Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-21-2019, 06:11 PM   #1
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,175
How I Fixed The Bungs on a Teak Deck

I was cleaning out my photos and came across these:

Basically, if your bungs are failing and therefore possibly leaking into the core of the decks, they need to be replaced. Another issue is thin decks; after years of teak cleaners and sanding they are thin enough that the screw heads are very close to the surface. If the decks still have some thickness, you can drill the holes deeper and reset the fasteners.

One of the problems with teak decks is the use of stainless fasteners. If you enclose them such that 02 can't get at them, then get them wet, they will bleed a black liquid that will stain the decks. My solution was to change the fasteners to bronze, which is entirely your discretion if you wish to reuse the old screws as you will be re-sealing the holes...

The first picture shows the bung I wish to change. Its not as bad as many of the others were, for sure, this one could have been left. The rest is pretty self-explanatory. I'll post the rest of the photos anon. Oh, that's the small blade on a Swiss Army knife, that's all I used.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060660.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	162.4 KB
ID:	84499   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060661.jpg
Views:	116
Size:	163.3 KB
ID:	84500   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060662.jpg
Views:	117
Size:	145.9 KB
ID:	84501   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060664.jpg
Views:	115
Size:	147.1 KB
ID:	84505  
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
What are we offended about today?
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2019, 01:11 AM   #2
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,175
I used a nice Lee Valley drill that was wood-screw-shaped and also had a countersink. I used white waterproof glue to set the screw in and the same glue to set the bung. The final picture is me using a Japanese pull-saw to cut the set bung flush. You can see that no sanding is required (remember you are doing this job because the decks are too thin).

That's it, except for seams, which I did not photograph.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060665.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	147.9 KB
ID:	84514   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060666.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	123.9 KB
ID:	84515   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060667.jpg
Views:	108
Size:	157.1 KB
ID:	84516   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060678.jpg
Views:	112
Size:	130.4 KB
ID:	84517   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1060669.jpg
Views:	109
Size:	174.4 KB
ID:	84518  

__________________

__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
What are we offended about today?
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2019, 05:24 AM   #3
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 678
Nice tutorial XS. Thank you. What are your thoughts on removing the bung and screw, countersinking as you did, but filling with epoxy using a syringe instead of reinstalling the screw. Then pop in the bung. The epoxy would probably do a fine job of holding the teak in place and provide a better seal.
Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2019, 07:30 AM   #4
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 19,145
"The epoxy would probably do a fine job of holding the teak in place and provide a better seal."


Perhaps but it will destroy the planking when a leak requires its removal.


Dipping the bung in varnish will seal it and they can usually be removed by driving a screw into the center.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 06:16 AM   #5
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
I was cleaning out my photos and came across these:

The first picture shows the bung I wish to change. Its not as bad as many of the others were, for sure, this one could have been left.
Have to ask, what was wrong/happening with that bung? Was it leaking? Taking longer to dry than others after wetting? Looks good from my house but my house is a long way from your boat . I do see a slightly thicker surround but...???
__________________
Hal
BLACK EYED SUSAN
Grand Banks 42 Classic
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 07:05 AM   #6
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 7,825
A good Canuck should use Roberts head screws.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 07:28 AM   #7
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"The epoxy would probably do a fine job of holding the teak in place and provide a better seal."


Perhaps but it will destroy the planking when a leak requires its removal.


Dipping the bung in varnish will seal it and they can usually be removed by driving a screw into the center.
I wouldn’t put the bung in the epoxy. Wait for epoxy to cure then put in the bung with varnish or glue. Thoughts?
Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 08:12 AM   #8
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 19,145
"Wait for epoxy to cure then put in the bung with varnish or glue. Thoughts?"

Epoxy is a great glue , what is frequently needed is a shim of wood to assist an old screw hole to hold the screw that pulls the wood to the deck .

Any waterproof glue will do , and allow the hold down screw to be removed.


The single kerf saw shown is a great tool , not only for deck work.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 08:31 AM   #9
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 678
F.F. So my thought process is to eliminate the screw altogether as water can always find its way around a screw. Fill the whole with epoxy up to the bottom of the countersink. This will pretty much assure no leaks in that hole (at least in my lifetime). When epoxy is cured pound in the bung with a little varnish / glue. Not arguing but looking for another view point. Happy to have you poke holes in my theory.
Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 08:56 AM   #10
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,704
Xsbank: The only thing I will add is a lot of the plugs I replace come out because of thickness lost in the deck. We still have 3/8” plus deck thickness but when the deck was installed 32 years ago some of the holes for the plugs weren’t very deep. When ever I replace a plug I also redrill/deepen the hole the plug goes into plus use a 3/4” number 8 screw to replace the 1” number 8. You can buy these or an equivalent at most wood working supply stores.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1F4D5BE7-A90D-4119-88F4-28FED11CC337.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	135.4 KB
ID:	84585  
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 09:51 AM   #11
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,175
Those are similar drills to what I used. The local chandlery had a 5 gallon pail of silicon bronze wood screws which I bought by the pound. It’s true that I would have preferred Robertson head but these are all that were available then.

