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Old 04-16-2012, 08:59 PM   #21
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If you want a seaworthy boat you wo'nt have any of that truck on the stern. And if you want to extend the boat buck up and extend the whole hull. Get a longer WLL too.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:35 AM   #22
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That is without a doubt the most butt-ugly thing I've ever seen on a boat and I've seen a lot of butt-ugly stuff on boats.

There is a marine company in Bellingham that obtained the molds for a long-out-of production cruiser of about 45 or 50 feet and created a hull extension that allows an eight foot or so wide swim step--- swim platform really--- on top of it. This setup makes some sense but it is not a "porch" stuck on the back end of the boat. The hull itself is extended back some eight feet or so and the extension is integral to the hull structure itself. And the huge platform aft of the normal cockpit bulkhead is extremely functional---- most of the one's I've seen store a big RIB there.

But that's a whole different ball game compared to the "porch" in the photos. Regardless of the function or strength or potential problem in any sort of a sea, the design itself is attrocious in my opinion. The owner has taken what was an ugly boat to start with and made it laughable. It looks like something you'd see up on blocks in a trailer park. The only thing it needs to complete the picture are some pink plastic flamigos duct-taped to the raiing. Be fascinating to find out how this guy acquired his sense of aesthetics--- probably make a good PhD dissertation for a budding psychologist.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:29 AM   #23
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I've seen a couple of these Menorquins on the East Coast. Nice boats, except for the strange looking back porch.
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:29 AM   #24
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[QUOTE=Marin;83217]That is without a doubt the most butt-ugly thing I've ever seen on a boat and I've seen a lot of butt-ugly stuff on boats.

Thanks Marin- I was beginning to think no one would tell it like it is on this one. They might as well add a tree fort on the top as a flybridge enclosure.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:15 AM   #25
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I've seen a couple of these Menorquins on the East Coast. Nice boats, except for the strange looking back porch.
IMHO - - >
That boat could too easily swamp and kill you in a tall, steep, close duration following sea resulting from high winds and strong opposing current of an inlet or other location.

Looks like the builders tried to copy the look of large "porches/landings" placed on mega yachts' sterns. Even the mega yachts could experience trouble in nasty enough open seas with those new-world stern platforms. On small boats I feel they are nuts... unless the boat owner is sure to NEVER get caught in bad enough seas. However, that word never, can never be fully counted upon! LOL
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:49 PM   #26
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Re the Menorquins..........................

I would NEVER buy such a boat.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:13 PM   #27
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Re the Menorquins..........................

I would NEVER buy such a boat.
Now, Eric... That word NEVER is just too big to EVER fully discount. If someone freely offered you a few hundred grand $$$, but the one stipulation was - you must purchase a Menorquins with the cash... the word NEVER, in this instance, would go right out your window! Then you could sell that boat and be FOREVER grateful for the $$$$! My, what BIG words we throw around!! LOL
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:18 PM   #28
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Are the large open areas filled with glass or lexan?

Can't tell by the pictures.

Is that a for sale sign on the upper deck.

Inquiring minds.

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Old 04-17-2012, 01:45 PM   #29
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Whlle I don't think hull extensions like the one on the Menorquin are particularly aesthetic I think if they're done right they don't have to affect seaworthiness. If the platform extension is indeed an integral part of the hull mold and is laid up accordingly or is spliced to an existing hull in such a manner that it becomes integral with the hull, I don't see it compromising the strength of the boat at all. Boarding seas will run right off and as long as the deck and hull are built to withstand the weight, what's the problem?

Fishing boats and tugs encounter situations where their decks are awash or inundated with water all the time with no problems assuming the boat's designed for these conditions. Ocean-going yachts encounter these conditions and the skipper of one once told me that the big aft platform behind the "garage doors" posed no issues at all even with following seas swamping them every now and then. If a boat like the Menorquin is properly designed and constructed--- and I have no idea if it is--- it is nothing but a scaled-down version of these larger boats so I wouldn't figure it would do any worse.

From the look of the boat overall it appears to be a coastal cruiser, not an open ocean boat anyway, much the same way a Grand Banks is a coastal cruiser, not an open ocean boat except under ideal conditions. So my guess is that, like the hull extensions installed by the Bellingham company I mentioned earlier, the Menorquin probably does just fine assuming good design and construction.

I don't care for the look of these platforms behind the transom but from the few boats I've seen with them they are certainly functional and add a lot of usability to the boat. Doesn't seem much different to me than the so-called "sea (or C) drives" used on some smaller sportfishing boats like SeaSport and the like, where a large motor well is attached or molded to the hull aft of a full-height transom. Gets the outboard(s) outside the cockpit altogether so there is no intrusion into the fishing space. Waves swamp in and the water runs out. No problem.

