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Old 03-11-2014, 02:22 AM   #1
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flying bridge core materials

I have been searching for some information on this topic for quite some time and haven't had much luck. Maybe those of you have some experience with flybridge repairs can help me understand, what exactly the flybridge floor/core is made up of most commonly with Taiwanese trawlers. From what I have found the core is made up of a thick layer of fiberglass then wood scraps/plywood then a thin layer of fiber glass.

Though on my Universal it appear as though the top layer is really just epoxy paint over top of plywood (which has led to moisture problems.)

Any help much appreciated!
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Old 03-11-2014, 07:00 AM   #2
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Most cores seem to be Chinese Composite , house ply with a layer of GRP laid on top.

When the sealing for attached items is nor refreshed , water gets in the ply and it dissolves .
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Old 03-11-2014, 08:07 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoriana View Post
I have been searching for some information on this topic for quite some time and haven't had much luck. Maybe those of you have some experience with flybridge repairs can help me understand, what exactly the flybridge floor/core is made up of most commonly with Taiwanese trawlers. From what I have found the core is made up of a thick layer of fiberglass then wood scraps/plywood then a thin layer of fiber glass.

Though on my Universal it appear as though the top layer is really just epoxy paint over top of plywood (which has led to moisture problems.)

Any help much appreciated!
Exactly what mine was....teak/glass/blocks/really thin glass...but not plywood...blocks of scrap teak.

The chunks of teak weren't rotten...just all pulled away from the now disintegrating polyester resin that's just poured over and between them.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:07 AM   #4
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Psneeld,
Did you put in plywood and re-glass that? My upper bridge didn't have teak decks, always was glass with a fairly aggressive anti-skid. It would be pretty much impossible to re- create the anti-skid unless there is a trick to that. My bridge feels soft in the middle. Was not mentioned in the survey and when purchasing the boat I asked the broker about it and he said it was because of the span of the bridge. It is about 10' and is Un-supported below so I trusted what he was saying. Based on other things found I'm not sure that was the best thing.

And since I said that.... Pretty good gig these surveyors have going. They go through your boat, play with all of the things and give you their "opinion" of what is going on. So then you buy the boat based on a professional opinion and find many things missed. I understand they can't find everything but there is absolutely nothing held to task as there are disclaimers everywhere. This was the first boat bought with a survey and they listed many things and I bought it accordingly knowing what work needed to be done. Not bitching about that. It is just a good gig that there is no hook in the inspection they do. Again, not trying to beat up the industry of surveyors. Ours was from a very reputable company and he did a good job for the most part but I've read many stories from TF that didn't turn out so well.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:36 AM   #5
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There are several ways to replace non skid

As simple as adding sand to finish coat or buying paint with sand already in it. West cores are very common and easy to repair.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:45 AM   #6
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Exactly what mine was....teak/glass/blocks/really thin glass...but not plywood...blocks of scrap teak.

The chunks of teak weren't rotten...just all pulled away from the now disintegrating polyester resin that's just poured over and between them.
A picture is worth a thousand words! Referring back to the current similar thread in the Albin forum, I can now see why you are disgusted with this construction. Perhaps this was an evolving technique they were experimenting with? I note that your blocks of teak appear to be spaced much closer than mine and I wonder if that makes a difference in structural integrity. My blocks are at least about 1/2" apart so there is a lot of resin between them. Perhaps they found that spacing them too close together prevented the resin from getting down between the boards evenly? Just a wild guess, but your likely right about the cheap resin.
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Old 03-11-2014, 01:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Most cores seem to be Chinese Composite , house ply with a layer of GRP laid on top.

When the sealing for attached items is nor refreshed , water gets in the ply and it dissolves .
Ir would appear though that my boat doesn't have that top layer of fiberglass, so would it be safe to assume that my mine is made up of Chinese composite then plywood with xpoxy paint like material?
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Exactly what mine was....teak/glass/blocks/really thin glass...but not plywood...blocks of scrap teak.

