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Old 07-07-2019, 06:19 PM   #21
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There are many so-called experts, many theories, and many many opinions.
But nobody seems to have any actual knowledge of a boat sinking as a result of blisters.

A 1967 boat still floating is most likely sound.

+1
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:58 PM   #22
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No but more than a few have been deemed unseaworthy by the USCG and even more have been uninsurable. Read and investigate enough ....and you find more than the typical posts of " I've never heard of a sinking"



I have pictures (previous post) personal experience with the nightmare.


Most people have anecdotal experience and no skin in the game.


I will leave the readers with that.
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:59 PM   #23
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Thanks to all for the thoughtful replies. I have indeed read many of the in depth articles on blisters, and there certainly is a lot to learn. In terms of photos, the old survey only had a couple of pictures of the bottom (I couldnít figure out how to clip them and post) and they donít show anything that looks too huge, but they are limited in scope. I believe the hull is of very heavy, solid laid up fiberglass (novcore) construction, based on the comments I have read about other Willards. There is one other boat like this in the PNW, named Neried, and if anyone knows how I could get in touch with the owner of that vessel I would greatly appreciate it, so I could compare notes about this issue.

I know that anything other than a simple grind and fill job requires a yard with considerable skill, and probably costs a lot. I am not sure how much bargaining room I will have with the Seller, and it might come down to a choice of walking or taking my chances. We shall see. The boat is clearly very nice in other respects and she has held up for 52 years without any evidence of structural issues, so I tend to think it is unlikely there is a significant problem. We shall see when I get my own survey. It is great to have this group,to bounce things off of. Thanks!
We had a boat that had hundreds of very small blisters that were in the gel coat - everyone we spoke to said they were harmless and to leave them alone.
After 7 seasons with the boat we decided to get them peeled and fixed while doing a bottom job even though we never had any problems. A yard up the Hudson river used a peeling machine and then if memory serves me well they put on 3 coats of west system epoxy followed by interprotect barrier coats and then 3 bottom paint coats. Our boat was 48' and the costs were about $10,000 for the hull work the year we did that.
After the work and for the next 6 seasons we never had a blister come back - so we likely 'solved' our cosmetic problem 100% with this technique.
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:57 PM   #24
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Yep, blisters are cosmetic til you talk to people who are experts in hydrolysis.


Blisters are often cosmetic, but not always and can be a much larger problem.


The vast majority of both boaters and boatyards know little about the problem.


Read the other thread concerning bottom issues, especially post 22 - link below


Http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...ook-45319.html
I have done osmosis repairs on a Willard (our yard was also a dealer for a while, for the few new 30s and 40s they made). Some of the blisters were grapefruit size, among the largest I've seen. It was impractical to peel deep enough to remove all affected laminate, so we peeled 5 layers and laminated with VE resin, albeit with no warranty. As far as I know that vessel never developed any new blisters.

I'm not suggesting you do this, or that you not buy the boat, but beware, there are blisters and there are blisters, it would be good to get someone who is knowledgeable to have a look and see just how large/deep they are before proceeding.

(Cruising in British Columbia aboard Venture)
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Old 07-12-2019, 05:15 PM   #25
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I'm sorry because this has nothing to do with the question at hand. Gorgeous vessel, but is that an electric horn atop the PH? That vessel rates a nice LOUD air horn.
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:26 PM   #26
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Thanks, Rich. Havenít tried the horn yet, but you may be right!
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:53 PM   #27
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I am posting this article from WestSystems on BLISTERS and Their REPAIR.
This is in hopes it will enlighten those who are interested.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Gelcoat-Blisters-Diagnosis-Repair-and-Prevention.pdf (2.37 MB, 27 views)
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Old 07-12-2019, 07:58 PM   #28
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Please buy it so I'll stop looking at it on yachtworld every day. That one has been on my radar since I saw it at Roche many years ago.
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Old 07-12-2019, 08:57 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by fgarriso View Post
I am posting this article from WestSystems on BLISTERS and Their REPAIR.
This is in hopes it will enlighten those who are interested.
I used this system to repair thousands of small blisters with some areas delaminated. It works but all the sanding, grinding, sanding, filling, sanding, sanding sanding is a very physical and time consuming job. Not a fun job at all.

