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Old 12-21-2015, 01:36 PM   #21
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Don, those don't look too bad. I saw something similar at last years Miami boat show but the valves were not as nice as those.
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Old 12-21-2015, 01:42 PM   #22
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https://www.ansul.com/en/us/pages/Pr...e+Extinguisher


looks like something is available...for restaurant cooking oil/grease fires
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Old 12-21-2015, 01:47 PM   #23
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Those small units CLAIM A-B-C rating using AFFF but I noticed the Amerex units only state A-B for the AFFF. Makes me suspicious of the rating on the smaller ones.

Interesting all the same - worth having a couple around for the small stuff - even if they aren't USCG rated.
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Old 12-21-2015, 03:19 PM   #24
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Regarding fire extinguishers....get the biggest you can.
The reason I say this is a few years ago I saw a video taken by the Towboat US guy (cam on the boat) while he was putting out a fire on a sailboat. The towboat capt was showing the video and narrating.
The boat was on a town mooring at Block Island. The owner started his engine to charge batteries then went a shore for breakfast (stupid I agree).
So the towboat captain arrived and started using a fire extinguisher to put out the fire. He had to work his way down the companionway and the extinguishers didn't last long enough. People kept throwing him extinguishers from their own boats and they would be used up in a few seconds. He went thru a lot of extinguishers before he and a off duty fireman who climbed aboard got the fire put out.
One large unit would have helped tremendously.
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Old 12-21-2015, 03:43 PM   #25
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There is a saying that every thing dries out but nothing unburns. Dry chemical is very effective and the mess is less difficult to clean than you think. Foam extinguishers are a good idea but they will have a lot of difficulty with a 3 dimensional fire. Water is plentiful and cheap. When sprayed it does a lot of firefighting.
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Old 12-21-2015, 06:05 PM   #26
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https://www.ansul.com/en/us/pages/Pr...e+Extinguisher

looks like something is available...for restaurant cooking oil/grease fires
The wet agent (Class K) mostly exist for health department rules. They're made to react with cooking fats. The fancy term is "saponification," which I never can remember without Google. I wouldn't put one on a boat.

The big issue with firing off a dry chemical extinguisher in a restaurant (or grocery store) is that any non-sealed food must be disposed of.

I once saw the aftermath of an employee who fired off a dry chem at an arcing low voltage display light socket in the produce section of a big supermarket. It didn't do anything to the socket, but County Public Health made them toss ALL the produce in the store.

It is downright astounding how much fire can be extinguished with a water can in the right hands. But it won't carry a Class C designation (neither will most foam extinguishers as they are 93%-99+% water) because the stream can potentially conduct electricity.

A Class C fire is energized electrical. You have to remove the energy source, and then deal with the remaining Class A or B fire problem.
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Old 12-21-2015, 08:56 PM   #27
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The wet agent (Class K) mostly exist for health department rules. They're made to react with cooking fats. The fancy term is "saponification," which I never can remember without Google. I wouldn't put one on a boat.

The big issue with firing off a dry chemical extinguisher in a restaurant (or grocery store) is that any non-sealed food must be disposed of.

I once saw the aftermath of an employee who fired off a dry chem at an arcing low voltage display light socket in the produce section of a big supermarket. It didn't do anything to the socket, but County Public Health made them toss ALL the produce in the store.

It is downright astounding how much fire can be extinguished with a water can in the right hands. But it won't carry a Class C designation (neither will most foam extinguishers as they are 93%-99+% water) because the stream can potentially conduct electricity.

A Class C fire is energized electrical. You have to remove the energy source, and then deal with the remaining Class A or B fire problem.
Interesting bout the posted extinguisher...a new one for me......

....having fought several boat/ship fires...the use of foam can't be underestimated where straight water stream does little if there is combustible liquids in my experience.
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Old 12-21-2015, 10:30 PM   #28
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If the goal is foam (AFFF), how about this 2.5 gallon unit:

Amerex 2.5 gallon foam

Here is the manufacturers PDF on the unit (page 3).

Amerex

USCG Approved Here

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Old 12-22-2015, 03:59 AM   #29
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Foam would be very handy to extinguish a bilge full of burning diesel, although isn't the best tool for other types of boat fires where the surface is not contained. You would need enough volume to get 100% coverage in your bilge; 99% isn't good enough.

Put some thought into how you'd use the extinguisher ahead of time. A bilge full of burning diesel throws off a lot of heat; If your engine is only accessed from a hatch above, getting the foam where you want it could be challenging.

Also consider where you store your extinguishers. I've heard of people having to run through the fire to access their extinguisher.

I don't have an issue with dry chemical extinguishers. In the aftermath of a boat fire, i'd rather see a mess than a boat burnt to the waterline.
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Old 12-22-2015, 09:06 AM   #30
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Foam would be very handy to extinguish a bilge full of burning diesel, although isn't the best tool for other types of boat fires where the surface is not contained. You would need enough volume to get 100% coverage in your bilge; 99% isn't good enough.

Put some thought into how you'd use the extinguisher ahead of time. A bilge full of burning diesel throws off a lot of heat; If your engine is only accessed from a hatch above, getting the foam where you want it could be challenging.

