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Old 02-08-2014, 09:07 AM   #1
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Flooring material

I will be replacing the flooring in my trawler. I'm looking at a vinyl that comes in 4 x 8 sheets. Apparently very easy to maintain.
I'm wondering... has anyone painted their interior with a non-skid coating?
Something similar to what is on our decks or on the floor of our garages?
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Old 02-08-2014, 09:29 AM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr./Ms. J. Wouldn't non skid be difficult to keep clean? On a deck or garage floor one has the option of sudsing and hosing off. Not so, I expect in an interior space. How about a fitted carpet? Not fastened down so one could remove it and have it cleaned off board. Snaps or Velcro at the corners to eliminate slippage/movement.
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Old 02-08-2014, 11:21 AM   #3
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What RTF said. I'm not a big fan of carpet in boats, but after trying various things in various boats over the years. I settled on cheap I/O carpet cut to exact fit. I can pick it up and shake it over the side, it is a sound deadener, it keeps sand and dog hair from going down the hatches, and if I get to a dock, I can hose it off and hang it over a rail to dry.
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:23 AM   #4
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I'm looking at a vinyl that comes in 4 x 8 sheets.

At a boat show I saw a Selene with a vinyl floor that had very modest no skid built into the pattern.

Call them?
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Old 02-09-2014, 08:33 AM   #5
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WE have Teak and Holly flooring inside. We have the typical canvas/Isenglass enclosure on the outside and are very careful of any kind of liquid spill. Hard floors can get very slippey.
They have a product made of some kind of vinyl that looks real close to Teak and Holly and had I believe a non-skid surface. It is expensive but looks great. If interested, I will look up my notes. For a few bucks, they sent me more than a half dozen samples of all of the styles and finishes. In the end we settled for T&H plywood.
Oh, while I was writing this it came to me. The product is Lonseal. here is the website
LONSEAL Flooring: LONWOOD MARINE - <b>Lonwood Marine</b> is Lonseal's high-performance, slip-resistant marine safety flooring. Our wood looks come in both matte and glossy styles, and have color coordinating trim.<br> <br><p>Click on "Next" under the
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Old 02-10-2014, 07:02 AM   #6
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>Hard floors can get very slippey.<

This is because none of the current teak and holly is built properly.

It is just Eye Candy ,, the romance of of the good old days.

A genuine teak and holly floor IS NON SKID as all the holly will stand proud of the teak.

Sadly this can not be done with teak as thick as a business card glued on plywood

The best that can be done with the modern version is Gym or bowling alley no slip varnish , and no-skid strips at galley , range and on all stairs.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:07 AM   #7
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........I'm wondering... has anyone painted their interior with a non-skid coating?
Something similar to what is on our decks or on the floor of our garages?
No doubt somebody has, but you have to look and think of your boat. Is it a utilitarian work boat, a luxury yacht, or something inbetween? To me, painting with non-skid garage floor paint would be pretty low end. Not for me.

If you are replacing carpet, you might be very surprised at what's underneath. Carpet covers a lot of sins. Cheap plywood with knotholes, poorly matched joints, etc. If I had chosen to paint my boat's subfloor (it never crossed my mind), I would have had to lay new plywood over the old. Even then, I suspect the seams would show through paint.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:21 AM   #8
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They make a non-skid additive that can be mixed in with varnish or poly. Some products are a silica base like in sand which is hard on the bare foot and some products are more of a mica base and there are others. These products can be either mixed in with a clear finish or broadcast on the wet surface like spreading rice seeds which is a more even pattern than like feeding chickens.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:41 AM   #9
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We painted our scuffed plywood floors with a product that is made to go over outdoor wood decking. Got it at Home Depot. Has a nice non-skid surface, but not so aggressive that it hurts bare feet. Hasn't been a problem cleaning so far. It was supposed to be a temporary fix to let us get cruising last summer, but it may just end up permanent. Strong ammonia smell when applying, and needs about 4 hours before light usage, 24 hours to set. Certainly not "yacht" quality but it works for us. Teak & Holly plywood is attractive, but that project in low on the cost/time priority list right now. When I had my Harley, my mantra was "chrome won't get you home". I put money into performance and reliability before bling. Same with the boat.
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:40 AM   #10
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My old next door neighbor was a paint salesman and gave me some "floor paint" for our then back porch. Heavy traffic spot but it held up amazingly well.
I now use another floor paint in our Willard on the plywood floor. Don't use any anti-skid at all and have no problems even on our very rolly boat.
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:25 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooksie View Post
What RTF said. I'm not a big fan of carpet in boats, but after trying various things in various boats over the years. I settled on cheap I/O carpet cut to exact fit. I can pick it up and shake it over the side, it is a sound deadener, it keeps sand and dog hair from going down the hatches, and if I get to a dock, I can hose it off and hang it over a rail to dry.
What holds your carpet in place and keeps the edges from curling, velcro?
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Old 02-10-2014, 02:35 PM   #12
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What holds your carpet in place and keeps the edges from curling, velcro?
We have that non-slid mesh. also the edges of the carpet are bonded.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:48 PM   #13
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What holds your carpet in place and keeps the edges from curling, velcro?
Nothing except a little silicone squeeged here and there on the back. I have the same carpet below in my other boat with no silicone and it seems to stay in place without it but this boat rolls alot.
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:43 AM   #14
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Boats are tiny compared to houses , so go to a local small store and ask to see remnants.

