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Old 10-18-2019, 02:45 AM   #21
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Two coats if not 3 here. No idea of Chesapeake conditions, but 2 coats is minimum imo.
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Old 10-18-2019, 02:55 AM   #22
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Maybe a tad harsh. It`s been diver scrubbed approx. 28 times since application, as well as being in the water and getting used. If it`s ablative,I doubt it should be much better than it appears.
Could be on this case, but from what I've seen too often, this may be the exception. Cleaning once a month should never involve scrubbing. Now, running it a lot in that time, it could just be beyond it's life. Still, looks exceptionally bad.

Ablative in his location is also a choice of debate.
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Old 10-18-2019, 06:48 AM   #23
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well the paint is gone, if it was ablative that's the reason, if the diver used a scrubbing pad that was too course that an issue.


Did the diver tell you months ago he sees spots with no paint?


If so you should have pulled it then.



I suggest not using black it's hard for the diver to see things.


For a few years ago I used vivid white at that time I did my own bottom every week or two due to racing the visibility was great can't miss anything. But that was ablative, 6 months paint gone. But in NY that was about the whole season.

My current boat in FL was black when I bought it, now a light blue hard bottom paint.

THe barrier coat usually will remain in tact just bottom paint will wear away


sand it down, call the paint manufacturers ask their opinion for your area, paint two coats three on the water line.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:29 PM   #24
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Jamestown Distributors runs a bottom paint survey every year and publishes an interactive map to help you choose a good paint for your specific location.

https://www.jamestowndistributors.co...o?surveyId=101
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Old 10-25-2019, 03:21 PM   #25
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I tried Total Boat Spartan bottom paint on my stern thruster for a test to see how it worked. Put it on exactly per directions and applied 2 coats. We store the boat in a barn for 6 months out of the year. After 2 seasons which is equal to 1 year the paint was completely gone. Very disappointing. I will be using Micron when I paint the whole bottom next time.
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Old 10-25-2019, 05:07 PM   #26
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Bottom Pait Question

You might consider a Hydrohoist or other device that keeps the boat out of the water when not being used. We had one for our SeaRay, I think it paid for itself within a couple of years....
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Old 10-26-2019, 08:12 AM   #27
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We use Trinidad XL, advertised as being good for 5 years. Our trawler had been in the water for 3 years since last haul out, diver goes down once every two months, says it looks like new. Last time we hauled out after three years bottom paint was in good condition. It's a little pricey, runs between $280 and $300/gal but saves frequent haul out fees.
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Old 10-26-2019, 11:08 AM   #28
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Two coats, maybe three? Yes but why? Are those who apply multiple coats leaving their boat in the water all year? Having their bottoms professionally cleaned? Are they concerned with paint build up over the years? Are they using the right paint to begin with?

If users are applying ablative paint with more than a single coat I believe they are circumventing the main feature of ablative paint which is design to wear away. Maybe they should consider using a hard bottom paint instead. I avoid putting more paint on our boat than required to get through a single 5-6 month season. Paint buildup becomes a BPITA after years of over painting.

I was pleased with our boatís bottom condition when it was hauled last week. Last spring I applied a single coat of West Marineís Hydrocoat ablative paint. Starboard bottom side still has plenty of paint left and I will not put more on it for next season while the port side is substantially worn off. That side will be repainted prior to spring launch. My paint worn side is a good example of ablative doing what it is designed to do!
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Old 10-26-2019, 11:14 AM   #29
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With ablative paint you can put more than one coat without any problems. If you put more coats it will just mean that you can go longer between painting. Ablative paint will just wear away with time. It shouldnít build up thickness if you arenít painting too often. If you paint the first coat a different color and then subsequent coats the final color, when the first color starts to show through it is time to repaint.
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Old 10-26-2019, 11:54 AM   #30
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I'm going to clarify a number of erroneous assumptions being put forth in this thread:

1.- Regardless of how frequently your diver cleans your boat bottom, the media he uses to do it is 100% predicated upon the fouling he finds when he gets there. A statement like, "If you have your boat dived monthly, the diver should never use a scrub pad" is patently ridiculous. If your paint has outlived its useful lifespan and is fouling badly , that fouling may very well require an abrasive pad to remove it, regardless of paint type or cleaning frequency.

