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Old 06-17-2014, 07:40 AM   #21
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Interesting, thanks.
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Old 06-17-2014, 07:50 AM   #22
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Question and I'm not trying to be funny here, but you seem to like the Tong oil and you're thinking about covering it up (the doors) with a polyurethane varnish? What happens when you chip, ding or wear thru the poly? Why not just use the Tong oil? That looks like it would be much easier to do maintenance coats. Just asking.
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Old 06-17-2014, 07:56 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
Question and I'm not trying to be funny here, but you seem to like the Tong oil and you're thinking about covering it up (the doors) with a polyurethane varnish? What happens when you chip, ding or wear thru the poly? Why not just use the Tong oil? That looks like it would be much easier to do maintenance coats. Just asking.
That's what I'm thinking...the main reason for me is I'm hard on a boat's finish.

I like the idea that I can wipe on another coat whenever, wherever I want...a little or a lot at a time and all I have to do is grab a bottle and rag.

No..."dang gotta strip a whole section and spend days making that section look as Yottie as the others"....

My idea of maintenance is something between nice pleasure and workboat...except for drivetrain/steering as getting south every year is paramount.
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:30 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
Question and I'm not trying to be funny here, but you seem to like the Tong oil and you're thinking about covering it up (the doors) with a polyurethane varnish? What happens when you chip, ding or wear thru the poly? Why not just use the Tong oil? That looks like it would be much easier to do maintenance coats. Just asking.
Larry I suspect he's not fully happy w the low "gloss" of the "Tong". I was ok w that re my Linseed oil in Alaska but down here we will probably go back to McCloskies spar varnish. The Gloss w Tong oil in it. I'd have Tong in every coat then unlike C & D who will run out of Tong when they switch to polly. It's basically Chris's call as she does most of the finish work and she wants varnish. Come to think of it I did the Linseed oil. But she's 3/4 of the way through w changing the black teak back to original light brown wood. I say sure lets do it.
We usually work on the boat together though and lately the ER stuff has been even less fun.
But if it were just me I'd prolly just do Tong if it worked for me like it seems to for C & D. Many of us over the years have tried some form of oil finish and we should make C & D heroes if the've got a really workable oil finish. I'm up to say'in cheers for C & D. But I'll keep some raw eggs handy .. Just kidd'in.
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:32 AM   #25
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Ya'll are making me reconsider the poly over coat as the whole reason for this exercise is for a low maintenance attractive finish. The tung oil does provide a hard finish with a low sheen but in the sun it almost sparkles. From what I studied that is the fat in the oil that cures into crystals. I am with Psneeld in that I like the idea of just being able to wipe some more on when the time calls for it.
I don't know if this is a long term solution but it is definitely better than any other oil I have tried. It is not sticky when cured and is completely water proof. Time will tell how long it lasts between having to recoat.
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:09 PM   #26
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I will want to know what happens if you overcoat AND if you don't.

Much rather you didn't though.
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Old 06-17-2014, 01:26 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Cathy and David View Post
Ya'll are making me reconsider the poly over coat as the whole reason for this exercise is for a low maintenance attractive finish. The tung oil does provide a hard finish with a low sheen but in the sun it almost sparkles. From what I studied that is the fat in the oil that cures into crystals. I am with Psneeld in that I like the idea of just being able to wipe some more on when the time calls for it.
I don't know if this is a long term solution but it is definitely better than any other oil I have tried. It is not sticky when cured and is completely water proof. Time will tell how long it lasts between having to recoat.
Keep on wiping and keep on cruising is my theory....working on boats never pays enough and falls way short of drinking beer or rum....

...which to me suggests one hand for the glass and one hand for the oily rag...and suits me just fine...
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Old 06-17-2014, 02:01 PM   #28
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Our last tug trawler had enough varnish to melt my heart. After 13 years in 200 annual inches of rain, keeping it up was a real challenge. In part the reason that we sold the tug and all the wood and purchased a "Plastic" boat. In doing so one of the main attributes sought was lack of wood! So, with the current boat and a very small amount of trim in wood, we chose (Drum Roll!!) BROWN PAINT, but of high quality. a water based polyurethane . Brush washes out with water, one coat last years, and a pint can will do!!! Ya hoo!!!!

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Old 06-17-2014, 02:14 PM   #29
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Al,

