Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-14-2015, 10:36 AM   #21
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"instead of a simple terminal block for the DC connection...sure enough the factory installed an outlet and regular old 110 plug.nicely labeled though."

A house plug and sockets are great for DC as they wipe and clean when the plug goes in.

With most boats having no 240v items , the use of a 15A or 20A plug an socket built in the 240V style is a great way to power DC items of less than 20A.

These are cheap (in boat terms) and work well as DC supplys as the ground pin (not hooked up ) works to self polarize the circuit.

About 3X the current caring ability of a std cigar lighter socket and plug.

A boat with a genuine 240v socket and plug need can simply use a std 240V with a 30A plug and socket so there is no confusion.
All true enough...knew the 240 plug trick from my days at the marine electronics firm I worked for...had their test bench wired up that way 110/12V right next to each other buy different socket/plugs.

I have a few of the 240 sockets wired for 12V too as I detest cigarette light lighter receptacle/plug combos.

But in the case of the refrigerator...for a dedicated circuit that is buried well...why add a plug and socket when either butt connectors or a terminal strip would have been fine. Access under the forward vee berth to the terminal strip would have been fine. Guess the builder had their reasons...just better if not a standard socket.
__________________
Advertisement

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 10:44 AM   #22
Av8
Veteran Member
 
City: Beaumont, TX
Country: US
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Assuming the the correct setup was used...as we know...you never know for sure what some will do on bosts.

I finally looked behind my fridge this week ...instead of a simple terminal block for the DC connection...sure enough the factory installed an outlet and regular old 110 plug.nicely labeled though..fortunately the label glue is better than the construction methods.

Having read that some people have had their DC systems with black and white wiring (like the old Furuno power cords)....I wonder what color code is used in the OPS boat and still wondering if the boat is wired for a 50A 125 /250 or 2 30A cords and how the out of phase leg is in the outlet line and not the whole boat.
My boat is wired 50a 125/250.

Phil
__________________

Av8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 11:07 AM   #23
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8 View Post
My boat is wired 50a 125/250.

Phil
Not sure at this point...but I would check the neutral to the ground and see if I was getting 110...If so...as really what I think some have said...you might have one of the incoming hot legs somehow getting power to the neutral.

It should be the "other" leg from the one supplying the hot to that GFI.

If not obvious and you don't have the time but have the money...a pro may be able to track down the fault with specialized tools easier than I could.

If you like the work or just plain want to do it yourself...that's one direction.

Cant think of any other reason...but there are several ways /places the fault could be happening.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 12:45 PM   #24
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Somewhere
Country: , Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,874
How about a GOOD photo of the receptacle. Maybe as already suggested it IS a 240v unit for some now unknown purpose.
You state the boat has 240 aboard so it may have been intentional.
A GOOD photo will tell.
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 03:33 PM   #25
Av8
Veteran Member
 
City: Beaumont, TX
Country: US
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 41
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

Voltages measured in multiple combinations, I removed the receptacle and wires, measured voltage at each leg, separated the line from the load wires, diagramed it all out on paper and put it all back together. I the crossed over to the starboard side of the boat to replace a bad switch. I measured the voltage and found 240v. I went to the shipyards closest receptacle and again, 240v. Meter gently discarded, it looked great flying across the yard into a pile of junk. Two things worked against me, a bad meter inherited from past owner, and the GFCI was wired incorrectly. All is well on Rogue. Many thanks to all who responded with advice. I now have a better understanding of my wiring, and a new volt ohm meter.

Phil
Av8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 03:42 PM   #26
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Good job....

The best advice I ever had and passed for troubleshooting is check the simple first and when it's not that...double check yourself, your equipment and your troubleshooting proceedures....because it IS usually something simple.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012