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Old 10-27-2015, 09:20 AM   #21
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David,

Another time saver is to install a water heater bypass valve. These are available at most marine or rv stores. Rather than having to disconnect lines and add a connecting piece like you did one just turns a single valve that cuts out the water heater and combines the cold and hot systems.

John
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:22 AM   #22
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Sheesh. This winterizing concept sounds like lots of work! I'm in south Texas and wondering how much I need to winterize? We do get some hard freezes from time to time-- by hard freeze I'm talking about temps dropping under freezing for a few hours during the night but then warming up during the day. Similar to south Florida I guess? Would a decent space heater or two inside the boat be sufficient?
For just an overnight dip, you don't even need one space heater, much less two. It takes longer than that for the boat to cool down from the day's solar heat to anything close to freezing.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:45 AM   #23
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Peggie- You are right. My heat gun failed when I got to the toilet winterizing, so I didn't pull off the raw water supply hose to flush that side with antifreeze. Should have noted that in the write up. I will do that when I go back to the boat next week and secure everything once it is hauled. Heat guns are $21 now at Amazon. I think I paid more than $50 about ten years ago for the one that failed.
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David try a hose pick to get the hose off the barb. Works really easy.
FWIW I use just a little less than 3 gallons of pink to winterize the Ford-Lehman. 1 1/2 for the genny and raw water wash down. 1 1/2 for the domestic water system.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:52 PM   #24
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Sheesh. This winterizing concept sounds like lots of work!

I'm in south Texas and wondering how much I need to winterize? We do get some hard freezes from time to time-- by hard freeze I'm talking about temps dropping under freezing for a few hours during the night but then warming up during the day. Similar to south Florida I guess?

Would a decent space heater or two inside the boat be sufficient?
Really depends...local knowledge on this topic really trumps most general info.

Here in New Jersey when water temps are in the 50s, maybe even 40s, the rule of thumb is 3 consecutive nights of freezing temps before winterizing the Shamrock 26s. That is the salt water system engine cooling system only and in shallow bilges.

Some boats have fresh water tanks and plumbing pretty high up in the bilges...valves with small spaces in them and the metal quicly transferring heat could freeze and break in any good hard freeze lasting overnight. My rule of thumb would be conditions needed to freeze ice cubes in a couple hours.

All of this is hard to guess...that's why I say local knowledge is king here.
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Old 10-27-2015, 02:02 PM   #25
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Dave,
I do everything you stated to winterize but I'm more interested in the batteries. Did you take the batteries out before you got the solar charger or did you just secure your switches?
Peggie,
I must of got lucky last year since I did the same thing Dave did.
This is why I like this site so much, I learn something every time I read these post.


Thanks Jeff.
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Old 10-27-2015, 02:46 PM   #26
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Was wondering what people do about batteries. Since I can't have them on charge thru out the winter and they're a little heavy to take out, should I disconnect the cables or leave them on. My thinking was if I had a little voltage leak somewhere I could be returning to dead batteries. Any thoughts ?
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:06 PM   #27
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David try a hose pick to get the hose off the barb. Works really easy.

I have no idea what a "hose pick" is, but you don't want to use anything that will dimple a plastic fitting 'cuz dimpling prevents a hose from getting tight seal...so you'll have a source of odor you can't find, if not an actual leak.

I've always used a blow dryer (safer and a lot cheaper than a heat gun)to warm hose to make it easier to remove. Warming a bit along with a little lubrication makes it a lot easier to put the hose ONTO a fitting...Don't use Vaseline or anything that stays greasy or oily 'cuz that'll let hose work it's way off the fitting. The industry has always recommended dishwashing liquid, but K-Y surgical jelly is much slicker, is water soluble so it dries out, and available from any drug store and most supermarkets.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:14 PM   #28
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A hose pick (see pic below) won't damage anything if used properly (the ends are blunt). Auto mechanics use them every day.


I charge my batteries, then turn the switch to off. So far in 20 plus years of winterizing in Ct I've had no issues.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:47 PM   #29
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I've always used a blow dryer...

Must be something women usually have handy...



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Old 10-27-2015, 04:19 PM   #30
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Was wondering what people do about batteries. Since I can't have them on charge thru out the winter and they're a little heavy to take out, should I disconnect the cables or leave them on. My thinking was if I had a little voltage leak somewhere I could be returning to dead batteries. Any thoughts ?
Trojan says a fully charged battery will freeze at -92 degrees F. Not too worried about that. However, if the battery gets down to about 40% charged, the freeze point goes up to just to +16 degrees F - a temperature we do hit around here.

