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Old 09-28-2013, 10:26 AM   #1
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Flexiteek or similar

Hello guys.
I am about to launch my boat….hufffff finaly!
We left the outside floor for last, and we realized this was a good decision because we do not get to a consensus. My children want to paint white to be covered by removable wet carpets or rugs. The Admiral is still pushing for the original planned teak . The one changing his mind is me and I tell you why.
I have read here many complains about the hard work needed to maintain teak, this plus the fact that I have 8 screws in my lower back pushed me away from the glorious teak floor.
However, eager to be kind with all opinions and whiling to get out of this issue once and for all, I am now looking into the Flexiteek option.
I have read here opinions about it but none based on real experiences. Is any of you guys using it or any other similar product? Can you share your experience with the plastic teak floor?
Thank you for your help

Fernando
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:47 AM   #2
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Fernando:

We spent summer vacaion time with a West Bay 58 on which the aft deck and swim grid area was done in a plastic imitation teak finish. I don't know which one, but it did look decently like real teak.

It was HOT. I mean really HOT whenever it was in direct sun, even when the ambiant air was not really hot. You couldn't walk on it without wearing sandals, shoes or running to get to a shady spot.
Our summer temperatures were generally in the mid 20s, C, with the occasional daily high into the 30s. Only when the air temp was low enough that you wouldn't be walking around barefoot was it col enough that you could do so.

Our decks are real teak, so the side by side comparison was stark.
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Old 09-28-2013, 02:39 PM   #3
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Thank you Koliver. That's my fear as Brazil is extremely hot all year round
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Old 09-28-2013, 03:39 PM   #4
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Fernando my approach may seem overly simplistic but I find it best to walk the docks locally and see what others use. It has helped me make many decisions of what and what not to use or do.

When in Rome do as the Romans sorta thing. There's usually a good reason for many people using similar materials locally.

Please post more pictures of your boat soon.
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Old 09-28-2013, 05:01 PM   #5
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Craig

There are many boats with FG floors painted in white. Mama does not like it! She says this is a Trawler, a small ship, better yet, a home; not a bucket with an engine. My question is about new materials, thinks that are still new in this market. I thought about it because it would solve both ends of my problem.

Yet, your idea has been the basis of my decisions during the entire construction of Rainha Jannota. Another important thing here, see boats as many as you can, but preferably those small professional boats, the ones with a lot of constant use. There is where we learn things and get free of dogmas and taboos about this or that practice.

The boat is starting the last construction stage and many things are now finished, soon I will post a site where you can see the photos from day 1 to the launching.
Then I’ll post the photos of the voyages and the learning process

Best wishes

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Old 09-28-2013, 09:48 PM   #6
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Old 09-29-2013, 12:15 AM   #7
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Have you looked thru these other forum discussions of synthetic teak decking? The 3rd one is quite long


Synthetic Teak Decking - YachtForums.Com

Synthetic teak reviews? - The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

Synthetic teak deck - Boat Design Forums
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Old 09-29-2013, 02:07 AM   #8
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New teak decking do not require any more maintenance than any other decking material out there. It's the old ones with failing caulking and missing bungs that do. Your nice boat deserves real teak decking (glued down, no screws and bungs). Mi dos centavos.
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Old 09-29-2013, 02:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Portuguese View Post
Thank you Koliver. That's my fear as Brazil is extremely hot all year round
Yes, I would agree with KOliver...a fellow with it on just his (quite wide) swim platform near us on our berth finger has often mentioned how hot it got, especially compared to the rest of his decks which are fibreglassed and white. I was thinking of using it up on my flybridge deck and cockpit. In light of this, if you don't go real teak, stay with nonskid white or off-white paint, is my advice. The family might have the right idea.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:12 AM   #10
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From my experience I would agree with the consensus of hot synthetic teak decks are a real problem in warm climates.

We looked into it when looking for options replacing our 30 year old original teak deck.

FWIW, we decided to go with a 12mm teak deck(glued not screwed), glad we did, it looks right. One of the great things about a teak deck is its natural non skid properties wet or dry. By the way teak deck upkeep is quite easy and not time consuming.

