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Old 10-10-2014, 11:56 AM   #41
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I'm discovering an important part of oil varnishing is using the best level of oil in the varnish. There is "long oil" and "short oil" varnish and of of course some are middle of the road. I bought some Epifanes and found it was a harder finish short oil varnish. Less susceptible to scuff marks ect but more susceptible to cracking and film failure.

So we went back to the long oil varnish we have used over the years for the better flexibility. But if you have a high quality pure Tung oil you can add it to a short oil varnish like Epifanes but then you'll loose some flexibility and hardness and knowing how much oil to add may be a problem.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:57 PM   #42
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Hey guys, do me a favor. Take a close up of the finished britework and save it.
Next year do the same. Then the third year do the same.

I want to see the comparisons.

Thank you very much
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Old 10-10-2014, 04:08 PM   #43
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Wood finish products (or not!) threads always seem to go the way of dual/single engines, anchors, or AIS...

That said, this month we stripped our cap rail. We put on 1 coat of Cetol Natural, and 2 coats of gloss. We had no idea what the original product was (I'm assuming Cetol, because the end result is very similar in color, and the drips from the PO were colored), but to strip it, a heat gun and a scraper were more than sufficient. We did follow up with a sanding at 80 grit.

We found that two people made the job MUCH more efficient. One person would work the heat gun, while the second would scrape. We could strip one side (34' long trawler) in an hour.



A few more images on our boat blog.
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Old 10-10-2014, 04:44 PM   #44
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Greetings,
Mr. mb. "... knowing how much oil to add may be a problem..." Now would you recommend straight 30wt tung oil or multigrade?
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Old 10-10-2014, 07:54 PM   #45
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Since you've been paying attention RT let's just Tung it.
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:44 PM   #46
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That's a mouth full
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:47 PM   #47
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I've always said there's britework and dullwork.

I prefer britework and a clear beautiful grain that lasts year after year with a brilliant shine. That's my goal that's what I have always done.

I don't like any finish that changes color or blurs the grain.
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:58 PM   #48
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I have some stuff you'd probably like Cap.
Mirror Coat. It's a clear bar finish. Two part epoxy.
I intend to put it on our dining room table.
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Old 11-03-2014, 11:12 AM   #49
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CPES Under Varnish

I'm tired of epoxies and expensive varnishes! I,m going to Le Tonkinois linseed varnish you get from hamilton marineI'm happy with the results!Click image for larger version

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Old 11-03-2014, 12:05 PM   #50
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Bluemoon,

A good friend of mine recommended Tonkinois; he recently started using it on his sailboat teak. His turned out a very dark grey, so I hesitated to try it. Also, it does not seem to be much available from my normal sources.

I loved the ease and "oil look" from the Teak Oil that I used, but have problems with it always "bleeding" a little on the white gelcoat whenever it gets wet.

Have you had any problems with bleeding? My friends boat did not seem to show any bleeding signs, though like I said, I did not like the dark grey color that it turned out.
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Old 11-03-2014, 01:50 PM   #51
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Welcome to Trawler Forum bluemoon43.

"Tonkinois" linseed varnish.

Most all varnish is made w either linseed oil or teak oil. Is "Tonkinois" a regular varnish or a special linseed oil finish?

I've done lots of linseed oil "varnishing" or oiling so I'm curious what is in the Tonkinois varnish besides linseed oil and in what quantities as I mixed my own oil finish.

We put 2 coats of McKloskie's spar varnish on our cap rail two mos ago that is admittedly just a beginning and it's already going south in spots. Intention was to get through the winter. May touch up w oil and turpentine (it's a natural anti-fungiside) and finish the job next summer.
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Old 11-03-2014, 02:11 PM   #52
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I've used mc varnish , didn't last on my boat hooks a month. As for dark color on teak that's ok with me. He needs to put another coat on ot get the shine Click image for larger version

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ID:	34127. The port door has the first coat,the hatch has the first coat. Sunday I put another coat on both, the hatch is dark,but with all wood it absorbs differently
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Old 11-03-2014, 02:27 PM   #53
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As long as I don't have to strip varnish every year I'm happy! The varnish companies have really sold their products. Wood expands and contracts paint or epoxy will not last with going on. There is a 65 foot yacht beside my boat the epoxy is breaking off the toe rail in chunks. Why use something that you have to repair every year or so , go enjoy your boat life is to short for that! I don't mind hitting the wood with 220 sand paper and put another coat of le Tonkinois on . Click image for larger version

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Old 11-03-2014, 02:37 PM   #54
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" I don't mind hitting the wood with 220 sand paper and put another coat of le Tonkinois"

That's what we usually do w McKloskie's Spar varnish. It's a long oil soft varnish.
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Old 11-03-2014, 02:42 PM   #55
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If you use linseed oil it will be dark used it on a swim step ladder it is dark. Do not use this product it will leave stains on your clothes. Le Tonkinois will not rub off on you
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Old 11-10-2014, 10:42 AM   #56
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The cost of neglect

I'm in the middle of refinishing the cover boards and toe rail on a 50' Gulf Star sail boat. Thank god the owner is working along side me as nobody would believe the time and effort involved. This boat had been neglected for at least 15 years and over sanded into a wavy mess. The process we are using involves a coat of Smiths penetrating epoxy, followed 24 hours later with a coat of west 105 epoxy, sanded and lightly coated with a follow up coat of Smiths penetrating epoxy and a single coat of Epifanes gloss while the smiths has just became touchable. The followed 24 hrs later a heavy coat of Epifanes gloss and 7 more coats following every 24 hours. This is the procedure recommended by West systems as the three year trouble free varnish job. I will post some pictures later this week. Last fall we had restored some of the cover boards with Smiths penetrating epoxy and 8 coats of Epifanes gloss. When the owner returned this fall the varnish was failing at the joints, the companion way I had build last year showed signs of turning white under the gloss as well. This was after 8 coats of Epifanes as well. This new approach for me is to use the West 105 as well as two coats of Smiths with all repairs done with West 105, cabosil, and color pigment after the first coat of Smiths. The techs at West Systems stated that Epifanes was by far the best varnish available. The teak toe rail was so wavy that I used my air long board to flatten and fair the faces before finish sanding with my Merka DA and Fein. There is a week of sanding alone on the two toe rails before the first coat of Smiths. When working with epoxies masking is imperative on all but flat surfaces as they run like mad as they heat up curing. This owner is one of those guys who does his research and is willing to do what ever it takes to do it right. Time will be the judge. My own boat has a little teak, the eight coats of Epifanes is showing signs already in less than one year. Delta heat and sun play hell on varnish when left exposed. All my handrails have covers for protection and hold up for several years between coats.
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:54 PM   #57
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My simple rule for any boat I own. NO EXTERIOR WOOD !!!!! I love the look of teak inside and I love the look of well kept exterior teak, on someone elses boat.
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