's door, the inner portion of which is probably a veneered plywood of some type. As I mentioned in post #9, the veneer might be paper thin and any application of water will probably raise what little grain is there and subsequent sanding will wear through the veneer to the point of destruction of the surface.

Those pieces that are made of solid teak? No problem as any raised grain can be sanded down with no damage to the board.
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Old 03-18-2016, 07:44 AM   #22
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I don't doubt your posting but I would be VERY hesitant about applying any water based material or water itself to the OP's door, the inner portion of which is probably a veneered plywood of some type. As I mentioned in post #9, the veneer might be paper thin and any application of water will probably raise what little grain is there and subsequent sanding will wear through the veneer to the point of destruction of the surface.

Those pieces that are made of solid teak? No problem as any raised grain can be sanded down with no damage to the board.
I don't disagree...but that's what Interlux recommends.

I was mainly showing that a previously oil finish isn't all that bad, hard to work with if that's what the manufacturer recommends.

My teak was probably like the OPs and my PO had some ghoul slap some stuff that looks like redwood bench opaque finish over every inch of teak and it looked horrible.

If my teak looked that bad...I wouldn't worry about the veneer and try anything...just being prepared to put a new surface on it whether teak or not.
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Old 03-18-2016, 09:57 AM   #23
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The wood in the OP looks very red to me and the finish looks open grained like an oil finish might be. So if the photo is accurate you can't just clean the wood and finish it with any product. The color is going to have to be match first as well as match the finished used on the pictured wood.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:26 PM   #24
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I have had some success on my interior teak using a semi gloss varnish. I always found the oiled teak too dull a finish, and except for highlighting, my wife doesn't like a high gloss inside the boat. Preparation, as always, is the secret to success. Clean it thoroughly with a solvent soaked rag, you will be surprised how much of the dull finish is just oiled dirt and comes right off. Wetsanding with 200 or finer paper and varnish. one or sometimes two coats, depending on the quality of the varnish. A better quality will cover better.
For your table, I would use a high gloss varnish on the fiddles. For the doors, high gloss on the rails and stiles, semi on the panel. Of course you then need to do the rest of the interior to match, but you already knew that.
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Old 03-26-2016, 11:49 AM   #25
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Pgitug,

Nordic Tug's with teak interiors (newer NT's have moved to less expensive hardwoods) are oiled with Daly's Seafin Teak Oil. No veneers here, all solid teak. The way they finish them at the factory is to rub on several coats of Daly's, buffing between coats. 4-5 coats will come out with a smooth, satin finish. On going maintenance is a 50/50 mix of Daly's and Formby's Lemon Oil. For dusting, just use a rag with Formby's.

For areas that are really dried out, faded, or water stained, there are several ways to go. Get a bunch of tack cloths, cheese cloths, and clean white rags. Clean up the teak with a fine bronze wool or 220-320 wet-dry sand paper dampened with mineral spirits. Wipe it down then start applying the Daly's. You can put it on with a rag or use a chip brush to apply a thin coat of Daly's. Let the oil soak in at least overnight to 24 hours before a light buffing, then apply another coat. For interior surfaces, 3 coats is usually enough. I put about 5 costs on the interior steps. I originally used polyurethane on the interior steps, but after wear-and-tear, chips, water stains, I stripped all steps and went back to Daly's. The only place I use satin polyurethane is the thin panel on the fridge and the salon table top. With any kind of oiled wood, it's an ongoing maintenance process, but I look the look. If I had a professional crew to maintain the boat, maybe I would go with a Hinckley's-style interior varnish, but it ain't going to happen.
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Old 03-26-2016, 11:59 AM   #26
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Interesting ..
What does the Lemon oil do in the mix? I guess it mixes nicely w the oil based Daly's so would mix w any other oil based finish as well. Probably even colored paint so I'm curious how the lemon oil works. I see you're mixing in lots of lemon oil too.
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Old 03-26-2016, 06:27 PM   #27
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Pgitug,

Nordic Tug's with teak interiors (newer NT's have moved to less expensive hardwoods) are oiled with Daly's Seafin Teak Oil. No veneers here, all solid teak. The way they finish them at the factory is to rub on several coats of Daly's, buffing between coats. 4-5 coats will come out with a smooth, satin finish. On going maintenance is a 50/50 mix of Daly's and Formby's Lemon Oil. For dusting, just use a rag with Formby's.

For areas that are really dried out, faded, or water stained, there are several ways to go. Get a bunch of tack cloths, cheese cloths, and clean white rags. Clean up the teak with a fine bronze wool or 220-320 wet-dry sand paper dampened with mineral spirits. Wipe it down then start applying the Daly's. You can put it on with a rag or use a chip brush to apply a thin coat of Daly's. Let the oil soak in at least overnight to 24 hours before a light buffing, then apply another coat. For interior surfaces, 3 coats is usually enough. I put about 5 costs on the interior steps. I originally used polyurethane on the interior steps, but after wear-and-tear, chips, water stains, I stripped all steps and went back to Daly's. The only place I use satin polyurethane is the thin panel on the fridge and the salon table top. With any kind of oiled wood, it's an ongoing maintenance process, but I look the look. If I had a professional crew to maintain the boat, maybe I would go with a Hinckley's-style interior varnish, but it ain't going to happen.

