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Old 05-12-2016, 10:38 PM   #21
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Just double nut them and apply a little pressure...if it doesnt turn easily, then stop.

But stainless in bronze should be no big deal...but then again I have never seen one of these stuffing boxes not come apart easily.

It could be cocked and jammed a bit...that's why I agree with Capt Bill that pulling the studs an tapping all around should free it up in a jiff.
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Old 05-12-2016, 11:45 PM   #22
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I know nothing about this but what I have read here.

However, GJ tells us that the rudder lifts when he uses the 'jaws of life' to lift the upper flange. Means that the upper flange might be threaded on is unlikely. WD 40, as noted above, is not much of a penetrating fluid, but over adequate time, is better than nothing. I'd clean up the WD 40 and move on to penetrating fluid and more time. I dislike using oils or penetrating fluids since they may compromise sealants and bonds, let alone future bonding of 'glass, paints and sealants; I try to not use an excess. Penetrating fluids are sold for the purpose of seeping into every nook and cranny; they'll seep into fiberglass and stink to high heaven for a great long time.

Prying against fiberglass doesn't seem like a good idea without some idea about how hard before damage occurs. Can you block the lifted rudder and upper flange up against the lower flange with something incompressible, like steel? Support the rudder loosely from below. Pad the top of the rudder shaft with brass or aluminum. Swat the rudder shaft down with adequate authority. Never use force, as my dad said, just a larger hammer.

My absolute worst, similar experience involved removing the propeller shaft from the flange at the engine. Much time, cursing, much inventing of levers and prys, I flung my wife across and down onto a gravel boatyard pavement, bent the propeller. I discovered after I cut the shaft to remove it that a PO had put the shaft into the flange with Loctite. Then I could not get the Cutless bearing out which was the object of the exercise. Removed the stern tube fitting, took it, the shaft parts and prop to a shop with adequate tools.

Good luck, and may the force be with you!
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Old 05-12-2016, 11:53 PM   #23
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Be careful with applying wedges, etc as the seal between the lower half of the stuffing box and the hull could be squeezed/pulled/damaged. It's probably under that big flange with the corner bolts. Maybe it's just a bead of 5200...


Odd that the shaft (which rotates freely in the bore) would lift when you applied the hydraulic spreader jaws to the "top hat". In any case it suggests that the bottom jaw of the spreader device was likely not on the upper lip of the lower half of the stuffing box, but rather on the retainer/flange...and the entire assembly including the rudder shaft was pulled up/squeezed against it. Either there's a shaft retaining device at the bottom of the stuffing box, or the stuffing is gripping the shaft in the longitudinal axis.
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Old 05-13-2016, 11:33 AM   #24
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If you had the space, you could use two small pullers, one on each stud.

If no space for the pullers, I would try Capt. Bill suggestion, possibly with two hammers simultaneously, one on each side rotating the flange in the same direction.
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Old 05-13-2016, 11:57 AM   #25
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If you are out of the water why not pull the rudder shaft? I'll bet the rudder shaft is bent and is keeping the upper part of the stuffing box 'cocked'. Removing the rudder shaft will open it up in any case. You'll be able to get "PB Blaster" directly inside in any case.

Then you can take a close look at your rudder shaft. Might be bent or a ring of crud has built up on it.
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Old 05-13-2016, 12:04 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Mr. al. Probably the best idea but without being able to disassemble the packing gland, pretty well impossible.
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Old 05-13-2016, 12:05 PM   #27
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WD40 does not dissolve corrosion.
It is almost useless but not quite useless.
People think it does dissolve rusts and they waste time using it.

My guess is the ram part that presses onto the packing is stuck in the main housing due to a massive amount of corrosion. The only thing to get i apart is heat from a torch or acid. Your flooding with wd40, will not let the acid work very well, so I would clean it really good with dish soap, dry it with a heat gun, then use and acidic rust buster PB blaster is easy to buy. Also you can try phosphoric acid or CLR citric acid. If you use Muriatic pool acid, just be real careful you got a good hose nearby.

The ram, top part, maybe you can work back and forth just a little with a real big pipe wrench. Likely a little bit of clearance even with the studs in there. And you can try whacking it with a hammer to loosen the corrosion.

IF you could remove the studs, then they will be out of the way. They likely screw into the base.
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Old 05-13-2016, 12:13 PM   #28
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You might be able to borrow or rent a VERY large pipe wrench to crack the flange by twisting it by whatever amount the studs clearance allows.
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Old 05-13-2016, 01:43 PM   #29
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You might be able to borrow or rent a VERY large pipe wrench to crack the flange by twisting it by whatever amount the studs clearance allows.
I thought that is why God made hammers?
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:16 PM   #30
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Thanks all for the suggestions. The piece came loose this am with lots of pounding while using the hydraulic ram. I am guessing that the overnight soak in WD-40 helped some.

Nicely, the stuffing box on the other rudder came off with very little effort.

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Old 05-13-2016, 05:54 PM   #31
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Greetings,
Mr. GJ. Good for you! Now, drop those rudders and clean everything up before repacking.
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Old 05-13-2016, 06:45 PM   #32
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Hammer time👍
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:59 PM   #33
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How about coating the parts with waterproof grease or some kind of coating that will seal the metal, then no more corrosion. Not all greases are water resistant.
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:11 AM   #34
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Two nuts jammed together on a stud create wrenching flats without buggering the threads.
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:40 AM   #35
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Quote:
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Thanks all for the suggestions. The piece came loose this am with lots of pounding while using the hydraulic ram. I am guessing that the overnight soak in WD-40 helped some.

Nicely, the stuffing box on the other rudder came off with very little effort.

Gordon
Given this discussion, the next time I change the rudder stuffing on our 440 I plan to thread a stainless nut down to the bottom of each stud, then a thin stainless washer, then the flanged top half of the stuffing box...and then the compression nuts. Built in screw jacks. Plenty of adjustment range on the studs to do this. Add a ring of stuffing material if I need more. Same for the prop stuffing boxes as access is very restricted.
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:49 PM   #36
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Or...

You could just service it more regularly so it doesnt get the chance to corrode together.
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:07 PM   #37
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Semi planning had best advice. How often to service, as suggested by some is a non starter. The other rudder seal came off by hand. I too think a nut at the bottom of the stud is the best way.

Mgdavis, i have no idea what you said.
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Old 05-15-2016, 10:01 AM   #38
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Sorry, I posted that before reading the second page of the thread. Another poster had expressed a concern about damaging the studs. Jamming two nuts together on a stud creates a place to use a wrench so that you can remove the stud without damaging the threads. Completely irrelevant to you now, since you already succeed in disassembling the component.
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