Take the carpet aboard , cut it to fit and bring it back to the shop to have edging sewn on.

Not at all expensive and looks fine , and can be easily removed if rinsing salt water out becomes necessary.

When it wears out or becomes disgusting , simply bring it back for a duplicate .

Wool is better in cold areas for bare feet.
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Old 02-11-2014, 10:21 PM   #15
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WE have Teak and Holly flooring inside. We have the typical canvas/Isenglass enclosure on the outside and are very careful of any kind of liquid spill. Hard floors can get very slippey.
They have a product made of some kind of vinyl that looks real close to Teak and Holly and had I believe a non-skid surface. It is expensive but looks great. If interested, I will look up my notes. For a few bucks, they sent me more than a half dozen samples of all of the styles and finishes. In the end we settled for T&H plywood.
Oh, while I was writing this it came to me. The product is Lonseal. here is the website
LONSEAL Flooring: LONWOOD MARINE - <b>Lonwood Marine</b> is Lonseal's high-performance, slip-resistant marine safety flooring. Our wood looks come in both matte and glossy styles, and have color coordinating trim.<br> <br><p>Click on "Next" under the
Thanks for the link to the Lonwood Marine, some very interesting looking product, and I have requested some samples.
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Old 02-11-2014, 11:53 PM   #16
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I think you will like the samples.
It cost me about $1000 to do an 8' X 8' area using teak plywood. I remember pricing the Lonseal and it would have come out to about the same. Since I used to have a woodworking business, I still had access to my old shop through the new owner.
If a person does not have the time or the skills to do it with plywood, the Lonseal would be a great alternative. As a matter of fact, the Lonseal is better in lots of ways.
When you get ready to use either product IM me and I will send you my cell no. I can answer most if not all of you questions.

Have fun with it.
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Old 02-12-2014, 12:11 AM   #17
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I think you will like the samples.
It cost me about $1000 to do an 8' X 8' area using teak plywood. I remember pricing the Lonseal and it would have come out to about the same. Since I used to have a woodworking business, I still had access to my old shop through the new owner.
If a person does not have the time or the skills to do it with plywood, the Lonseal would be a great alternative. As a matter of fact, the Lonseal is better in lots of ways.
When you get ready to use either product IM me and I will send you my cell no. I can answer most if not all of you questions.

Have fun with it.
Thank you for the great information i.e.cost and skills. My skills are about like my pocket book...both very challenged. lol I may very well be sending you a PM saying HELP but I will try to get it all figured out. Trim work is where I have my greastest concern and I forsee the it to be the greatest challenge. This does look like a very interesting product though, and I am going to be doing further research on it's application.
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Old 02-12-2014, 12:33 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
I will be replacing the flooring in my trawler. I'm looking at a vinyl that comes in 4 x 8 sheets. Apparently very easy to maintain.
I'm wondering... has anyone painted their interior with a non-skid coating?
Something similar to what is on our decks or on the floor of our garages?
I agree with RTF. Non-skid would be a massive PITA IMO.

Have you considered Laminate click flooring. Have used that a lot in high traffic and high moisture areas with great success. So much so, I'll be using that in AXE when the time comes for interior fitout
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:30 AM   #19
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One very important thing with removable plywood floor hatches. Plywood chips and breaks out very easily on the corners and when you remove and insert the floor boards often enough, there wont be much of a corner left. very easy remedy though. put a 1/4" or thicker solid teak or white oak edging around all of the boards. This will protect the corners and edges from breaking out. If you are applying the Lonseal to a solid floor that wont be removed, don't worry about edging.

BTW, I just noticed that we were almost neighbors up until about 2 months ago. I used to live in Kemah and Seabrook and I had a shop in San Leon.
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Old 02-12-2014, 12:16 PM   #20
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Went to Lowes and bought "oak" self sticking 4" X 36" strips and laid them down in the salon, galley, and forward cabin. That was in 2000 and they are still good. You can't beat them for price and ease of installation.
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