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Old 03-31-2014, 11:57 AM   #21
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Put the dehumidifier in a cool location. Some of the energy used is to cool the air to the saturation point (dewpoint) and the rest of the energy is used to condense the water. The cooler the location, the less energy is used on the first part of the process. This assumes the air in the boat has at least some circulation.
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Old 03-31-2014, 12:32 PM   #22
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OK, with two votes for the cooler location, I'll go with that. Since hot air rises, as I understand it, that would mean the lower the better (so long as above deck,I mean).
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Old 03-31-2014, 01:27 PM   #23
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John, I think it's more a function of temperature than elevation. The chart below shows the effect on relative humidity with a change in temperature or pressure. As the temp decreases 10C, (from State B to State A) the RH increases 17%. This higher % of water per volume of air is easier to remove using the dehumidifier.



I use calcium carbonate pellets to dehumidify my boat during periods of non-use in the winter. I notice more water in the water collectors when the heat is turned off than when I run the heaters in my absence. I attribute this to the lower RH with the heaters on.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:02 PM   #24
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We use two large household sized dehumidifiers we bought at Home Depot. As our boat is compartmentalized into fore and aft sections below decks, we needed two. And as we live and work aboard 24/7, we wanted large capacity. Running them each about 4 hours every few days takes A LOT of water out of the air. A few gallons a week at least.

We also use the H2Out reusable dehumidifiers throughout the boat. Here's a video we made on the Pittman award-winning Space Dryers: H2Out Space Dryers
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:11 PM   #25
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Started using an EvaDry 2200 this past fall. It has worked great. I was going to install a drain, but since we check the boat every week, I've never had it more than half full when I empty it. That may change over the summer. The advantage over a compressor dehumidifier is size and noise. The evadry is light and very queit. however, compressors will remove a lot more moisture. The 2200 seems fine for our 34 foot tug, but for a 45 foot boat you would probably need to run two of them. Practical sailor gave a positive review of the evadry where a large compressor model wasn't necessary. The chemical desicants may be fine for small compartments, but are not really feasable for an entire boat. Lastly, our AC does have a dehumdify mode, but I don't like leaving it running during the week when we are not around becuase I worry about it sucking up debris and burning out the pump.
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Old 09-25-2015, 04:27 PM   #26
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I'll bump this thread. We had more "Pineapple Expresses" go through the PNW last year than I can ever remember. The "Dries Air" chemical anti-desiccants were overtaxed. I just purchased a Garrison dehumidifier: 28 pint (13 litre) 298 watts (3.2 amps). I have it running at home in the basement right now and it removed 1 litre in about an hour. I intend to set it on the Galley counter and run a hose into the sink (through hull above the water line). Another option is to set it in the companion way between the staterooms and have the hose run into the sink in the amidships head.

We just got back from a trip with guests and found that the bottom bunk in the guest state room was quite wet under the mattress. I intend to get some of that Hypervent mesh to put under the mattress. Expensive stuff at $14Cdn a linear foot!

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Old 09-27-2015, 05:43 PM   #27
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As an aside to the discussion, I was told that the water collected from a dehumidifier if the collection is clean can be used as distilled water for battery use.

Is this true?
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:27 PM   #28
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As an aside to the discussion, I was told that the water collected from a dehumidifier if the collection is clean can be used as distilled water for battery use.

Is this true?

Yes. In theory...if the collection is clean. Dust and other airborne contaminants could be an issue. Given distilled water is cheap, I wouldn't be using reclaimed water from the dehumidifier.


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Old 09-27-2015, 07:23 PM   #29
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Guys

My wife read somewhere and put it in the boat and it works!!!!!
It is CHEAP, you can change it whenever you want and you can find it everywhere.

Get yourself a wicker basket, cover it with absorving paper and cover it up with wood charcoal. (the one you put in your BBQ pit.)

Use as many baskets as you want. The charcoal will absorve most of the air moisture.

Try, don't be shy
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Old 09-27-2015, 07:47 PM   #30
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Guys

My wife read somewhere and put it in the boat and it works!!!!!
It is CHEAP, you can change it whenever you want and you can find it everywhere.

Get yourself a wicker basket, cover it with absorving paper and cover it up with wood charcoal. (the one you put in your BBQ pit.)

Use as many baskets as you want. The charcoal will absorve most of the air moisture.

Try, don't be shy
Fernando, have you got pictures of this? Sounds like a perfect solution if the footprint is small. That's why I like Dri-Z-Air.



I buy calcium chloride pellets that are sold online for ice melting in less fortunate climate areas. During the summer, this stuff is dirt cheap. Just try not to order during blizzards. They really price gouge in the winter.

