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Old 11-05-2014, 03:33 PM   #1
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Drilling holes for teak plugs

I want to drill blind holes to accept teak plugs and I can't source suitable drill bits. The pic shows a bit purchased in the UK many years ago and well past it's prime. Google is my friend, but I need to know the right search term. I don't want the combination drills that cut the screw-hole and the hole for the plug at the same time. Forstner bits are somewhat unwieldy when only drilling a hole 1/2" deep. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:38 PM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr. S. W.L. Fuller Inc.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:43 PM   #3
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And to make plugs, http://www.woodcraft.com/category/PA...s.aspx?start=0
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:53 PM   #4
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Greetings,
Mr. d. I have a set (4 pc.) of these and with a drill press, they are a treat to use. Wouldn't like to try them by hand though.

They actually cut a plug with a slight taper. Now, the next thing you might want is: Buy Takumi Kugihiki Dowel Saw, Model 10-2810 at Woodcraft.com

Dowel like a...

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Old 11-05-2014, 04:24 PM   #5
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So true, I'd suggest a drill press as well. I have a few of the Japanese saws, love'em.
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Old 11-05-2014, 04:26 PM   #6
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You want to drill homes in a piece of wood so you can insert matching wooden plugs right? I drilled a couple dozen using nothing more sophisticated than a brad point bit with a stop attached.

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Old 11-05-2014, 04:45 PM   #7
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The Brad points might do it but I think you're looking for something called a counterbore .
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Old 11-05-2014, 04:55 PM   #8
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I use Forstner bits for the most part. Even for the small holes.
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Old 11-05-2014, 05:11 PM   #9
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Greetings,
Mr. r. I'm so distraught. Nobody reads my posts (post #2) or follows my links (also post #2)...


On the other hand....

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Old 11-05-2014, 05:17 PM   #10
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Greetings,
Mr. r. I'm so distraught. Nobody reads my posts (post #2) or follows my links (also post #2)...
Sorry, I thought it was just a link to a company, not to the particular product. Brad point bits are available locally at home centers and hardware stores.

Don't feel bad, people ignore my posts as well. What really hurts is when I suggest something and people ignore my post, then later someone posts the very same thing and someone thanks them for it. Oh well.................
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Old 11-05-2014, 10:39 PM   #11
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Bradpoints work well, as do forstner. Woodcrafters is good resourse. I also use tapered combination drill countersinking bits. For cutting plugs I use mortising bits in a drill press. If you have a lot of plugs to cut this the fast way. I set a stop on the drill press and cut a few hundred in a few minutes in 3/4 stock. Then band saw or use a table saw to cut them off the 3/4 stock.
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Old 11-06-2014, 05:44 AM   #12
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Greetings,
Mr. S. Don't mortising cut a straight plug as opposed to tapered? Fine if you're going into a tapered hole but if replacing pugs in an existing hole which may be slightly damaged or out of round I would think tapered plugs would fit better. No?
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:29 AM   #13
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One trick when installing the plug is to dip it in old varnish.

Not 5200, epoxy or anything else like glue..

When time to remove the plug comes a wood screw driven in the center will crack it up, usually with no damage to the deck.
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:01 AM   #14
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Greetings,
Mr. d. I have a set (4 pc.) of these and with a drill press, they are a treat to use. Wouldn't like to try them by hand though.

They actually cut a plug with a slight taper.
I bought a set of those from Harbor Freight. POS!

I ended up buying pre-made plugs off the Internet in my choice of wood very inexpensively.
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:22 AM   #15
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I generally use a Spade bit and a drilling jig device to limit the depth and prevent side runout.
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Old 11-06-2014, 09:45 AM   #16
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Here's my assortment. For cutting plugs, a drill press is a must. For the decks/furniture, one of the issues, is to find a counter sink that you can adjust the drill length shallow enough. The one on the right was made by Stanley and is now discontinued but you may be able to find one. The typical deck screw from what I have found seems to be a #8.
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Old 11-06-2014, 12:00 PM   #17
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I bought a set of those from Harbor Freight. POS!

I ended up buying pre-made plugs off the Internet in my choice of wood very inexpensively.
That's because you got them from HF. :-)

Better quality ones cut very nice plugs. But as you noted, you can pick up precut plugs pretty inexpensively.
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Old 11-06-2014, 01:32 PM   #18
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He doesnt need plugs, he needs holes. I sent my wife to the hardware store for a box of holes once. Maybe you guys could find him a good place, locally of course, for the appropriate size holes. Until then he needs a good way to make his own, preferably without the pilot drill. The bung hole jig is still the best way I know to do it.
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Old 11-06-2014, 02:01 PM   #19
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He doesnt need plugs, he needs holes. I sent my wife to the hardware store for a box of holes once. Maybe you guys could find him a good place, locally of course, for the appropriate size holes. Until then he needs a good way to make his own, preferably without the pilot drill. The bung hole jig is still the best way I know to do it.
Not only does he need holes, he needs teak holes. These are very hard to come by locally.

There are many different ways to make holes in wood. We choose what works for us with the tools we have. I do a lot of woodworking and have all the tools listed. For me, the brad point bit with the adjustable stop seemed the simplest and produced a nice, clean hole. My experience with paddle bits is that they are better suited to construction than fine woodworking but whatever works for each individual is fine.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:44 PM   #20
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Correct, spade dits need to be sharp, and spun fast. Otherwise they leave a ragged hole. Forstner bits are easier to use and leave a better cut.
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