But I now have 100% confidence in the hull. Majority of the blisters were cosmetic but there were a number of places I could see the matting.
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Old 07-13-2019, 01:05 PM   #30
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As noted in a related thread, I love West System epoxy, reliable and easy to mix. Its low VOC means it's friendly to applicators, no respirator required. The drawback when used for this type of work is the fairing part, it's very labor intensive.

Vinyl ester is far easier to fair, but you need a respirator when applying it. Most professionals use VE resin and fairing compound.

(Aboard Venture in Prince Rupert, BC)
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Old 07-13-2019, 02:21 PM   #31
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The amount of verbiage generated with blisters showing up on survey, and the vast divergence from reality in that verbiage makes blisters a red herring, with absolutely no solution to be had via the WWW. Comments ranging from "do nothing, it's cosmetic" to "the sky is falling" would lead me to listen carefully to the marine professionals in your area regarding this particular boat's situation. Then, act accordingly. Your money, your choice. And remember, if you're concerned now, the person you will sell this boat to in the future will be concerned as well.

Regards,

Pete
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Old 07-13-2019, 02:24 PM   #32
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The million dollar question is "who are" the marine professionals in an area?
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Old 07-13-2019, 02:42 PM   #33
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When I bought my boat I only looked at survey, not at a real estimate for repair from a good boatyard....never again....
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Old 07-14-2019, 07:59 AM   #34
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1000 blisters

I bought a Nimble Kodiak with at least 1000 small blisters. The boat was in the ocean year Year round for years in Southern waters. I brought it to Massachusetts on a trailer. Over the winter ALL THE BLISTERS DISAPPEARED. 😁. They never returned leaving it in the ocean 5 months per season
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Old 07-15-2019, 05:48 AM   #35
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"The million dollar question is "who are" the marine professionals in an area?"


Putting one block under a keel for winter storage?
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Old 07-15-2019, 06:08 AM   #36
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Most likely, but maybe not ...

Like cancer, by the time you notice the symptoms.........
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Old 08-13-2019, 04:29 PM   #37
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Have you pulled the trigger?
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:17 PM   #38
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Not yet. Survey and sea trial is this Friday. Was delayed because the current owner wanted to do one more cruise before selling. We shall see . . .
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:36 AM   #39
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JKnox - while fairly new to this TF group, I am not new to Willards. I own a 1970 W36, and am moderator of the Yahoo! Group Willard Boat Owners Group that has been around for 20+ years. As you can imagine, blisters have been extensively discussed over the years - perhaps 100's of posts with extensive research on mil-spec driven changes to resin formulations, etc. Feel free to come over and join. All Willards at the time were semi-custom, meaning they weren't built until there was an owner.

In very general terms, blisters come in two flavors: below waterline, and above waterline. In my observation, above waterline blisters are mostly associated with late 1970's early/mid 1980's, and associated with changes to resin - there are a number of Willards of this vintage with moderate above waterline blisters (versus severe case of pox that looks like an inverted golf ball - Uniflite). Below waterline blisters are very common - vast majority of Willards of all vintages have/had them, including mine (at least 100). I received a survey credit when I purchased her, I will pass that along to the next owner when she sells. Simple. I do not know of a Willard that has had any structural damage due to blisters.

These are relatively thick-hulled slow boats. The only downside to blisters I can tell is when you haul and Capt. Obvious comes up and say "Gee, your boat has blisters!"

Blisters are a non-issue for me as long as the valuation reflects a respectable credit so I can pass along during resale. I will go a step further and say that anyone who is very concerned about blisters should not buy a fiberglass boat let alone a Willard. Weebles, my W36, currently sits in Ensenada undergoing a full refit where I can have a full bottom job done for a very reasonable cost. I won't do it as there are better places to spend my money. But that's me.

Good luck with your sea trial.
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