Charcoal briquettes in a basket sounds much better!!! Do you need to place the baskets in a sink or on a platter to catch water like the Dri-Z-Air does?
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Old 09-27-2015, 08:11 PM   #31
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Greetings,
Mr. FW. I think Mr. P means plain charcoal, NOT briquettes. I think briquettes have other additives (think coal-yes THAT coal) to the base charcoal.
http://ngureco.hubpages.com/hub/How-...nd-Composition
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Old 09-27-2015, 08:30 PM   #32
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here is our setup -

Dehumidifier from Lowe's on a timer to run for couple hours each day while we are gone. The hose drains to the galley sink. I keep a digital temp and humidity gauge on the lower helm that records the max ratings while we are gone and tends to stay below 65%. Picked the location based on easiest way to drain.
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Old 09-29-2015, 04:57 PM   #33
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I'll bump this thread. We had more "Pineapple Expresses" go through the PNW last year than I can ever remember. The "Dries Air" chemical anti-desiccants were overtaxed. I just purchased a Garrison dehumidifier: 28 pint (13 litre) 298 watts (3.2 amps). I have it running at home in the basement right now and it removed 1 litre in about an hour. I intend to set it on the Galley counter and run a hose into the sink (through hull above the water line). Another option is to set it in the companion way between the staterooms and have the hose run into the sink in the amidships head.

We just got back from a trip with guests and found that the bottom bunk in the guest state room was quite wet under the mattress. I intend to get some of that Hypervent mesh to put under the mattress. Expensive stuff at $14Cdn a linear foot!

Jim

Which is why I throw this on top of the spare bunk before throwing down the mattress: True Blue 20 in. x 30 in. x 1 in. Budget Washable Filter-0120301.1 - The Home Depot

cheap and works fine.. if in doubt, use 2 layers, it is still cheaper. Under the main mattress (live aboard) we use curved bed slats from Ikea with a mattress cover (cover is kind of plastic like, but you get used to it)
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Old 09-29-2015, 06:32 PM   #34
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Which is why I throw this on top of the spare bunk before throwing down the mattress: True Blue 20 in. x 30 in. x 1 in. Budget Washable Filter-0120301.1 - The Home Depot

cheap and works fine.. if in doubt, use 2 layers, it is still cheaper. Under the main mattress (live aboard) we use curved bed slats from Ikea with a mattress cover (cover is kind of plastic like, but you get used to it)

Yes...well...I sprung for the Hypervent. Furnace filters could have been a workable alternative. I thought it was going to be the same stuff that the PO put under the mattress in the master stateroom, but, it's not as thick. I needed 7' of the Hypervent. It's 39" wide.

Update. I got the dehumidifier going in the galley. The humidity dropped from 88% down to 56%. I'm going to temporarily set it up in one state room at a time and then the Pilothouse, before I leave it full time in the galley. That way it will remove all that moisture pent up over the summer.


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Old 10-06-2015, 11:59 AM   #35
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How about the engine room. Do you use a dehumidifier in that area? How do you dispose of the water collected. If you leave a hatch open from the engine room to the salon will the dehumidifier work down there? Thanks guys...
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Old 10-06-2015, 03:58 PM   #36
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To be effective, you'd have to close off the ER vents, otherwise you will be attempting to dehumidify the state of Louisiana.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:13 PM   #37
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To be effective, you'd have to close off the ER vents, otherwise you will be attempting to dehumidify the state of Louisiana.
Makes sense!

I remember from last winter the condensation all over the engines and other systems. Need to rid that area of all that moisture. I can't go with heaters...scares the b jesus out of me to leave electric heaters on in the bilge area.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:29 PM   #38
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I use an Extreme heater in my engine compartment. It does help keep condensation down in the winter. It is designed for use in an engine compartment, so I don't worry too much about it. There are other boat safe heaters out there, that work just as well.

I don't think electric dehumidifiers work very well in temperatures below 50F.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:47 PM   #39
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Makes sense!

I remember from last winter the condensation all over the engines and other systems. Need to rid that area of all that moisture. I can't go with heaters...scares the b jesus out of me to leave electric heaters on in the bilge area.
Think about block heaters. The ones on my Detroits could keep the whole lower level of the boat dry as well as warm.
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Old 10-06-2015, 05:20 PM   #40
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Think about block heaters. The ones on my Detroits could keep the whole lower level of the boat dry as well as warm.

Yes, I've thought about a block heater, but I understand they use a fair bit of power. I've only got 20 amp power right now, so don't want to be tripping breakers when I'm away.


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