That bung was good but many around it weren’t so I did them all. Did the seams too but no photos.
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
What are we offended about today?
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 07:54 AM   #12
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 19,145
"So my thought process is to eliminate the screw altogether as water can always find its way around a screw."

Yes all screws , every screw under the teak coating can be a leak..

The purpose of the screw is to hold the coating of teak tight to the deck , hopefully to be water tight .The goop between the wood pieces is also an attempt to keep water from running under the teak.

Sadly some of the TT I have repaired use wide teak planking with bungs that are for looks only ,only one screw in a dozen, as well as seams that are routed in the plank , again just for looks.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 08:18 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
timb's Avatar
 
City: Oriental N.C.
Country: usa
Vessel Name: true heading
Vessel Model: marine trader 38 dc
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 346
i may try to save my decks what size drill and countersink did you use ? where is the best place in the us to get the bungs and screws ?

all my bungs are missing where the for-deck starts . i wonder if the floor wore more there or if those bungs were shallower than the rest .
timb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 08:44 AM   #14
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,704
The pictures I posted previously are for 3/8” counter sink that I can adjust the depth. The plugs I make but you can buy them on line, try eBay. They should be less than $0.10/plug for the tapered ones. Our decks were done with number 8 x 1” screws that I replace with number 8 by 3/4”.

Here’s a source for counter sinks although I’ve never used them. They do say you can adjust the depth. I’m sure eBay also carries some.

https://www.irwin.com/tools/drill-bi...d-countersinks

If a 3/8” hole is buggererd up, I go up to a 1/2” hole, a larger screw and bung.

I have a plug box that keeps things together since bungs are an ongoing maintenance item on Hobo. Once you get going, the replacement goes pretty fast.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	0C1B07E6-D088-4D35-BA35-464DBD75EA61.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	171.2 KB
ID:	84613  
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 09:40 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
timb's Avatar
 
City: Oriental N.C.
Country: usa
Vessel Name: true heading
Vessel Model: marine trader 38 dc
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 346
thanks i see you have two kinds of glue .what are they?
timb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 10:19 AM   #16
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,704
One is a caulk for the screws and the other is epoxy for securing the plugs. I prefer to use West System but for one or two plugs, the two part stick is ok but doesn’t cure has hard.

When Hobo was built, they used epoxy or some very hard glue for the plugs. To clean the heads on the existing screws so I can back them out, I have two sharpened small screw drivers. I learned the hard way to take my time getting the old screws out. Once the head is stripped you have to get creative to get the screw out with out damaging the teak.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	6DC08D70-E0CA-4FC2-85F3-B98D50AA3FAA.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	126.8 KB
ID:	84615  
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 10:23 AM   #17
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,704
If you look at the pictures Xsbank posted, you’ll notice all the plugs have the grain aligned with the planks. Thats the way to do it.

Xsbank: Nice looking decks and seams! How old are they?
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 10:27 AM   #18
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,945
Easting:
I agree.
The purpose of the screw is to hold the deck plank down while the glue it is sitting in cures. Several years on, that glue s well cured and the screw can be discarded. I haven't yet replaced any of the screws that I have removed due to being too tall for the surrounding boards. I have used epoxy or black 291 in the hole and a new bung in 291 or white glue. Seems to work well as some of my repairs of this nature are pushing 20 years old themselves and are working well.
__________________
Keith
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 10:45 AM   #19
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
Easting:
I agree.
The purpose of the screw is to hold the deck plank down while the glue it is sitting in cures. Several years on, that glue s well cured and the screw can be discarded. I haven't yet replaced any of the screws that I have removed due to being too tall for the surrounding boards. I have used epoxy or black 291 in the hole and a new bung in 291 or white glue. Seems to work well as some of my repairs of this nature are pushing 20 years old themselves and are working well.
Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2019, 01:09 PM   #20
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,175
I recall it was GB32 595, which is about 1975. Those decks were done in ‘06/07.
__________________

__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
What are we offended about today?
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012