2.- All anti fouling paint manufacturers (and this hull diver) recommend a minimum of two coats of paint with three at the high wear areas like the waterline and leading/trailing edges of appendages. Boatyards are notorious for recommending just one coat because they know that with less biocide on the hull, the sooner you will need to haul for new paint.

3.- Anti fouling paints work (ablatives included) at least in part by leaching their biocide into the water very near the boat hull. For this to happen, water must penetrate the paint's surface. Yes, it is possible to apply so much paint that the water cannot penetrate the paint matrix deeply enough to free all of the biocide and in this case, the additional paint is useless. But two or three coats of any anti fouling paint are not enough to cause this. And again, when you apply a single coat as opposed to two or three, you have reduced the total amount of biocide available to retard fouling growth on your hull. And since the biocide is released continuously and at a predetermined rate, less paint means the available biocide is depleted earlier, necessitating more frequent haulouts.
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Old 10-26-2019, 12:17 PM   #31
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I'm going to clarify a number of erroneous assumptions being put forth in this thread:

1.- Regardless of how frequently your diver cleans your boat bottom, the media he uses to do it is 100% predicated upon the fouling he finds when he gets there. A statement like, "If you have your boat dived monthly, the diver should never use a scrub pad" is patently ridiculous. If your paint has outlived its useful lifespan and is fouling badly , that fouling may very well require an abrasive pad to remove it, regardless of paint type or cleaning frequency.

.
I'll repeat, your diver should never scrape. You should not let your paint outlive it's useful lifespan and reach the stage of fouling badly. That is patently ridiculous. If you clean the bottom often enough and repaint often enough then scraping will not be required. To base your objection on fouling after the paint is gone is no different than arguing on a bottom that has no bottom paint. It doesn't reflect best practices. We've never had scraping on any of our bottoms and we currently either own or are managing 7 boats.
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Old 10-26-2019, 12:24 PM   #32
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I'll repeat, your diver should never scrape. You should not let your paint outlive it's useful lifespan and reach the stage of fouling badly. That is patently ridiculous. If you clean the bottom often enough and repaint often enough then scraping will not be required. To base your objection on fouling after the paint is gone is no different than arguing on a bottom that has no bottom paint. It doesn't reflect best practices. We've never had scraping on any of our bottoms and we currently either own or are managing 7 boats.
You completely missed the point. I didn't say "cleaning after the paint is gone." I said after the paint has expended its biocide. If you think that every boat owner hauls for paint as soon as his diver indicates the boat needs it, you are sadly mistaken. And it's a misconception to think that a hull cleaner uses whatever he wants to clean your boat bottom. He uses what is necessary to remove the fouling growth that you have allowed to accumulate there.

BTW- I am in daily contact with many Florida hull divers and what they tell me is that scraping (which they call "blading") is SOP for hull cleaning there. But maybe yours is special.
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Old 10-26-2019, 02:59 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by fstbttms View Post
I'm going to clarify a number of erroneous assumptions being put forth in this thread:

1.- Regardless of how frequently your diver cleans your boat bottom, the media he uses to do it is 100% predicated upon the fouling he finds when he gets there. A statement like, "If you have your boat dived monthly, the diver should never use a scrub pad" is patently ridiculous. If your paint has outlived its useful lifespan and is fouling badly , that fouling may very well require an abrasive pad to remove it, regardless of paint type or cleaning frequency.

2.- All anti fouling paint manufacturers (and this hull diver) recommend a minimum of two coats of paint with three at the high wear areas like the waterline and leading/trailing edges of appendages. Boatyards are notorious for recommending just one coat because they know that with less biocide on the hull, the sooner you will need to haul for new paint.

3.- Anti fouling paints work (ablatives included) at least in part by leaching their biocide into the water very near the boat hull. For this to happen, water must penetrate the paint's surface. Yes, it is possible to apply so much paint that the water cannot penetrate the paint matrix deeply enough to free all of the biocide and in this case, the additional paint is useless. But two or three coats of any anti fouling paint are not enough to cause this. And again, when you apply a single coat as opposed to two or three, you have reduced the total amount of biocide available to retard fouling growth on your hull. And since the biocide is released continuously and at a predetermined rate, less paint means the available biocide is depleted earlier, necessitating more frequent haulouts.

Gees! Now I wonder why ''all anti fouling paint manufacturers recommend a minimum of two coats of paint.........."

If my business was manufacturing anti fouling paint.....or was a dealer selling the stuff, why heck, I would HIGHLY recommend a minimum of FOUR or even FIVE coats.

