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Old 09-08-2014, 09:32 AM   #1
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Ballast

Where would one find the proper rules for mounting Lead Ballast below with in a F.G. vessel.??
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:55 AM   #2
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Lead shot inside doubled truck tire inner tubes cut into 14" pieces, then cable tie the ends. Each one ends up weighing 40# or so, and they can be nestled into odd shaped spaces.
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:40 AM   #3
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Lead shot inside doubled truck tire inner tubes cut into 14" pieces, then cable tie the ends. Each one ends up weighing 40# or so, and they can be nestled into odd shaped spaces.
And, if new lead shot is too spendy, you can go to your local scrap metal yard and buy lead pigs, or you can scrounge the lead from plumbers, tire shops (wheel weights), indoor firing ranges, battery recyclers, and so on... your creativity is the limit. Y ou can easily melt it and pour it into a wooden box form or a coffee can. Put those in your bilge as they are clean, odor free, dry, and very easy to carry and stow. If you are really obsessed, you can make molds that fit between your frames just so, and each pig will fit perfectly.

Lead shot in inner tubes (I love that idea, Delfin) or lead pigs are also easy to adjust, and easy to remove when you want to clean or paint the bilges.

In a Grand Banks, knock-downs, broaching and pitch-poling are remote possibilities, so attaching the ballast, or pouring it in place are probably not going to be required.

A final thought, perhaps the design team at Grand Banks or the Grand Banks Owners Forum could provide more specific information.
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:01 AM   #4
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And, if new lead shot is too spendy, you can go to your local scrap metal yard and buy lead pigs, or you can scrounge the lead from plumbers, tire shops (wheel weights), indoor firing ranges, battery recyclers, and so on... your creativity is the limit. Y ou can easily melt it and pour it into a wooden box form or a coffee can. Put those in your bilge as they are clean, odor free, dry, and very easy to carry and stow. If you are really obsessed, you can make molds that fit between your frames just so, and each pig will fit perfectly.

Lead shot in inner tubes (I love that idea, Delfin) or lead pigs are also easy to adjust, and easy to remove when you want to clean or paint the bilges.

In a Grand Banks, knock-downs, broaching and pitch-poling are remote possibilities, so attaching the ballast, or pouring it in place are probably not going to be required.

A final thought, perhaps the design team at Grand Banks or the Grand Banks Owners Forum could provide more specific information.
It wasn't my idea, but is sure works great. We used robust cable ties, one put on first to close the ends, then doubled the tail over and attached a second one to reduce the length and double seal it. What is nice is that they conform to pretty much whatever shape you have to work with. I stuffed around 1,000# under the generator stand, feeding them through the small opening available.

As you say, it is always a good idea to visualize your boat rolling through 360 degrees to imagine what shifts or goes flying when it happens.
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:09 AM   #5
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As you say, it is always a good idea to visualize your boat rolling through 360 degrees to imagine what shifts or goes flying when it happens.
!! Yea, great thought . . . . how many of us have checked our battery boxes and other heavy objects lately? Sorry, thread creep.
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:14 AM   #6
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Or picture the Ekones chairs in a Nordhavn flying through the windows when a major roll occurs, say 69 degrees in an Australia bar crossing locale.
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Old 09-08-2014, 12:30 PM   #7
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Or picture the Ekones chairs in a Nordhavn flying through the windows when a major roll occurs, say 69 degrees in an Australia bar crossing locale.
Blasphemy, You must be mistaken Nordhaven would never place loose furniture in a passagmaker....would they??
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Old 09-08-2014, 12:55 PM   #8
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Got a question on ballast. Adding ballast means the boat will sit lower in the water, ergo, more wetted area, meaning a higher fuel burn. Am I correct?
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Old 09-08-2014, 01:31 PM   #9
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Personally I wouldn't be adding any ballast without consulting a naval architect, better yet the one who designed the boat. And yes, ancora, that would be correct, there's always some compromise involved.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:07 PM   #10
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Personally I wouldn't be adding any ballast without consulting a naval architect, better yet the one who designed the boat. And yes, ancora, that would be correct, there's always some compromise involved.
Agreed. I wouldn't be second guessing the designer and/or manufacturer.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:19 PM   #11
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Personally I wouldn't be adding any ballast without consulting a naval architect, better yet the one who designed the boat. And yes, ancora, that would be correct, there's always some compromise involved.
If the vessel is made to sit on her design waterline with the addition and the ballast is added below that waterline, any naval architect I can think of would likely say "why not?" wouldn't they? How does lowering the center of gravity present a problem? I asking, not arguing, by the way.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:31 PM   #12
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RonT,

I guess it might be in order to ask why you feel the need to add ballast? Are you trying to correct the trim, or maybe compensate for something that will be added or removed?

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Old 09-08-2014, 03:37 PM   #13
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Didn't the Alaskan crab boat, Altair, sink in 1983 because somebody inadvertantly raised the bootstripe? The boat apperantly got loaded to its usual level (as indicated by the waterline) and sank because of instability issues.

That story would make me want to confirm that previous owners hadn't raised the bootstripe before adding significant ballast.
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Old 09-08-2014, 04:21 PM   #14
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Didn't the Alaskan crab boat, Altair, sink in 1983 because somebody inadvertantly raised the bootstripe? The boat apperantly got loaded to its usual level (as indicated by the waterline) and sank because of instability issues.

That story would make me want to confirm that previous owners hadn't raised the bootstripe before adding significant ballast.
Probably not much of an issue with a Grand Banks. Quite a few of them around. The Altair sank because crab pots were loaded on until the vessel was at an erroneously painted higher water line. This was not adding ballast as the OP suggests he is doing but adding significant weight above the center of gravity. Apples and oranges. Even if the waterline were too high on this vessel, adding weight in the bilges is only going to increase, not decrease stability. It may slow the vessel down, but it won't make it less stable.
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Old 09-08-2014, 04:54 PM   #15
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Probably not much of an issue with a Grand Banks. Quite a few of them around. .......
So the question must be - Why would someone think they needed to add ballast to a boat when hundreds of the same design have been running around for many years without the need of additional ballast?
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Old 09-08-2014, 05:34 PM   #16
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for the same reason people add stabilization to boats that are never sold with them...

the final manufactured product of almost anything is NEVER perfect.....
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Old 09-08-2014, 05:43 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
If the vessel is made to sit on her design waterline with the addition and the ballast is added below that waterline, any naval architect I can think of would likely say "why not?" wouldn't they? How does lowering the center of gravity present a problem? I asking, not arguing, by the way.
I'm not an NA, so I don't know. Lead costing what it does, and the hassle of installing it, why not spend a little and get an educated opinion?
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Old 09-08-2014, 06:25 PM   #18
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for the same reason people add stabilization to boats that are never sold with them.....
And that would be?
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Old 09-08-2014, 07:10 PM   #19
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Stabilizers.....pretty clear I think....
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Old 09-19-2014, 08:38 AM   #20
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I am thinking of adding some ballast to my port quarter- stern. Reason being is 300' of chain in the forward locker and the slight tendency to sit starboard a little. I think the starboard slight list is because the aft head, the galley, and the lower helm are all on starboard side. I have had two people stand on the port side of the swim platform and it sits completely level so maybe 450 lbs or so would do it. Not trying to change the original dynamics, just offsetting added on items that threw it slightly off. I am still way good on waterline, stability, etc.

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