Here's the other side of the extension equation. A configuration of lobsterboat that is apparently growing more popular in Maine (didn't see any on Prince Edward Island) does away with the transom altogether. This in theory makes it easier to launch and recover strings of pots, although I had a couple of commercial lobster fishermen in Maine tell me the other year that the cutaway transom has resulted in more back injuries because of the way the pots are handled now. Regardless, following seas simply climb up into the boat and run back out again. And these guys go out when they have to go out as opposed to the typical yellow-stripe recreational powerboater who tends to tighten up the docklines when the wind starts climbing over 20 knots. If this boarding sea business compromised the integrity of the boat, I suspect the lobstermen wouldn't be using this configuration.
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:13 PM   #30
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Whlle I don't think hull extensions like the one on the Menorquin are particularly aesthetic I think if they're done right they don't have to affect seaworthiness. If the platform extension is indeed an integral part of the hull mold and is laid up accordingly or is spliced to an existing hull in such a manner that it becomes integral with the hull, I don't see it compromising the strength of the boat at all. Boarding seas will run right off and as long as the deck and hull are built to withstand the weight, what's the problem?
Marin

The problem is physics of weight - vs – general boat stability and steerage direction during times of very aggressive following seas. It's not that the back flat area won't drain, it is that as the cresting following wave slaps its tons of weight upon that area it will tend to shift the direction of the boat so forcefully that a dangerous breach could easily occur. Turbulent/confused following seas do not all hit the rear of boat in parallel with its direction, rather they often hit at all sorts of angles as compared to the direction a boat may need to hold. Sometimes a boat may need to hold a slightly angled direction compared to general direction of the following sea, in that case if the sea was aggressive the flat platform could be disastrous for keeping the boat stable. Transoms in general, with no flat platform, tend to shun the following sea’s direction changing thrust. That is why double enders are so great in accepting the following sea and easy to handle in following seas. Eric’s double ender would be a joy compared to most boats in a following sea.

These platforms will probably not be a problem – unless you get caught in a BIG and aggressive following sea. That’s the point I’m making.
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:38 PM   #31
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Art--- Good points about the dynamics of following seas against an extended platform boat, thanks. I can see where they could cause some real handling problems depending on the configuration of the boat. If the hull was deep or had a very deep keel or had a big rudder or if the boat was quite long, etc. I could see where the handling might not be affected too radically. But from the photo it would appear the Menorquin has none of these attributes so would probably suffer from the problems you describe.

I know our boat in a following sea (well, waves, really, we don't get "seas" in the inside waters up here) can keep one busy at the helm and we have a relatively narrow, open-slat swimstep. So we're just experiencing the force of the water against the flat transom.

I think Carey has the ultimate solution with his lobsterboat. If the following seas get annoying, he just speeds up. Can't do that with a pair of FL120s and a 30,000 pound boat.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:19 PM   #32
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Marin - Thanks for seeing my point. In decades past on the Atlantic coast I have experienced some real tough following seas and they can get scary.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:48 PM   #33
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I can't deny that the same issue with a large following see has occurred to me when considering adding a swim platform. Truth is, I have no "intention" to put myself in that kind of danger, but when crossing the Gulf Stream, who knows. Local squalls can give you 20 to 30 minutes of real hell. Our boat access and safety would be greatly enhanced by a swim platform, but one of the best assets of a Krogen Manatee is handling in a following sea. I'd hate to mess up a good thing, especially when it decides to kick-up while entering an inlet. The fold-up unit on the Coot really makes me think. It may be the best way to go.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:53 PM   #34
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as long as the "platform" like on the Menorquins (I believe) or the open deck of the lobster boats has buoyancy....you guys are worried WAYYYY too much.

work around offshore boats and barges and work platforms...they have all sorts of wierd looking projections that "look" unseaworthy...but as long as there's enough bouyancy and strength...no biggie.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:56 PM   #35
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....and for the record...double enders with lots of buoyancy back there ride like crap too.

They are safer to a point in breaking seas from abaft but if just large seas that lift the stern...they ride very similar to any other boat with the same underwater configuration.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:30 PM   #36
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Are the large open areas filled with glass or lexan?

Can't tell by the pictures.

Is that a for sale sign on the upper deck.

Inquiring minds.

Sd
See my earlier post referring to the boat`s advertisment for sale.
Lexan or glass? Glass
For Sale Sign? Yes.
As to the admiring quote attributed to the Coast Guard operator,I wonder what his guide dog thought about the design. BruceK
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:50 PM   #37
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nicely done maybe, but butt ugly and does nothing for the boat or resale.
Man if he wanted a bigger boat he should have purchased a bigger boat.
But then again each to his own.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:51 PM   #38
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nicely done maybe, but butt ugly and does nothing for the boat or resale.
Man if he wanted a bigger boat he should have purchased a bigger boat.
But then again each to his own.
Had that 3 foot'itis but only the 6 inch budget...
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:18 PM   #39
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You ought to have heard how the fertile girl boats in the marina chatted as gossip when his supposed 3' seemed like 6" to them!
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:25 PM   #40
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This fellow cut his boat and added 4' in the middle. The design lines shows the extension addition. It is a glass over wood boat and was originally local built. He added the cabin / flybridge after he extended it.

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