Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-24-2014, 10:34 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
bshillam's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Our Heaven
Vessel Model: Willard 30' Searcher
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 471
81 Crusaders 350 cid 270 hp, timing help

I set my base timing as the manufacturer recommends at 10 degrees BTDC. However in the owners manual there is nothing about TA most of my reading says I should be all in at 3200 rpms and about 22 degrees, not to even worry about base timing - let that fall where it will after setting it at the higher RPM setting. First time I have adjusted timing and would like to do it properly. Thanks for the help.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Bringing the love of wood and water together, we create something you will treasure from the day you first row, sail, or power.
bshillam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 11:04 AM   #2
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,889
Set at 22deg at 3200 or above. That is what matters. Back to idle if advance is working, it should settle around 10deg.
__________________

Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 11:05 AM   #3
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,882
Well, let me go back a few decades to the olden days when ignition consisted of a coil and a distributer with points.

Almost all ignition systems advanced timing based on engine vacuum (via a diaphragm) and rpm (based on spring loaded weights like a governor).

So I believe that the proper procedure is to disconnect the vacuum hose and adjust the base timing at idle using a strobe light.

David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 11:56 AM   #4
OFB
Guru
 
OFB's Avatar
 
City: Richmond bc
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Invader no1
Vessel Model: Kishi Boat works
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 640
I have always set timing on marine gas engines using a vacuum gage. dockside under load.
Secure boat to dock , bring RPM up in forward gear and adjust for high vacuum reading at like 1800 , 2000 rpm. You might have to back off adjustment a bit after a test starting of the engine.
Sorry my written word sucks. But it is very simple and effective.

Works for me any way on the older power plants.
OFB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 09:12 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: NONE
Vessel Model: NONE
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 435
Probably already know this but if you have counter rotating props remember the port engine turns backwards and is set opposite at ATDC. I had the Crusader V6 229cid's once and made this mistake. Amazing how well they idle so far out of time. Starboard has timing gears, port has timing chain.
Capt Kangeroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 06:46 PM   #6
Guru
 
River Cruiser's Avatar
 
City: UMR MM283
Country: US
Vessel Name: Northern Lights II
Vessel Model: Bayliner 3870
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Well, let me go back a few decades to the olden days when ignition consisted of a coil and a distributer with points. Almost all ignition systems advanced timing based on engine vacuum (via a diaphragm) and rpm (based on spring loaded weights like a governor). So I believe that the proper procedure is to disconnect the vacuum hose and adjust the base timing at idle using a strobe light. David
All marine gas engines I've worked on had mechanical timing advance not vacuum. I always thought that was part of the marination of a automobile engine. Even electronic ignitions I've used had the same type of advance, you used different springs to set the advance curve. You have to make sure the linkage is free of rust & can move smoothly, a bit of lubricant helps.
__________________
Ron on Northern Lights II
I don't like making plans for the day because the word "premeditated" gets thrown around in the courtroom.
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 06:20 PM   #7
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,602
Make sure the weights move. My old boat had Crusaders and both advance mechs were frozen. I should have just replaced the distributors with new, electronic units.
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 08:25 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
capt jerry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Cruiser View Post
All marine gas engines I've worked on had mechanical timing advance not vacuum. I always thought that was part of the marination of a automobile engine. Even electronic ignitions I've used had the same type of advance, you used different springs to set the advance curve. You have to make sure the linkage is free of rust & can move smoothly, a bit of lubricant helps.
all the newer ones are advanced by the computer now days. I liked the old way better
capt jerry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 08:49 PM   #9
Guru
 
River Cruiser's Avatar
 
City: UMR MM283
Country: US
Vessel Name: Northern Lights II
Vessel Model: Bayliner 3870
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by capt jerry View Post
all the newer ones are advanced by the computer now days. I liked the old way better
I'am not very hi-tech, I liked the old type.
__________________
Ron on Northern Lights II
I don't like making plans for the day because the word "premeditated" gets thrown around in the courtroom.
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 09:10 PM   #10
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,889
Ha! High tech indeed. A boat on my dock is an old Harker's island skiff with computer EFI GM 5.7. One day it would not start, just fart and sputter. Tech called down and plugged in computer. Said something was wrong with ECU or something. Ignition failed some tests, crank position sensor doing something strange. I came down a week later to help out.

Fiddled with it a bit. Boat was out of gas.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 09:10 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
bshillam's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Our Heaven
Vessel Model: Willard 30' Searcher
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 471
When I checked both motors the advance was 10 degrees at 700 RPM which is what factory spec was. I also checked at 2600 RPM and it was 26 degrees which is what factory specs were on my distributor. So I am assuming the weights/springs are in good shape being the advance was w/i spec. Yes?
__________________
Bringing the love of wood and water together, we create something you will treasure from the day you first row, sail, or power.
bshillam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 09:26 PM   #12
Guru
 
Bob Cofer's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham
Country: US
Vessel Name: Ebbtide
Vessel Model: '72 Grand Banks
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,029
Yes. The only way you will get a completely accurate picture of the advance curve is to remove them and have them tested and the curve plotted. Total overkill for your application.
__________________
What kind of boat is that?
Bob Cofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 09:26 PM   #13
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,996
Greetings,
Mr. b. Best not to assume anything. Not a big deal to check to see of the weights and springs are fairly rust free and free to move. Remove cap and rotor take off the plate holding the points and the weights will be exposed. Wiggle the weights about with a small screwdriver. A SMALL drop of lubricant wouldn't hurt on the weight shafts. IF you decide to take off the weights and springs, make sure the parts go back on in exactly the same position-very important.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 09:31 PM   #14
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,889
BSh- Definitely lube advance mechanism as per above. That's an often neglected maintenance step. But if 10deg at 700 and 26 at 2600, advance mechanism is working. Should be good to go. What about at 3500? Check that too as it might not be on the stops at 2600. Not sure of the spec for your engine, have no idea where to find that.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 01:07 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
bshillam's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Our Heaven
Vessel Model: Willard 30' Searcher
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 471
Max degrees were at 2600 rpms between 26-29 per the manufacturer. But I will add some oil to the weights to make sure they are free.
__________________
Bringing the love of wood and water together, we create something you will treasure from the day you first row, sail, or power.
bshillam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 01:28 AM   #16
Guru
 
Bob Cofer's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham
Country: US
Vessel Name: Ebbtide
Vessel Model: '72 Grand Banks
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,029
Not sure oil is the correct choice, light grease may be better.
__________________

__________________
What kind of boat is that?
Bob Cofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012