Just leave the brush on the float while you go have lunch at The Point.
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Old 06-17-2014, 02:15 PM   #30
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1 Coat of water based poly only lasted about 6 months in a combo of NJ to FL weather..thus my looking to Tung oil..stripping anything isn't worth my time.
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Old 06-19-2014, 11:24 PM   #31
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Cathy and David,
Found some Tung oil in the garage. "Hope's". Says 100% Tung oil. "contains pure 100% Tung oil. It's not "thinned". Contains no petroleum distillates."
It says when working w a large surface or high humidity it can be thinned as much as 50%. Interesting thing is that on the front of the can it says "for interior use". I wonder why they said that. Tung oil is Tung oil.
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Old 06-20-2014, 12:40 AM   #32
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Deks Olje has worked well for 4 years now. It looks good when fresh, gradually loses gloss, needs annual recoat, of 2 coats. Prep to recoat is minimal, no sanding, a rub down with a kitchen scrubber/sponge and water. The hassle is the wood prep to start, initial oil saturation day with #1 oil,followed by 4-5 coats of #2 gloss. After that it`s easy to restore and maintain.
It`s a compromise, not as good as varnish, but it never bubbles, flakes or needs heavy sanding.
The #2 gloss part is not essential, it can be left as an oil finish, I prefer gloss.
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Old 06-20-2014, 12:49 AM   #33
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Gentlemen, have a look at this site. I have used Le Tonk, Allbach linseed oil paint and the linseed oil soap, as well as one of their brushes. It all works as advertised, the varnish is great stuff, the paint is ideal for windows and the soap cleans the brushes. No solvents or nasty chemicals to ruin your brain and it even has a nice aroma. Read the site and then look for the US seller, he's online too.

Le Tonkinios Linseed Varnish
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Old 07-02-2014, 12:43 AM   #34
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Varnish

Here in NZ we have a very high UV content that does a lot of damage to brightwork. Oiling will also go black quite quickly here. There was a product developed here which is a single pack product. I have used this on the boarding platform teak trim - this goes underwater when we are underway so gets a hard life . So far the only failure is where the impacts from the dinghy break the film. Have since done some of the new caprails as well. It has been bought out by alwcraft - google: "waitemata woodies" enter the search "varnish" - there is a link showing what sort of results can be obtained, most of the classic boats on that website are all using this product. Application needs to be read and done carefully - but you can do multiple coats in one day. There are lot of boats here using this and are very happy with the long term results.
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:59 AM   #35
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I assume this is what you are referring to: Uroxsys Ltd: Marine Clearcoat Range

http://www.uroxsys.co.nz/pdfs/BoatingNZJuly2010.pdf
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Old 07-02-2014, 04:10 AM   #36
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Varnish

Yes that is what it is known as here - but Alwcraft have it now as Alwood. Some impressive results once you have it on. The price increased once it was sold to alwcraft however. Application is quite easy - sealer coat ( can be pigmented for teak or mahog) then the top coats. Can post some photos if you want - but the previous website has a lot of boats that have this system. My boarding platform has survived well - just a slight loss of gloss on the trim pieces after 2 years . My love of a hard dinghy however is the downfall - it takes a good whack at times that breaks the film - but boy that dinghy is nice to row. All the best Keith
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:12 AM   #37
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I suggest you walk the docks in the height of the summer, look at the boats with the nicest finishes and find out what they use. More than likely it will be a good quality varnish.
Varnish will give you the best appearance and the best protection for your woodwork other than a 2 component urethane when it comes to clear coating. Two-component urethanes should be sprayed on and that's why you don't ever see it except for factory finishes.
When it comes to wood protection and looks, there are no secrets. There are no easy finishes that are worthwhile. If there was, everyone would be doing it, including the manufacturers. When it comes to the hype about how great the old finishes were, all I can say is if the old ways were better we would still be doing it that way.
People will always justify not having to spend over $40 per quart and the time it takes to mask everything off.
A good looking and well protecting finish takes a lot of time if you have a poor surface to start with, which is usually you have when you buy an older boat. You scrub, you sand, you wash down and do it over and over again a few times. Then you patch old holes and finally you spend another day or two masking off and finally you are able to apply varnish at 6 to 8 coats. This process can take a week or longer the first time you do it. The good news is that if you maintain it every year the work becomes less and less.
All you have to do to maintain an existing good finish is to wash down and rinse real good, sand lightly, mask off and apply about another 4 coats of varnish. If the weather is right, you can do 2 coats per day. The masking time will be cut in half of what it took you the first time because you will have discovered faster ways to do it during the first time you did it.
Like I said, walk the docks and ask the owners what they used.
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Old 07-02-2014, 11:54 AM   #38
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It's a big assumption that...
1. everyone cares about "yachtie level" finishes
2. has the time to spend getting there.
3. has the money if not the time to get there
4. as has been stated...some are willing to redo after ever scratch, some are willing to avoid all scratches to the point of only working on their boat and not really using it, and others want a finish that protects with just a dab or two more of oil.
5. some old ways still give the same old protection...may not have the look that's wanted, but the protection is there without the danger of moisture under a breach.
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Old 07-02-2014, 12:10 PM   #39
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Scott,
Do you think a high quality oil based varnish has an inferior look to 2 part or other more modern finishes?
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Old 07-02-2014, 12:45 PM   #40
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I know very little about varnish because I don't ever use it ...due to the work involved.

I am not a fine woodworker and have much better things to do on a boat rather than brightwork...wish I could afford to pay for it because it does look nice and is a badge in some ways...but I have enough to do to save time for using the boat.

Plus the way I use boats...I'd ruin it in one cruise and the whole thing would need to be redone...

So I know very little about anything other than trying to keep something other than gray and keep it from weathering to fast.

As I told someone on the dock the other day....tung oil gets one shot at the title...if it's not going to work, I'll take the teak off and put on either plastic wood, or some other 20 year indestructible material or just make a glass gunnel cap.
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