Thanks for the info.
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Old 03-27-2016, 09:09 AM   #28
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My quess is the lemon oil thins the Daly's limiting a build up, helps to remove any dust, dirty oils (around cooking area, hand prints on cabinets), and it smells better. As an aside, my Trinka dink has teak trim and I apply 5 coats of buffed Daly's on the trim and the oars. Only problem with Daly's is that it's tough to find. West Marine used to carry it, but no longer. Can only find it online... $30 a quart with shipping.
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Old 03-27-2016, 11:03 AM   #29
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Puffin,
Thanks,
Interesting as I had build problems w Daly's on exterior apps in Alaska. I expect a product presented as an oil should not have build. That's the advantage of oil. You only put it on .. you never need to take it off.
When the build started I started mixing my own oil and I lost the build problem but gained much more of the usual oil problems. But the oil problems were easy to deal w in cool Alaska but probably wouldn't fly very well in the Florida sun. The worst problem I had was having to recoat so often (about every five weeks) and wanting to coat liberally I slobbered too much on adjoining surfaces.
The oil works very well on interior surfaces. Need to do that now.
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:36 AM   #30
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Pgitug,

Nordic Tug's with teak interiors (newer NT's have moved to less expensive hardwoods) are oiled with Daly's Seafin Teak Oil. No veneers here, all solid teak. The way they finish them at the factory is to rub on several coats of Daly's, buffing between coats. 4-5 coats will come out with a smooth, satin finish. On going maintenance is a 50/50 mix of Daly's and Formby's Lemon Oil. For dusting, just use a rag with Formby's.

For areas that are really dried out, faded, or water stained, there are several ways to go. Get a bunch of tack cloths, cheese cloths, and clean white rags. Clean up the teak with a fine bronze wool or 220-320 wet-dry sand paper dampened with mineral spirits. Wipe it down then start applying the Daly's. You can put it on with a rag or use a chip brush to apply a thin coat of Daly's. Let the oil soak in at least overnight to 24 hours before a light buffing, then apply another coat. For interior surfaces, 3 coats is usually enough. I put about 5 costs on the interior steps. I originally used polyurethane on the interior steps, but after wear-and-tear, chips, water stains, I stripped all steps and went back to Daly's. The only place I use satin polyurethane is the thin panel on the fridge and the salon table top. With any kind of oiled wood, it's an ongoing maintenance process, but I look the look. If I had a professional crew to maintain the boat, maybe I would go with a Hinckley's-style interior varnish, but it ain't going to happen.

This may sound too simple, but by what means do you use to "Buff" between coats on the interior teak?
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Old 04-17-2016, 02:59 PM   #31
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I use microfiber towels for almost everything. Applying finish, buffing, cleaning. Even removing haze from epoxy grout on tile. Costco has them in automotive but I've used Amazon for them for maybe 5 years.


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Old 04-17-2016, 03:04 PM   #32
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Today's home project - old Javanese teak chest that I cleaned up to give to our kids. IMPORTANT: dispose of oily rags or preserve in airtight container. Click image for larger version

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Old 04-18-2016, 08:07 AM   #33
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Pgitug,

"Buff" is just take a mushed up white painters rag (old t-shirts) and give the dried Daly's surface a good rub down. It will buff out to a nice smooth low luster sheen. Recommend you put on at least a couple of coats before any buffing.
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Old 04-18-2016, 11:56 AM   #34
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And while buffing won't put a lot of oil onto the rag, you still need to be careful with residue. I know someone (truly not me!) who washed oily rags, put the in the dryer, and started a house fire. Also know of someone who oiled a home deck, left the rags in a pile in the sun, and burned down the entire house.


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Old 04-18-2016, 03:30 PM   #35
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Today's home project - old Javanese teak chest that I cleaned up to give to our kids. IMPORTANT: dispose of oily rags or preserve in airtight container. Attachment 50853Attachment 50852


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Can you apply wood stain on doors that have been teak oiled?
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Old 04-18-2016, 05:19 PM   #36
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Can you apply wood stain on doors that have been teak oiled?
You could try. But the wood may not take the stain.

Try mixing the stain in with some oil.
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Old 04-19-2016, 05:02 AM   #37
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Egads, I just sand and BLO. You guys are crazy. Ok, I actually use my friend Bill Daly's SeaFin, but it's basically BLO.
While reading something else in a different forum I realized I misspoke - SeaFin is tung oil, not linseed oil. There are a variety of differences, with resistance to water (higher with tung oil) being important in this environment.


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Old 04-19-2016, 05:06 AM   #38
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You could try. But the wood may not take the stain.

Try mixing the stain in with some oil.
While stain doesn't penetrate very deep, anything that affects its uptake will affect the appearance. So if there's an old finish, it needs to be stripped chemically or physically (sanding and scraping) before stain is applied.


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Old 04-19-2016, 10:59 AM   #39
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While stain doesn't penetrate very deep, anything that affects its uptake will affect the appearance. So if there's an old finish, it needs to be stripped chemically or physically (sanding and scraping) before stain is applied.


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True. But depending on the look he's going for it's worth a shot before you go to all the trouble of stripping off the finish.
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