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Old 04-13-2011, 09:49 AM   #21
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RE: Deck delamination

I'll report back my findings when I return from the boat this weekend.
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Old 04-14-2011, 01:52 AM   #22
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RE: Deck delamination

A quick thought, how do the top of your fuel tanks look. the filler caps for both water & fuel are some of the usual suspects in water seepage issues.
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Old 04-14-2011, 07:07 AM   #23
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RE: Deck delamination

Quote:
shrimp wrote:
A quick thought, how do the top of your fuel tanks look. the filler caps for both water & fuel are some of the usual suspects in water seepage issues.
Same for me. When I removed the original fuel tanks, I was able to pull out the filler caps by simply pushing on them from beneath, without even removing the screws!

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Old 04-14-2011, 08:04 AM   #24
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RE: Deck delamination

Thanks guys, no problems with fuel, water or waste fill caps, but will give a second look.
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Old 04-14-2011, 10:27 PM   #25
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Deck delamination

I Had a 2' patch around a bolt hole in my back deck. The moisture meter pegged. I used it to estimate the size of the area.

I dealt with it by cleaning the edge of the plywood with a dremel so there was no sealer or dirt at the exposed edge.

I rigged a muffin/computer fan so it blew through the hole to carry moisture away. You don't need a hurricane, just a steady flow of air to carry moisture off quickly and positively.

Then I rigged several heat lamps (175 & 250W) on several mickey mouse holders (2 x 4) to keep the lamps stable and above the deck about 16-18". Stuck around untill I was sure the deck was very warm but not hot enough to damage the glass or ply.

I made sure all the lamps were clustered around the hole to dry that area first. Then as that dried I moved the lamps further afield although clustered to keep the area warm. I kept one lamp aimed at the bolt hole to keep it warm and hasten evaporation.* It worked although it was about 2 weeks before I was able to be sure the ply was dry. I then sealed the hole with epoxy.

It took almost a week before I could really see that the moisture level was dropping as moisture moved from the wetter areas into the dry areas. The meter slowly dropped from a click as it pegged (+ 30%) to under 10%. I'm not done as there are 4 other holes to do this year although , thankfully, the meter show the water is only about 6" around each.

I had to rig a tarp to keep the rain off or I would lose a lamp when the rain nailed it.

If you have the time and can protect the area from the weather adequately you may be able to dry the deck out and stop any further damage. The water, even if you stop more entry, will continue to migrate.

I was just thinking that the application of a shop vac to the underside of the hole may pull liquid water more quickly than the fan and heat initially. You likely will have to close the top of the hole somehow (mickey mouse). I haven't tried this, it's just an idea for whatever it's worth.

It may also be worth using the meter to find the farthest downhill point the water has reached and try drill a hole underneath to see if there is liquid water that will exit which should help the rest of the dry out.

Good luck
Clark.




-- Edited by C lectric on Thursday 14th of April 2011 10:30:04 PM
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Old 04-15-2011, 10:38 PM   #26
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Deck delamination

I don't really know if the wood is solid all the way where it was wet. The area around the bolt hole was still solid wood, not punky or rotten. I probed it as well as I could. It made the dremel and its cutter work hard. It was based on that and the deck seemed and sounded solid that I took a chance and attempted what I did.

I understand what you mean about the wood, once dried out, not really being the same.

I was not so lucky with the lazarette hatch cover in the same deck. The entry point was the lifting ring which was not sealed at all. That was balsa core and a good chunk of it was rotten and allowing the hatch to sag. Took it home and took off the entire back and rebuilt it. The back glass layer was only joined to the*top at the edge and in many places that join was broken. I laminated a solid glass perimeter about 4" all the way around, filled the rest with Divinycell and closed it up with a solid 4 " wide join for a solid attachment for the back and for the hardware to attach to with no entry to the core.


It sounds like you too are having fun (??) with your boat. At least it keeps us out of trouble, or does it?


-- Edited by C lectric on Friday 15th of April 2011 10:40:01 PM
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Old 04-16-2011, 07:19 AM   #27
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RE: Deck delamination

Before you fill or repair the affected area take a look at CPES and what they have to say.*

http://www.rotdoctor.com/products/cpes.html
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Old 04-17-2011, 09:35 PM   #28
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RE: Deck delamination

After doing some additional investigating I have some additional info to add.