I always fully charge the batteries and then disconnect them. That makes sure there are no drains from things like CO detectors or stereo memory.
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Old 10-27-2015, 06:06 PM   #31
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Here is a follow up after I went down to finish the job after the boat was hauled. FWIW next year I will haul the boat and do everything on the hard to avoid this two step process.

First I opened all seacocks the let the water trapped in the ball cavity drain out.

Then following up on Peggie's comment I removed the suction hose to the toilet and dropped it in a jug of antifreeze and ran the toilet pump until pink stuff came out. Easy.

I also disconnected the discharge hose from the macerator pump and after elevating that hose, poured a quart or so to back flush the macerator with antifreeze. I realize that over time stuff in the holding tank could dilute that antifreeze, but I am hoping that fully pumping out the holding tank avoided that problem.

Next I considered someone's comment about any lift muffler getting enough antifreeze. So I started the genset and poured more antifreeze into the strainer and watched for pink stuff out the exhaust. It didn't take much, maybe a quart or so to get a good foamy pink out the exhaust.

The main engine was more difficult. I didn't want to restart the engine and do the same thing I did with the genset, so I disconnected the 1" hose to the exhaust mixer. It definitely had pink stuff in the hose so I was ok up to that point. Then I blew on the hose to get as much water out of the muffler as possible. I realize that your average boatyard guy wouldn't begin to do it this way, but I got 1-2 quarts out that way and it wasn't pink!! I ended up dumping almost another three gallons in that hose until I got a strong pink out. My thanks to the commenter for that tip. It may have saved the lift muffler.

So to answer someone's question about taking care of the batteries: I have four batteries and disconnecting them and taking them home to the garage would be a PITA. I installed a 100 watt solar panel to keep the batteries up while sitting on our mooring and so far that has worked very well. I keep the two house and starting battery connected in parallel with the 1,2,off, all switch and the genset start battery stays charged through the echo charge feature of my Freedom inverter/charger. That system will keep all four batteries topped up throughout the winter, even with the translucent shrink wrap over the panel. I will go back after the shrink wrap is done and confirm that.

So with my second round I am up to about 5 hours for the whole job. Maybe I can do it for 3 hours next year as I know more about what to do and do it once.

And Peggie, I used a hair dryer this time. It was much, much slower and would only heat the hose up to maybe 100 degrees. That isn't really enough to soften the hose to get it off easily. So I ordered another heat gun from Amazon for $22. A heat gun will heat the hose up to where it is too hot to touch and won't harm the hose if you don't go over that. I play the gun on the bronze fitting more than the hose to avoid getting the hose too hot.

David
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Old 10-27-2015, 06:58 PM   #32
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Like all equipment...the fastest has its drawbacks if you aren't familiar how to use it.

Like a grinder over a sander...faster but greater chance if divits.

Heat gun over hair dryer...faster, but maybe the only tool if the hose is big enough or enough metal to dissappate the heat....but a bigger chance of heat damage if not careful.


Not everyone is cut out for DIY, I know quite a few that are dangerous with a screwdriver and a screw.

I am sure you are good to go with a heat gun David....
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:14 PM   #33
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Must be something women usually have handy...
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As do most men who still have hair....
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:17 PM   #34
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A hose pick (see pic below) won't damage anything if used properly (the ends are blunt). Auto mechanics use them every day.
I've seen meat hooks blunter than those things!
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:24 PM   #35
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As to Peggy's comments: ROFL! Keep them coming please.

Your knowledgeable participation is edifying, appreciated and entertaining.
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Old 10-27-2015, 08:35 PM   #36
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As to Peggy's comments: ROFL! Keep them coming please.

Your knowledgeable participation is edifying, appreciated and entertaining.
Well, David that would depend on if you had hair or not. . . . ., and I thought Peggy was a nice lady.
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Old 10-27-2015, 09:05 PM   #37
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Well, David that would depend on if you had hair or not. . . . ., and I thought Peggy was a nice lady.
She is. And I still have some. Well, a few.
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Old 10-27-2015, 09:31 PM   #38
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And Peggie, I used a hair dryer this time. It was much, much slower and would only heat the hose up to maybe 100 degrees

You need a better hair dryer...that thing wouldn't even dry hair!
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Old 10-28-2015, 06:57 AM   #39
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As do most men who still have hair....

Think I tried a blow dryer back in the '60s sometime, what a waste of electricity.

A towel work just fine on hair... try it sometime!



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Old 10-28-2015, 07:48 AM   #40
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By the time I find the hairdryer I don't need it anymore.
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