It is obviously more expensive than a painted deck though.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:16 AM   #11
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As a sort of addendum to the above discussion. One thing about going non-skid paint initially to save cost, is, later on, if your heart still hankers after teak, it can still be added and stuck down with nothing sacrificed in the meantime.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:59 AM   #12
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One thing about going non-skid paint initially to save cost, is, later on, if your heart still hankers after teak, it can still be added and stuck down with nothing sacrificed in the meantime.
My decks were redone, painted non slip on the fully exposed bow section required 2 layers of fibreglass for strength and stiffness, the glued teak elsewhere required only one layer of fibreglass. Not a big cost, but a cost nevertheless. Even the pale grey nonslip gets too hot for summer bare feet.
I considered synthetic teak, it was still going to cost heaps. But I understand the interior cabin sole stuff costs less and works well.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:29 AM   #13
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< Mama does not like it! She says this is a Trawler, a small ship, better yet, a home; not a bucket with an engine.>

And as a small ship traction , not going overboard is as least as important as >looks<.

Treadmaster does look less yachty than a slather of teak , but like teak a pail of water is slightly absorbed so stays cool for a while.


Treadmaster Marine - the very best alternative to wooden boat decking

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Old 09-29-2013, 11:02 AM   #14
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Guys

Thank you all for your help and opinions. As always, I found in them loads of common sense and wise thoughts.
An additional advantage on synthetic Teak may be the fact that we do not need a professional carpenter to install it. A handyman can do it. My wife says that I am one hell of a handyman, when I want to be!!!
Another think that I found out is that all synthetic teaks, brands apart, are made of 100% PVC. What changes is the density of the different brands, in another words, weight/foot3

Therefore and with your help, I decided that I will paint non-skid and hope to see in time what to do later.
Thank you all!
Fernando
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Old 09-30-2013, 06:01 AM   #15
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>I decided that I will paint non-skid and hope to see in time what to do later<.

Coarse cotton laid on a still setting epoxy paint , then again lightly painted can easily be done to look like a moulded deck.

Refinishing is a snap as cotton sands off much easier than sand.

IF you will use sand , the model railroads folks have very fine sand.

Pro no skid addatives will frequently be ground nut shells , also easy to refinish.

Have fun!
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Old 09-30-2013, 06:59 AM   #16
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Or you could just use International (Interlux) 'Interdeck', which is basically Toplac with fine grit mixed into it - brilliant non-skid finish, easily touched up or over-coated, and matches all the usual colours of the range. That's what I use and I'm very happy with it. Goes on with a roller really well also for large areas, and as you want grip - no need to tip off with a brush except to do the edges and tricky places.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:10 AM   #17
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Or you could just use International (Interlux) 'Interdeck', which is basically Toplac with fine grit mixed into it - brilliant non-skid finish, easily touched up or over-coated, and matches all the usual colours of the range. That's what I use and I'm very happy with it. Goes on with a roller really well also for large areas, and as you want grip - no need to tip off with a brush except to do the edges and tricky places.
Just used it myself after getting rid of the teak deck and very happy with it...very easy to use and nice uniform surface as opposed to mix in or more coarse non skids.


My white Interdeck is almost a little yellow (NOT yellow but slightly off true white) and the gloss Brightside white is a little blue white...so the result with multiple tape lines to section off the deck comes up very smartly. Looks factory where the prep work was flawless (not the whole deck but some areas). Many compliments already.
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:21 PM   #18
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I've had it for 8 years. Installed in San Diego the guy who did it is Charlie Lucy, great guy to work with. It DOES NOT like some chemicals like acetone. After about three years the colr got darker and the surface lost it's rough finish (went smooth). However you can refresh the color and surface by pressure washing and goin over it with course sandpaper. Sand paper also good for removing drps of varnish, etc. I like it but it is a little hot to walk on in bare feet compared to teak.
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Old 10-04-2013, 04:01 PM   #19
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Dear Fellows

Yesterday I was doing some electrical work on my boat and varnishing the closet doors and other very good stuff.
At the end of the day, when the sun was getting ready to set and everyone else had left, I sat down in pile of Teak boards in front of the boat with a big gigantic glass of Venezuelan rum and Coke and a dash of lime, the famous “Cuba Libre”. All of a sudden, all became clear as crystal water while I thought to myself:
The marketing guys are very smart. I know because I did marketing for 15 years during the most international part of my career. They call Flxiteek, the Synthetic Teak. Well, synthetic Teak my behind. There’s only one Teak and that is the natural wood with its natural tone of brown, its natural smell and the additional demand for careful maintenance to stay beautiful. Just like a very beautiful woman needs the same care to stay beautiful. Everything that brings value to a house, or a boat, needs attention and care. That’s why it stays beautiful.
You know what? I am going to feel my outside decks with Teak, I am going to cover my decks with added value. I can always sell my jewelry to do that. When the boat goes to the water, we’ll no longer need jewelry.
Believe me; this decision came way before I finished the first “Cuba Libre”. I was so happy with the decision that I had another one.

Regards

fernando
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:45 PM   #20
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Now gentlemen, that's how you make a decision.
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