Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-24-2016, 12:52 AM   #1
Guru
 
North Baltic sea's Avatar
 
Country: Finland
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 913
check the vibration damper

you should check the vibration damper when replacing tightening the belts. if and when it breaks down sometimes makes a big engine of destruction

How It Works: Viscous Dampers, A.K.A. Harmonic Balancers - Diesel Army


__________________
Advertisement

North Baltic sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 01:52 AM   #2
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,214
That broken crank is a primitive sort, with no main bearing between those two cylinders..
__________________

Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 04:49 AM   #3
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,015
Wow. So many things I can learn by reading here.
I recently took my wife's car in for a little noise reduction. The surprise was to get the elastomeric dampener replaced. Until now I really didn't know how it worked or even why it was there.
__________________
Keith
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 05:50 AM   #4
Guru
 
North Baltic sea's Avatar
 
Country: Finland
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
That broken crank is a primitive sort, with no main bearing between those two cylinders..
Is this beter exaples and pleace read my first post link!



North Baltic sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:06 AM   #5
Guru
 
North Baltic sea's Avatar
 
Country: Finland
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 913
And this is what you look yours damper and video how cervice


https://youtu.be/TAtpZ0S95v4









https:



North Baltic sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:19 AM   #6
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Why are you so worked up over this?
Yes it can happen. Yes, any part, on any engine is there for a reason and if failed should be replaced but... when is the last time you have seen this failure?
Is there a specific trawler engine design that has a propensity to eat their harmonic balancer? The crankshafts you use as examples do not appear to be the typical forged type used in most Diesel engines.
I'm just curious where this warning is coming from.
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:42 AM   #7
Guru
 
North Baltic sea's Avatar
 
Country: Finland
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
Why are you so worked up over this?
Yes it can happen. Yes, any part, on any engine is there for a reason and if failed should be replaced but... when is the last time you have seen this failure?
Is there a specific trawler engine design that has a propensity to eat their harmonic balancer? The crankshafts you use as examples do not appear to be the typical forged type used in most Diesel engines.
I'm just curious where this warning is coming from.
Bruce

Hi Bruce and i whis you mery christmass

the idea came from discussions Turbo turbo or not. some fear Turbos than the monsters in the woods.

Each machine has its own risks and the damper is such that many people do not know or think about risk at sea. it is a small chance of un to succeed, but if it breaks the machine begins to shake and possibly break the crankshaft.

Apparently provoked a little, because Santa Claus will be there today and it is a little bit nervous.
North Baltic sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:44 AM   #8
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,802
I think this actually is pretty important to note because at least on some engines, replacement of the damper is a scheduled maintenance item. I know it is for sure on many Deere and Lugger engines. It's supposed to be inspected every 2000hr or 2 years, and replaced every 4500 hrs or 5 years.

In all my years messing with internal combustion engines, I never knew about this until a year or two ago. It might be that bigger diesels have bigger dampers, and failure is more catastrophic and/or the device wears more? I'm not sure, but I have now added it to my maintenance list for future years.

Oh, BTW, they are HEAVY, so be careful when changing. I had to pull mine to swap a leaking coolant pump and OMG. I was expecting it to be heavy, but not as heavy as it is. I would guess between 70 and 80lbs. It's nothing like a car engine damper that you can hold in one hand.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:44 AM   #9
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Baltic sea View Post
Hi Bruce and i whis you mery christmass

the idea came from discussions Turbo turbo or not. some fear Turbos than the monsters in the woods.

Each machine has its own risks and the damper is such that many people do not know or think about risk at sea. it is a small chance of un to succeed, but if it breaks the machine begins to shake and possibly break the crankshaft.

Apparently provoked a little, because Santa Claus will be there today and it is a little bit nervous.
Ok,
I was just curious...
You try to behave yourself, not long to go now!
Merry Christmas!!!
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 10:14 AM   #10
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,214
NBS- What the heck is that second crank?? I can't figure out cylinder pattern. Not your typical straight six or v6. VW VR6 maybe?? Mighty skinny between journals, got to be a gasser.

And yes, failed torsional damper can cause cranks to break.

Not usually a problem on trawlers as crank torsional vibes are usually only an issue up at high rpm and high loads.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 11:04 AM   #11
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,376
I had a boating friend who had a Perkins T6.3544 rebuilt by TAD in Virginia.
He gave them carte blanche to replace whatever was necessary.
The very first season with that engine the crankshaft broke between 1st and second journals. 130 hours on it.
Sent it back to TAD and they said it broke due to a worn damper that he should have replaced.
Well, it was TAD's choice to not replace. they did the labor for free but made him pay for a crank and a damper, and he lost most of the short New England boating season.
(And they sent it to him with the fuel lines installed backwards we had a hell of a time getting is started).
Pros don't always get it right either.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 11:34 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
BryanF's Avatar
 
City: Astoria
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florence A
Vessel Model: 47' Sutton
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 173
For the few dollars they cost we replace the damper when we do an overhaul. And while we see dampers that have run 20,000 hours with no problems we still replace them no matter what the hours on the engine. Just cheap insurance.
__________________

BryanF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012