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Old 04-04-2013, 11:25 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Phil Fill View Post
So does the fastener/screw still tighten/hold?
Yes, with the exception of one screw in the base that mounts to FRP. When I removed seven of the eight (four per side) one screw was half the length of the rest so had no purchase.
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Old 04-04-2013, 12:50 PM   #22
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Yes, with the exception of one screw in the base that mounts to FRP. When I removed seven of the eight (four per side) one screw was half the length of the rest so had no purchase.

Then you can use almost what ever you want. 4200 is recommended for metal/hardware/fasteners as it can come a part. Squirt some in the hole, on the screw threads, and under/around the ladder base if possible. Tighten and clean up caulking excess with Paint Thinner before calking dries. If the screws do not tighten then you should ream out the hole, bend nail is fine, fill with epoxy, and drill new hole.

I used 5200 for everything so I do not have a tube of this and that, that dries out. Boat Life calking is also a good brand. You can buy both in small tubes. Many time if I dont ever want to take apart I use Epoxy instead of caulking.

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Old 04-04-2013, 02:44 PM   #23
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We swear by butyl rubber tape, having used it to rebed every piece of deck hardware on our sailboat. The stuff will stay flexible for decades, allowing it to continue to seal even if the attachments flex. It does not have any adhesive qualities, but you don't need that if you have good mechanical fasteners. As an example, we had a stanchion bent 90 degrees during an altercation with another boat during a storm, and even then it didn't leak. Not all butyl is created equal. We bought some from the hardware store that we wound up throwing away. The best stuff I've found is the type RC (Mainesail) sells through his Compass Marine website (link in one of the above posts). Order two rolls - it won't go bad and shipping is the same. Also, this particular tape is light grey, not black like the stuff they sell at auto parts stores. Clean up is really easy - any that oozes out after tightening down the hardware can be picked up by using a small ball of the stuff, which the squeeze out will stick to. In sum, it is all we use now for all above waterline hardware where we don't need adhesive qualities (which is just about everything).
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Old 04-04-2013, 11:57 PM   #24
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.............I used 5200 for everything so I do not have a tube of this and that, that dries out. ...
The 5200 does not dry out (cure in the tube)?
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Old 04-05-2013, 12:07 AM   #25
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The 5200 does not dry out (cure in the tube)?

It will if there's air in the tube along with it. I've had somewhat good luck taping the fingertip of a latex glove over the open end of a tube of sealant and squeezing a ball of sealant up into the finger. This will dry out to a point but the main value is it keeps air from getting at the bulk of the sealant down in the tube. It's not a forever-cure, but it does seem to stretch out the longevity of an opened tube of sealant or adhesive quite a bit.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:30 AM   #26
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It will if there's air in the tube along with it. I've had somewhat good luck taping the fingertip of a latex glove over the open end of a tube of sealant and squeezing a ball of sealant up into the finger. This will dry out to a point but the main value is it keeps air from getting at the bulk of the sealant down in the tube. It's not a forever-cure, but it does seem to stretch out the longevity of an opened tube of sealant or adhesive quite a bit.
Yes. I had a post on the subject a while back. That and keeping the tube in the freezer seem to slow down the process but the thought of having a convenient tube of 5200 in the tool box for any project doesn't seem like it would work too well to me.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:41 PM   #27
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FYI - just came across this article discussing butyl (and other sealers) on the Ocean Navigator site. It even links to Mainsail (RC/Compass Marine)'s write up on the topic: http://www.oceannavigator.com/Web-Exclusives-2013/Fighting-topside-leaks/
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