The amount of paint IMHO should be determined by how long the boat being painted is in the water along with what water area the boat is used. And I guess the planned number of bottom cleaning events expected could also be a consideration.

Just adding layer upon layer of paint for seasonal use here in Massachusetts' waters is not only money wasted, it will also result in heavy thicknesses of old paint that could require bottom stripping. Around here bottom stripping costs big bucks.
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Old 10-26-2019, 03:15 PM   #34
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Well, you make a valid point but the fact is that the great majority of boats in this country that use anti fouling paint do not have short sailing seasons. And it is also a fact that boats that do live in the water 24/7/365 typically get good performance from their anti fouling paint for about twice as long with two coats as opposed to one coat.
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Old 10-26-2019, 04:22 PM   #35
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I have a bit of experience in the bottom painting and ablative use business too.


Besdes an assistance towboat fleet it includes responsibility for USCG boats when the Commandant was real anti- toxicity and wanted to explore "options" other than chemical antifouling.


I have been using ablative/self polishing/etc paints since the 1980's on my own personal boats.


My recommendation on how many coats to use is based on your usage of the ablative paint.


Some years for me...1 coat except for high wear areas is all that came off......so the next haul, 1 coat went on...other years it seemed that more came off so 2 coats went on. I have never seen a need for 3 coats even on assistance towboats that run and run and run.



Also none of my boats or the assistance towboats or the USCG boats ever saw a diver. I understand their need for most recreational boaters, so factor that into your operation too.
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Old 10-26-2019, 04:27 PM   #36
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So, here's another question. When the ablative paint has become thin, opinions please on whether to apply one coat or two coats of paint. We boat on the east coast, primarily on the Chesapeake.
Two, of different colors so you can see when it is time to recoat.
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Old 10-26-2019, 05:54 PM   #37
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I guess most of us use ablatives, but also most of us travel slowly at trawler speed. Since this is a (fast) planing boat, is there a case to be made for a hard (non ablative) bottom paint??
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Old 10-26-2019, 10:37 PM   #38
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I guess most of us use ablatives, but also most of us travel slowly at trawler speed. Since this is a (fast) planing boat, is there a case to be made for a hard (non ablative) bottom paint??

Depends on how fast he cruises. And some ablatives ablate faster than others. I haven't had issues with excessively fast wear with Micron CSC or Micron Extra on my boat that cruises at 17 - 18 kts. Stuff targeted at keeping sailboats clean will ablate more easily, I'd think, so may not be a good choice on a faster boat.
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Old 10-26-2019, 10:41 PM   #39
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You completely missed the point. I didn't say "cleaning after the paint is gone." I said after the paint has expended its biocide. If you think that every boat owner hauls for paint as soon as his diver indicates the boat needs it, you are sadly mistaken. And it's a misconception to think that a hull cleaner uses whatever he wants to clean your boat bottom. He uses what is necessary to remove the fouling growth that you have allowed to accumulate there.

BTW- I am in daily contact with many Florida hull divers and what they tell me is that scraping (which they call "blading") is SOP for hull cleaning there. But maybe yours is special.
No, I don't think everyone does haul when the bottom paint is shot. I just think they should, and, if they did, there would be no cause for scraping. We do not allow scraping ever. I have a good friend who manages 10 boats and he doesn't allow scraping ever. We both use bottom cleaners who fully understand.

Yes, scraping is standard for all those who don't get cleaning frequently enough and don't haul with the bottom paint is shot. I didn't miss your point. I used the word "should".
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:17 PM   #40
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Okay, since I started this thread, let me add some more info. Just heard from the Marina, it does need bottom recoat. $2600, including outdrive. Sounds reasonable - about $100/ft of painted surface, includnig the outdrive. I will send pictures when all done. Some thoughts, please: On this 28ft Sea Ray SLX 280, I rarely go over 20mph, although it can go quite a bit faster - is this fast enough to knock of barnacles that have attached? I am not talking slime, these things are attached. I think my problem is that I don't use it enough and it sits at times for 3 weeks, sometimes a month, before i can get back to her and run her out for a while.
Question for FSTBTTMS or Divers on TF: What should I tell my diver to use on the bottom in terms of scrubbing? Or am I just toast because the waters on Hilton Head are so warm the growth will come and attach unless I run it often?
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