The attached pictures shows pretty much the extent of the delamination. It appears water intrusion come from the following places. The starboard hole for the windlass retract switch, the hole the chain/rode retracts through, the hole to allow the windlass shaft to be mounted through the deck and the forward anchor cleat mounting holes.

Dull pinging was heard from the anchor cleat mounting holes to the location shown in the picture, about 5 feet back on the lower deck starboard side. Solid pinging was heard on the raised toe rail.

No delamination was noted or heard on the raised deck or on the port side of the lower deck area.

I drilled a couple of 1/4 inch holes from underneath but water did not gush out. The holes are pretty small and it was hard to tell if there was any moisture. I only have access from underneath the deck from the forward anchor cleat area to about where the raised deck area starts.

I do not have underneath access on the lower deck area from where the raised deck area starts back to where the blue arrow is. So my concern is how do I dry this area out and how will I know when it's dry?

*
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:34 AM   #29
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RE: Deck delamination

That's a fairly small degree of damp in that case. I doubt it is possible to really dry out damp core without stripping off the entire upper fibreglass layer, then re-coring. I suspect that sort of job is a cross between a can of worms and Pandora's box. If it was me, ( I know it isn't), I would just seal those breaches best you can and forget about it if there is no leaks inside, and there shouldn't be because you have another whole underside deck of fibreglass. Not a perfect solution, but hey...damp sandwich...dry sandwich, who's to know 'cept you? Just stop jumping up and down on the slightly springy area and get out there and have some fun. Remember that's what it's meant to be - and the flip side to that is..."if it ain't broke don't fix it". There's enough else to do on any boat that does show and must be done. It's not really structural, it's not a safety issue, so it's just a case of accepting your boat will NEVER be perfect. Speaking for myself, I've become sort of used to imperfection.
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:33 PM   #30
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Deck delamination

hmm.
Here is my take for what it is worth:
I don't see a lot of such delamntation on your model year 355 and I've sold several. Your surveyor should have really highlighted the fact that you have a good sized area of delamination prior to your purchasing but that is water under the bridge, er, water under the foredeck. When you go to sell, this issue will pop up again unless you fix it correctly now. If found at survey when you sell it will either cause a buyer to walk or a buyer to demand a price reduction to fix it. Even if the decks are not soft, the fact that it is pinging dull shows you it has a lot of water in there and you can't really hide that. It then becomes your decision- do I fix it correctly now which mist likely will cost a lot of $$$ and as mentioned, a potential can of worms, or go for the easy fix with epoxy and just wait it out and see what happens. In my experience, pandora's box or a can of worms rarely goes away over time. Left alone, that can of worms tends to become more of a big box of worms. I am of the opinion that repairs like this should be fully dealt with and fully fixed. That may or may not make economic sense for you to do that. Factors such as what you paid, etc. play into it and the overall cost/benefit analysis has to be done. *But coring issues don't just go away- they need to be fixed or they typically fester and get worse over time. *


-- Edited by Woodsong on Monday 18th of April 2011 12:53:27 PM
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Old 05-17-2011, 03:08 PM   #31
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RE: Deck delamination

Just a thought I fixed an area of cored deck 1' X 2' on an old 17' CC with Get Rot. Drilled holes from the topside through the wood but stopped before drilling through the bottom. Left it open for a week. Kept a shop vac on the boat and several times a day sucked out what I could. Then used the Get Rot. After it curred I beveled the holes and filled with Marine Tex. It did take more Get Rot that I anticapated but its a strond deck now. The water entered via holes drilled for a seat. I drilled them out removed wood from between the layers of glass, filled with Marine Tex, and reapplied the harware.
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Old 05-18-2011, 04:21 AM   #32
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RE: Deck delamination

Could the deck problem come from overloading of the GRP bow roller setup?

IF so a good bit of structural glassing will be required.

How much does the unit flex on pulling a good load?
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Old 05-22-2011, 07:28 AM   #33
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Deck delamination

FF,
The de-lamination occurred because the builder did not seal the windlass holes. The deck slopes downward from there so areas fwd of the windlass are not affected. The bow roller is OK.

Greg,
I think the area has become so large, about 6 sq ft that, that some major surgery will be required. I'm going to have a pro look at it and get opinions.


-- Edited by timjet on Sunday 22nd of May 2011 07:30:23 AM
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