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Old 04-30-2014, 09:39 PM   #21
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Nice job Roger!
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Old 04-30-2014, 10:17 PM   #22
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Nice job Roger. Glad the roller worked out.
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Old 05-01-2014, 12:50 AM   #23
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Thanks for sharing and good work! Didn't know about the G10, thanks.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:38 AM   #24
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We've used G10 for backing plates, but in the 1/4 in. thickness. I usually order it form McMaster Carr. It isn't cheap but works great and easier to cut than stainless plate.
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:36 AM   #25
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To repair something is to replace all damaged or worn parts to original configuration. Dosn't sound like anybody's thought about that or considered it. Just injecting some "stuff" into the void left by the rotted away plywood.

How big is/was the piece of plywood that partially rotted away? The whole foredeck or 2' square or 12" square or ??

It would seem to me one would need to remove the overlay holding the plywood in place, remove the partially rotted piece of ply. Then attach the new piece of ply and overlay as originally done during manufacture.

Plywood is very stiff and strong so just injecting some goo that hardens is no structural solution at all. Even if the goo turned solid is much stronger than the plywood. One could install a piece of steel in the "void" and be much weaker than the original plywood configuration.


From the last pic it looks like the backing plate could be large enough to regain most of the original strength .. perhaps all but I doubt it. Pictures can be deceiving. A deck is going to flex .. like it or not. A backing plate dos'nt eliminate flex of a deck. It reduces it and spreads it around to a larger area depending on how large the backing plate is. Ski in NC suggested a propper repair but was ignored. Andy G and Poach were definitely sniff'in up the right tree too IMO.

That said tear'in up the whole foredeck for a propper repair wouldn't be practical either and FAPP Rodgerh has fixed the problem but cracks could appear at the edges of the smallish (?) backing plate in the future. A larger plywood backing plate would have been better IMO.
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:15 PM   #26
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We are only talking about a couple inches of wet core around the opening. I think his repair is spot on, and the backing plate is beefier the boat was from the factory.

We did a similar repair to several stanchions on our sailboat (dug out 1-2 inches of wet core, filled with thickened epoxy, redrilled holes and reinstalled with slightly larger backing plates). Never had any flex issues. A few years later we had an incident with another boat during a storm. One stanchion went right through their hull and another bent over 90 degrees. Yet, even with all that force, the deck came away with no problems at all. Not even any stress cracks in the gelcoat. That alone sold me on filling small areas with thickened epoxy. In fact, whenver we remove deck fitting to reseal, we now dig out a bit of core and fill with epoxy just to prevent any future water intrusion. I think Sabre and a few other high end builders do this from the factory. Anyway, just my personal experience.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:10 PM   #27
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It was 2to 3" estimated by the OP (Rogerh as I recall) and that was on the outside of a 5.5" hole .. round I assume.

That means the edge of the fill material and where the stress riser would presumably be is probably 8" outbd of CL. So if one put a backing plate 16" by 16" the backing plate would likely fall on or very close to the edge of the fill where a bending moment (or stress riser if you like that expression) could easily crack the deck. I'm think'in the backing plate should have been 20 X 20". Rodgerh's boat may last many years but I'd keep an eye on it and put a longer or longer and wider back plate on if any cracking or anything looking like cracking appeared. And of course all should be fine if the big loads are applied to a well backed dedicated cleat in some other place.

Rodger's fix looks real nice and he's probably good to go for the distance and my comments are basically ranging to the idealistic.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:47 PM   #28
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In my case the size of the backer is dictated by the flat surface available. I am restricted to that size. As far as "ignoring Ski's coment". I highly respect his input and he has helped me many times before. Using the six ten, thickened epoxy, that you refer to as "goo", was what was recommended to me by a highly respected fiberglass company after they looked at it. I would have gone with replacing the core if it was a bigger section but when we found that it was so much smaller than what I initially thought then it made sense to go with this approach. So now I have 1.5 inches of solid fiberglass. Not bad in my book and I am pleased with it. As stated in so many other post I always use the cleats to hold the load, not the windlass. This is also stated in the Maxwell manual. Thanks again to all for your inputs. On to the next project.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:28 AM   #29
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impregnated with an epoxy resin"

UV eats epoxy , so paint it after you are done.
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