The chunks of teak weren't rotten...just all pulled away from the now disintegrating polyester resin that's just poured over and between them.
Did you discover how the water was getting under the top layer of fiberglass? I assume there was some water?
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:50 PM   #8
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Psneeld,
Did you put in plywood and re-glass that? My upper bridge didn't have teak decks, always was glass with a fairly aggressive anti-skid. It would be pretty much impossible to re- create the anti-skid unless there is a trick to that. My bridge feels soft in the middle. Was not mentioned in the survey and when purchasing the boat I asked the broker about it and he said it was because of the span of the bridge. It is about 10' and is Un-supported below so I trusted what he was saying. Based on other things found I'm not sure that was the best thing.

And since I said that.... Pretty good gig these surveyors have going. They go through your boat, play with all of the things and give you their "opinion" of what is going on. So then you buy the boat based on a professional opinion and find many things missed. I understand they can't find everything but there is absolutely nothing held to task as there are disclaimers everywhere. This was the first boat bought with a survey and they listed many things and I bought it accordingly knowing what work needed to be done. Not bitching about that. It is just a good gig that there is no hook in the inspection they do. Again, not trying to beat up the industry of surveyors. Ours was from a very reputable company and he did a good job for the most part but I've read many stories from TF that didn't turn out so well.
Yes...I put in a plywood core where I took the loose blocks out, drilled holes throughout and injected epoxy, slatherd the ply with epoxy and filler, and placed the original decking (the glass from under the teak), then 2 layers of 6oz cloth with an 18 oz layer of roving between epoxied on top...

After the deck, I then used 2 layers of glass tape all the way around the flybridge fairing as I glassed the fairing down to make it totally waterproof and did the exterior the same after removing the wood trim on the outside of the bridge fairing.

Plus...I'd be willing to put money on your broker was FOS about the construction.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:56 PM   #9
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Ir would appear though that my boat doesn't have that top layer of fiberglass, so would it be safe to assume that my mine is made up of Chinese composite then plywood with xpoxy paint like material?

Did you discover how the water was getting under the top layer of fiberglass? I assume there was some water?
Water was dripping out the drain holes from the top lip all around...plus you could see where the wood had swelled/freeze cracked the glass and brown ooze was seeping out...very common on Albins and probably other brands too.
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Old 03-11-2014, 05:29 PM   #10
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My fly bridge deck was spongy when I bought her. No leaks below into the cabin, but water would drip from the weep holes under the top lip. I was able to cut out large sections of the fiberglass (2' x 4') and remove the soggy 1/2 inch end grain balsa. Replaced it with the same, epoxied in place. Also replaced the ply wood under the helm chair. I was able to re-use the decking, so didn't lose the anti-skid function. I did it piece meal style because I would not attempt to remove the fly bridge from the cabin top. Everything is a compromise.
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Old 03-11-2014, 08:58 PM   #11
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Water was dripping out the drain holes from the top lip all around...plus you could see where the wood had swelled/freeze cracked the glass and brown ooze was seeping out...very common on Albins and probably other brands too.
What was below the wood chunks that you pulled out?
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:04 PM   #12
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What was below the wood chunks that you pulled out?
One layer of glass...so thin that it had holes worn in it from working against the beams underneath and where the blocks were loose.

I am really surprised there was only a "soft" spot and it just didn't give way under someone's weight...goes to show you how strong a couple layers of glass (the top ones under the teak deck) can be...just not very rigid.
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Old 03-11-2014, 11:28 PM   #13
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Does anyone have a good method of cutting out a core sample and filling the hole in?
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Old 03-12-2014, 01:08 AM   #14
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Teak and resin is not a good combination since teak contains oil - FRP / resin doesn't bond well or doesn't bond at all with teak....
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Old 03-12-2014, 06:35 AM   #15
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I just used a Skill Saw with the blade about 3/8 inch exposed. I then lifted the top skin off and saved it to place back over the new core... for the core I used 1/2 inch ply as that with thickened epoxy made up the right thickness.
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Old 03-12-2014, 06:45 AM   #16
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Treadmaster is a very fine no skid that can simply be glued down to most surfaces.

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Old 03-12-2014, 08:23 AM   #17
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Does anyone have a good method of cutting out a core sample and filling the hole in?
I took lots of core samples on my old Mainship before I redid the flybridge deck. I used a regular 1 1/2 in hole saw with the pilot drill barely protruding from the saw.
Most of the samples verified what the moisture meter said, but many did not. I filled those with 1 1/2 ounce mat and poly resin, what I used to repair the deck.
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