Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-28-2018, 08:52 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
clynn's Avatar
 
City: Memphis
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ivory Lady
Vessel Model: 46 Jefferson
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 275
DIY Bottom Job - Your Experience

In my area, we don't have a ton of pleasure boats. I'm a member of the local yacht club and we have a lift, but one of the guys that used to do bottom jobs moved away and the other is semi-retired. I wanted to have mine done last year, but couldn't find anyone to do the work, so I'm seriously considering doing it myself this spring. It doesn't sound like a complicated job...lift, pressure wash, sand, tape, paint, paint, paint, splash. I get that it's a dirty job, but I'm not worried about that. I have an orbital sander, will get paint suits, and a respirator. It's a '46 footer, so i'll probably try to hire some labor help. I've sanded/refinished woodwork and repainted stripes above the waterline in the past to give some idea of experience.

I'd love to hear from others that have done this before. I enjoy working on my boat and saving money. Is this a crazy idea? What was your experience? Are there any particularly good instructional videos or books that you're aware of?

Thanks for any input!
Chris
__________________
Advertisement

clynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 08:58 AM   #2
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: USA
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1,356
It’s physicaly demanding but other wise very simple. Plan on two days and get two high school kids to help. Use their labor as much as possible so you don’t get tired. Be fresh when you paint, when tired you tend to glob the paint On.

A lot depends on sluffing paints vs modified epoxy paints and if the old paint is sticking to the bottom well.
__________________

tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 09:12 AM   #3
Guru
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 831
Assuming you use ablative type bottom paint, there is usually no need to "sand". We used to paint a fresh coat every spring after Winter storage. After "sanding" a couple of times, I came to realize all that is needed is to scrub the bottom with a coarse scrungy abrasive pad (with handle attached). Also, if you decide to use a power sander, be careful you do not damage the barrier layer between the hull and the anti fouling paint. Lastly, the paint dust is toxic to humans and wild life, so all marinas in this area require dust control while sanding using a vacuum attached to the sander, plus wear a mask.
Chrisjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 09:37 AM   #4
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,648
As noted above, the paint dust is toxic. I know that this is totally selfish, but I would rather someone else bears the exposure risk and not me. So I have always had the yard to my bottom jobs.


And I have always used top of the line Interlux or Pettit bottom paint. I get three years between jobs.

David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 10:04 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: USA
Vessel Model: OA 440
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 380
We painted our 44 last Spring. The previous ablative paint was still serviceable, but getting thin in a few places. Upon winter haulout in September 2016 (Great Lakes) the storage crew left the boat hanging (high) in the travel lift straps for a couple of hours to allow me to power wash. Keeping the nozzle very close to the surface was very effective at creating a clean, slightly etched surface (on ablative paint). Then I scuffed with a coarse Scotchbrite type pad on a dry wall sanding pole. No power tools needed for ablative. Then a final power wash to clean off dust. That process took about 2.5 hours. I wore a rubberized painters coverall (with a hood),rubber gloves, and a respirator. Managed to stay mostly dry while working under the dripping nasties. All supplies were purchased at Home depot or Menards. By the way, the marina required that the boat be positioned over a 3x3x6 ' concrete block as a safety measure in the event of a sling failure. The boat was then blocked inside the storage building and left over the winter (Great Lakes).

Last Spring I wiped and brushed off the cobwebs and accumulated dust and then taped and masked (1/2 day). That afternoon my spouse helped with moving the plastic drop "cloth" and keeping the paint tray full. The first coat of ablative applied over existing scuffed ablative sucked a lot of paint and was fairly slow going. We finished late that afternoon. That paint had a required cure time before recoating...basically over night. The second coat went on much more quickly, took less paint, and went on with much less effort. We were finished by noon the second day. I used Interlux ablative with high solids content....exactly three gallons for our 44. The rollers were 1/4" knap (I believe).

Total time including power wash and scuff was two eight hour days.
Rufus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 10:16 AM   #6
Guru
 
Russell Clifton's Avatar
 
City: Anacortes Wa.
Country: usa
Vessel Name: Sea Fever
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 552
I will be pulling a 49' next week and doing all the work myself, as I have done for the past 50 years. Don't forget to check for excessive play in the prop strut bushings and replace all of the anodes. This is also the time to service all the thru hull shut off valves if they are serviceable.

Check with your marina to see what the regulations are about sanding the bottom. Up here in the Northwest they are really,really strict about doing any sanding on the bottom, also have never seen a place that let's you pressure wash the bottom of your own boat. They may even have a special price for doing all the prep work. Just let them pull it, pressure wash it, and move it to the yard and block it up. You take it from there.
Russell Clifton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 10:36 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
clynn's Avatar
 
City: Memphis
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ivory Lady
Vessel Model: 46 Jefferson
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 275
Thank you all for your very helpful feedback. In regards to the yard comments, we have a floating lift. As a member, you get a free up and down every year, but pay by the day for it to sit there. They have a pressure washer you can rent or you can bring your own. I'm not sure there are any other regulations. I've attached a pic of my previous boat being painted on the lift I'll be using.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1857.jpg
Views:	105
Size:	102.5 KB
ID:	74587   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1863.JPG
Views:	107
Size:	112.3 KB
ID:	74588  
clynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 10:44 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: USA
Vessel Model: OA 440
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russell Clifton View Post
Check with your marina to see what the regulations are about sanding the bottom. Up here in the Northwest they are really,really strict about doing any sanding on the bottom, also have never seen a place that let's you pressure wash the bottom of your own boat. They may even have a special price for doing all the prep work. Just let them pull it, pressure wash it, and move it to the yard and block it up. You take it from there.
The last time the marina power washed our boat (about 8 years ago), the kid operating the power washer destroyed large patches of the ablative paint. I've insisted on doing it myself ever since...and the management is happy to have their staff member back to block boats. By the way, there really isn't any sanding as such...just washing and scuffing. Left coast, I guess. If I want it done right, I do I myself.
Rufus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 10:44 AM   #9
Veteran Member
 
