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Old 02-11-2018, 07:55 AM   #1
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How many bilge pumps

Well, Iíve been cleaning and getting ready for another great year of boating, I have been considering adding another bilge pump, I have one now, itís a great pump and has never let me down. How many pumps does a 65í Boat need, two/three? There were two engine driven pumps but they are inoperable, I had a 110v pump but I found out it was junk during my bilge cleaning fun. Well let the bullets fly
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:02 AM   #2
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How many pumps does a 65í Boat need, two/three?
How many near water tight bulk head areas do you have?
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:40 AM   #3
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None, its wide open from stem to stern. There was a bulkhead about 1/3 of the way back from the bow. I plan on rebuilding that.
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:29 AM   #4
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How many through hull ? I would ensure the number/capacity of the pump can cope with water ingress from these in case of need.

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Old 02-11-2018, 09:40 AM   #5
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You should have at least one more pump than you need to overcome the largest leak you hope never to have,
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Old 02-11-2018, 10:31 AM   #6
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Our boat came with one bilge pump located just above the stuffing box. All through hulls located in engine room. Limber hole through bulkhead is smaller diameter than through hulls. What were they thinking?

*Note to self* Install bilge pump of a size capable to keep up with broken through hull in engine room this year!
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Old 02-11-2018, 10:44 AM   #7
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How many bilge pumps

Quote:
Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
Our boat came with one bilge pump located just above the stuffing box. All through hulls located in engine room. Limber hole through bulkhead is smaller diameter than through hulls. What were they thinking?

*Note to self* Install bilge pump of a size capable to keep up with broken through hull in engine room this year!


Same here. Our 42í has two (what I would call small) Rule 2000s. Neither are place where the water collects and I worry able the true capacity and the ability for them to keep up should we clobber something with our props. I totally have the same note-to-self you do.

I plan to replace one with the small Whale IC that has the remote pickup to get to where the bow water puddles, then replace the one in the rudder area with a slightly larger one (the largest I can get that pumps thru a 1Ē tube). Finally add a new and much larger one between the motors that can really pump out quickly. That will a new thru hull and some decision making though.

Anyway, to the OP. The answer is that, within reason, you can never have too much. But donít expect the factory setup to be sufficient. Always upgrade if you can. The advice from others is good. Find one that makes you feel good that it is there.
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Old 02-11-2018, 11:09 AM   #8
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In an emergency, I would not rely on a 110V pump or an engine driven pump to keep my boat from sinking. They can be helpful, but DC is a more reliable power source.

There are really two services for bilge pumps: 1) To pump out minor leakages like from a prop shaft gland. 2) In an emergency pump out water as fast as it comes in or a least give you more time to find the source of the water and fix it.

The first type is often smallish, about 500 gph. The second type needs to be DC powered and big- 2,000 gph at least, maybe more for your 65' boat. This willl probably need dedicated DC circuit as it will draw 10-20 amps and big discharge hose. It's float switch should be mounted an inch or two higher than the smaller pump's.

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Old 02-11-2018, 11:43 AM   #9
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Our 34' tug has three. Each is 2000 gph.

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Old 02-11-2018, 11:50 AM   #10
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Don’t forget that all these pumps lose significant performance when pumping uphill. I forget the numbers but a 2000 will only pump 2000 if the voltage is perfect, the outlet is horizontal and the intake is perfectly clear. Also, Seaflo are significantly cheaper than Rule so you can buy lots of them and wire them everywhere water might collect.

Consider also your strategy. If you find it difficult to move in your bilge or are not too handy, consider the bilge pump a delaying tactic (like fire extinguishers on fibreglass boats) to give to adequate time to abandon ship safely.
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Old 02-11-2018, 11:59 AM   #11
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Looking at the charts which only go up to 40 to 45í boats, which recommend 2000 to 4000 gph, I would be looking in the 6000 gph area. Make sure that they have wire for a 3% voltage drop and smooth bore discharge hose.
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Old 02-11-2018, 12:33 PM   #12
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Personally to have experienced the usefulness of them I will say that you will never have enough and having more than enough cannot be bad thing

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Old 02-11-2018, 05:01 PM   #13
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We have 3 on a 30 ft cruiser. 2 auto, 1 switched. Plus a manual pump. Plus a bucket. Rule #1: Keep the water out.
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:49 PM   #14
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Our 42 foot boat has four 1500-2000 gph bilge pumps. As far as I know, this was the factory set up. All factory wired with switches and fuses outside of the 12v main buss.

We also have a 120 v portable crash pump.
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Old 02-11-2018, 06:56 PM   #15
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And what about staged pump like a 800g/h then higher a bigger one and then a bigger one etc or is the opposite better? Or is all staged same better? Or I am just out of my mind

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Old 02-11-2018, 06:59 PM   #16
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Generally the smaller pump goes lower as it can pump out to a lower level than a larger pump can. Mount the larger pump a bit higher so if the small pump canít keep up the larger pump will come online and hopefully take care of it.
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:00 PM   #17
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On our 60 fter we have 3 x 350gph with floats at different heights.
We also have 3 spares in parts locker.
Also, in place ready to go, just need plugging in and switch flicked are two of these that supposedly can do 1800gph
https://www.bunnings.com.au/ozito-35...-pump_p4816179

We could also divert deck wash and raw water pumps but I think if they were needed its probably time to think about stepping up into the dinghy anyway.
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:33 PM   #18
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I have 3 x 2000 gph Rule pumps. The boat has 3 partial bulkheads, and there is one pump in the lazarette, one almost mid-ship in the ER and one further forward at the low point of the bilge. Alongside the latter is a 4 gph diaphragm pump which can run dry if needed but also gets water level down to about 1/4".

I would like a high capacity pump as well but have not sourced anything as yet. Perhaps something like this pool pump, 2" outlet, which is almost 8000 gph?
https://poolandspawarehouse.com.au/s...-warranty.html
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:47 PM   #19
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An interesting read on bilge pumps for a Navy 44'

Flooding vs bilge pumps

Quote:
If a Navy 44 has a 1.5 in diameter hole at 3.5 feet below the water line (speedo thru-hull) it will experience a 82.4 gal/min influx of water.
82.4 X 60 min = 4,944 gph

I know the Navy has a table for size of hole, depth of hole below water and inflow but I'm not able to find it.
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:06 PM   #20
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From US Navy Salvor's Handbook

With apologies to the metric system users in the rest of the world.....
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