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Old 08-03-2015, 07:11 PM   #41
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Eric, I don't have a problem with you using steel clamps but just in case you're interested, ABA makes the same style in 304 stainless. I use them on small fuel lines.
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Old 08-03-2015, 08:58 PM   #42
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To be clear, IMO good stainless clamps are only necessary in below the waterline places exposed to salt water. Even with stainless I spray them with Corrosion X. Crappy "stainless" clamps don't belong anywhere IMO.
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Old 08-03-2015, 09:02 PM   #43
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That's wonderful Parks.
Need to bookmark this on my computer.
Perhaps they have bigger ones than my current source.
Thank you much.

Cal,
That "Corrosion X" sounds like good stuff to have.
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Old 08-03-2015, 10:02 PM   #44
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Someone like Eric who keeps an eye on maintenance should be fine with non stainless clamps.
Thanks NS for identifying the clamps as "jubilee" type. My Peugeot dealer/mechanic friend years ago thought they were great clamps applying even pressure, and, as they came on Peugeots...
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Old 08-04-2015, 12:08 AM   #45
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Eric--- Those are good clamp designs in my opinion. I used the same style for attaching the new sight tubing for our saddle tanks to the upper and lower fittings on each tank. I double clamped, too, but flipped them opposite so the clamp bolt on one is on the other side of the tubing to the other one but with the heads facing the same direction. The flipped thing is a good theory which in practice probably doesn't really improve anything, particularly with this style of clamp.

FWIW, this style of clamp is available in stainless steel if one wants them in that material. We got ours at Fisheries Supply in Seattle.
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Old 08-04-2015, 12:30 AM   #46
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Some really cool clamps come from oetiker. You need special tools to apply them but they hold. I think a lot of the problems with hose clamps in general comes from inconsistent application. Too tight and they fail. Too loose and they fail. Also, some things need to be retightened after the hose warms up.
It always amazes me that for every hose I have seen leak I have had to cut the same hose off in another instance to get it apart.
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Old 08-04-2015, 06:25 AM   #47
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"spraying diesel fuel 1,600 times per minute"

WOW! You were cruising at 3200RPM?
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Old 08-04-2015, 07:10 AM   #48
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"spraying diesel fuel 1,600 times per minute"

WOW! You were cruising at 3200RPM?
Ah, yes, I forgot, it's a four stroke engine. So, 800 times per minute rather than 1,600. Still, that's a lot of spray if not discovered quickly.
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Old 08-04-2015, 07:26 AM   #49
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My pin hole put out about a pint of diesel rumming all day for several days

We kept smelling it and I would find some in the drip pan...but it would be so fine and dry by the time I would do my end of day checks...didn't find it till maybe the third or fourth day as the mist was more visable.

The second pipe break I had was at the nut right on top of the injector pump. It was easier to find as it looked just like arterial bleeding. A normal sized drop would shoot up an inch or two from the injector pump, but fortunately no atomization danger. I tried tightening, thinking it was loose...but when rock tight.I gused anot her isue and limpedance another hour to the closet marina. It was about a quart in the pan by the time I shut her down.
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Old 08-05-2015, 07:06 AM   #50
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Old diesel injection is very modest pressure 1500 to 1800 PSI or so.

Even so it is good practice never to stick flesh near the stream.

In the usual 3000 PSI or newer 5000PSI hyd systems a pin hole will puncture the skin , can you say blood poisioning ?

Not sure if a wimpy 1800PSI with a pin hole would puncture , but am not willing to experiment.
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Old 08-05-2015, 07:16 AM   #51
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Not sure if a wimpy 1800PSI with a pin hole would puncture , but am not willing to experiment.
Fluid injection injuries can occur at pressures as low as 150 psi. If it is diesel fuel or hydraulic oil, the injury can result in severe damage to fingers or hands and may even lead to amputation within a day or two of injury if not immediately treated.

There is no such thing as wimpy when it comes to that stuff! It is a very serious consideration when working around your fuel injection system.
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Old 08-05-2015, 09:56 AM   #52
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Quote:
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Eric--- Those are good clamp designs in my opinion. I used the same style for attaching the new sight tubing for our saddle tanks to the upper and lower fittings on each tank. I double clamped, too, but flipped them opposite so the clamp bolt on one is on the other side of the tubing to the other one but with the heads facing the same direction. The flipped thing is a good theory which in practice probably doesn't really improve anything, particularly with this style of clamp.

FWIW, this style of clamp is available in stainless steel if one wants them in that material. We got ours at Fisheries Supply in Seattle.
Marin,
It's nice to find nice things that work.
I didn't "flip them" or install at 180 degrees because I reasoned that w the clamping all the way around flipping wasn't needed. Also relatively low clamping pressure on barbed fittings played a role.
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Old 08-05-2015, 10:20 AM   #53
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Fluid injection injuries can occur at pressures as low as 150 psi. If it is diesel fuel or hydraulic oil, the injury can result in severe damage to fingers or hands and may even lead to amputation within a day or two of injury if not immediately treated.

There is no such thing as wimpy when it comes to that stuff! It is a very serious consideration when working around your fuel injection system.
When I was flying C-130s, there was a maintenance technician that lost his hand due to a 3000psi hydraulic leak. Modern common rail engines have fuel pressures in excess of 20,000psi. Imagine what that would do to you.
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Old 08-05-2015, 11:45 AM   #54
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When I was flying C-130s, there was a maintenance technician that lost his hand due to a 3000psi hydraulic leak. Modern common rail engines have fuel pressures in excess of 20,000psi. Imagine what that would do to you.
My JD tractor manual has warnings all over the place about hydraulic leaks. They have an 800 number for the doctor to call if one is injured by the pressurized hydraulic fluid. Seems like they really want the ER doc to call them. There are specific warnings about using one's hand to find a leak. I think my tractors hydraulics are 2,000 PSI which is not something to play with at all. I have pinched and cut a hose with the 4n1 front loader bucket and it was not pretty. Scary actually.

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Old 08-06-2015, 08:24 AM   #55
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I am curious, why such crazy high pressures? Why does it take pressures like this to atomize the fuel? Inquiring minds want to learn.
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Old 08-06-2015, 05:29 PM   #56
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Injection pressures are high because the fuel has to be atomized. The higher the hole the finer the hole size the fuel has to travel thru and thus the better the atomization. The closer to a gas diesel fuel is the easier it is to ignite and the bigger the burn.
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Old 08-06-2015, 08:03 PM   #57
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I know of an 18yo. apprentice at a BMW workshop who lost an eye due to brake fluid which escaped from the power brake booster. Very sad event, especially for a young man.
We fractured the line from the lift pump to the on engine final filters of one of the Lehmans. It sure sprays out, makes a mess, and quickly.
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