City: Maryville, TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: malu lani
Vessel Model: Albin 27 FC
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 92
Chris, I've been doing my own bottoms for lotsa years. My latest boat is only 27' long so it's a breeze compared to my previous 42' sail and 44' trawler. The marinas here are a lot more tolerant of DIY. Harbortowne Marina here in Vonore recommended I pressure wash my own bottom also. They only require a tarp under the boat during the painting. If I want to sand it, I have to enclose it with plastic, which is cheap, easy and quick. I've always used a good ablative so haven't had to sand it since my first paint about 4 years ago. I no longer have barnacle problems on our inland waters so it's a LOT easier. The advice about a couple of high schoolers is good if you are going to scrub it. I'm 77 now so I do get pretty tired but I can do it all in a day. Ben
tego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 11:41 AM   #10
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,461
Greetings,
Mr. c. Completely stripped down, to essentially bare wood, a 34' wooden boat many years ago-Hellish job. Subsequent vessel (34' Marine Trader) painted in the spring after a fall pressure wash-Purgatory-ish job.

Now, don't much care what the cost. I pay to have everything done. I'd rather rebuild a dozen heads than do it again.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 11:51 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Gabe n Em's Avatar
 
City: Point Judith, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: In Sanity
Vessel Model: 1981 Mainship 40'
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 404
We do almost everything ourselves. HOWEVER: when we did the bottom last year (a first on this boat), we agreed we'd pay someone else to do it next time. We paid about $1000 in paint, PPE, and yard costs (lift, storage, etc). They told us they could do the whole thing for a little north of $2000. Totally worth it! as we had to do this after 8 hours of day-job and while living aboard in the marina. (carrying the dog down a ladder to go for a walk). It ended up taking almost a week. A very, unpleasant, week. Yes, you can do it faster if you take those days off, probably closer to 3 days. still a lot of upside down, nasty, work.

at least an extra boat buck though....
Gabe n Em is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 12:09 PM   #12
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,810
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
As noted above, the paint dust is toxic. I know that this is totally selfish, but I would rather someone else bears the exposure risk and not me. So I have always had the yard to my bottom jobs.


And I have always used top of the line Interlux or Pettit bottom paint. I get three years between jobs.

David
__________________
Codger 1941.. Constant pursuit of the ultimate SoCal Cruising boat.
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 12:10 PM   #13
Guru
 
City: Fairport
Country: United States
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,546
My only comment is that ablative type paints have given me very short life on all u/w bronze and stainless. Tabs, props, shaft, rudders. I move to Trinidad on the metal, ablative on the FG.
Your waters may vary. Are we talking fresh water usage here?
diver dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 01:24 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
clynn's Avatar
 
City: Memphis
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ivory Lady
Vessel Model: 46 Jefferson
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by diver dave View Post
My only comment is that ablative type paints have given me very short life on all u/w bronze and stainless. Tabs, props, shaft, rudders. I move to Trinidad on the metal, ablative on the FG.
Your waters may vary. Are we talking fresh water usage here?
Yes, fresh water.
clynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 01:36 PM   #15
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 4,578
I have painted qiute a few of our boats. From doing epoxy barrier coats to simply adding another coat of ablative bottom paint. It is relatively easy technically and relatively hard physically. It is easier on a hard surface so you can use a creeper to roll around underneath the boat. Our storage yard is crushed gravel and not conducive to using a creeper so the yard brings our boat to our house and puts it on the driveway. I spread a plastic tarp on the drive since I always end up spilling some paint. I second the advise of hireing some young labor but I always watch closely so that the work gets done the way I want it.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 02:13 PM   #16
Guru
 
Max Simmons's Avatar
 
City: Everett, WA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 38'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
I Our storage yard is crushed gravel and not conducive to using a creeper so the yard brings our boat to our house and puts it on the driveway.
That would be awesome!
Max Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 02:38 PM   #17
Guru
 
Besslb's Avatar
 
City: Cary NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 42'
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 764
We have painted our boat bottoms a couple of times. We have sanded it only once. (and that was the 35Fter) We'll never do that again. Same for waxing the hull. Tried that once....got about 5 feet on either side of the bow before giving up.

Everyone has different tolerances. There's stuff ya pay for and stuff ya don't.
Besslb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 04:46 PM   #18
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,033
I'll tackle anything and have done in the past but these days antifouling and asbestos removal are 2 jobs best done by others.
Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 06:51 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 19,415
in my opinipn, the best reason to use a self polishing or ablative paint....

pressure wash, let dry and paint.

no toxic experience, and if the yard hangs you high for pressure washing, and you use a long handle with a roller, even old guys can do this simple job.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 07:13 PM   #20
TF Site Team
 
Pack Mule's Avatar
 
City: Paris,TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: William
Vessel Model: Outer reef 32
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,333
I’ve done a 32 ‘ sailboat before in my backyard when we lived In Memphis. It went pretty good but I only had a couple of small blisters to deal with . Once you’re through sanding make sure the hull is clean and free of dust before painting .
__________________

__________________
Marty
Pack Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012