Of course in reality, if confronted will a bilge full of burning diesel, I think I'd just take one quick look, and then get everybody off the boat ASAP!
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:16 AM   #31
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Also, a Fireblanket in its holder/bag mounted VERY near the stove for whatever cathes fire there, especially oil/grease - Cheap, easy to use, safe.
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Old 12-22-2015, 12:22 PM   #32
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Also, a Fireblanket in its holder/bag mounted VERY near the stove for whatever cathes fire there, especially oil/grease - Cheap, easy to use, safe.
As are in easy reach containers of salt and/or baking soda.
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Old 12-22-2015, 07:49 PM   #33
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Most of the newest human friendly fire extinguishing systems use FM200 or something similar. It has enough air for human beings but not enough to oxygen for the fire. Instead of using CO2, FM200 leaves no residue and will put out a fire without killing people in the process.

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Old 12-22-2015, 07:52 PM   #34
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Also, for flammable metals (aluminum, etc.) Class D extinguishers are recommended.

That is the only way to stop them from burning since many metals will continue to burn underwater.
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Old 12-22-2015, 08:12 PM   #35
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Stubones has a point. When I first got in the business, halon hadn't been invented. It was common to have CO2 flooding systems in engine rooms. Every so often one would go off with someone in the engine room and kill them.

Halon was a big safety improvement. If the system was sized correctly for the engine room, it would put out the fire and not kill you. That's why it's important to not go oversize on your automatic flooding system.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:28 PM   #36
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Touch of reality

Folks... I've spent more than 30 years fighting fires. Most of this discussion is academic. And while I too realize that a foam PW might make a nice smothering blanket on a puddle of burning diesel, if you have a puddle of diesel in your bilge burning... you are already in some serious sh!t my friends. Dry chems are light, fast, effective and pretty good at preventing a flashback. Worrying about the clean-up of the powder is overblown and really the least of your worries. Remember you don't have to empty the extinguisher. A short blast may be all it takes. Conversely, having that firepower in your hands can make the difference between a small problem and a disaster.

Your goal is to stop it NOW. No pussyfooting around with alternative methods. No wet blankets. No running for a bucket to scoop water with. Every second that fire burns, it can expand. The hotter it gets the more damage your wiring, components and hull takes. Short circuits occur during a fire and are transmitted to other systems. Honestly, if you have an well involved engine room, the nightmare of a non-totaled, boat could be worse than it burning to the water line.

The little Coast Guard approved BC Extinquishers are OK. Personally, I'd rather have a commercial quality 3A40BC (in addition to the cute little white "marine" ones). You may have one shot at saving your baby. Why scrimp or mess around?
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:22 AM   #37
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I have 50 years of firefighting. I wouldn't hesitate using waterspray if available.
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Old 12-23-2015, 10:51 AM   #38
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"I'm in your boat"! My very first trip to Alaska in 1991, the one that made me obsessed to have my own boat there was flavored by an engine room fire, in the dark of early morning, aboard a 42' Monk trawler while on a fishing trip. We were a couple miles offshore out of Whale Bay in the dark and the alarm and smoke every where was very disorienting. As hoped, the automatic extinguisher worked and the fire was out but the electricals were out. A good skipper got us all through it and back safely and I was too "naive" at that time to realize the danger we were potentially in because the system worked as it should. Years later, when I found my 42' and took her up there I bought the biggest FireBoy extinguisher for the ER and have several more hand helds throughout the boat and have them maintained/checked yearly. It was only after time had passed that I realized the magnitude and potential of that event and it has stayed with me ever since. Yes, his ER had to be cleaned up but that boat is still afloat in Sitka and I say just get what is MORE THAN adequate to do the job and maintain it. There may not be a second chance.
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Old 12-23-2015, 10:57 AM   #39
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I have 50 years of firefighting. I wouldn't hesitate using waterspray if available.
Nor would I, if it were immediately available. But than I know the strengths and more importantly the weaknesses of same. Remember too, we're talking extinguishers, not hose streams chief. 95% of boaters have probably never fought a fire in their life. For the uninitiated, a dry Chem is the easiest and arguably most effective extinguisher. That said, my point is that folks should not suddenly feel that they need to run out and find some alternative method of firefighting because they now feel that the residual powder is worse than the fire. What is important is knocking it down. NOW!
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Old 12-23-2015, 04:05 PM   #40
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I think training and the experience training brings is invaluable. I don't know where recreational boaters can get good training, but I highly recommend looking into it. You will be amazed at how fast your skill improves in a very short time. In your first attempt you will hardly put out a small fire before the extinguisher, a small portable unit, is expended. A few more tries and some pointers from the instructor and you will be amazed at how much fire you can put out!

You will also learn as you progress through more advanced techniques and complex situations that the first defense is no fire at all. Be careful where you stow flammable and volatile materials. I once saw a cardboard box with paint spray cans and solvents stacked on top of a pump motor.

And you will learn it isn't like the movies. Once the fire gets going you can't see and you can't breathe.

Many recreational boats are not well built in terms of containing a fire and not providing fuel for the fire. As an example carpeted engine rooms are comfy and quiet. But....

Maintain your systems. Zero tolerance for oil / fuel / propane leaks. Fix chafed wires now. Keep a close eye on your wet exhaust system.

As many have said in this thread do more than the minimum. Look at each space on your boat and imagine a fire. Ask yourself how would you get out if the usual way is blocked? How would you reach a fire extinguisher if you are stuck where you are standing? If you are honest in your assessment you will wind up buying more than the minimum number of portables.
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