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Old 09-08-2014, 10:14 PM   #41
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I wrote a piece about this exact subject relating the way to protect yourself in the same way that medical devices are made and tested.

https://activecaptain.com/newsletters/2014-02-26.php

It provides a link to the $9 part (used to be $12) that every boater should have onboard.
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:47 PM   #42
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I dont have the ability to connect directly to city water. I certainly wouldnt trust my boat to a 40 dollar pressure regulator. Even if i did, I wouldn't think it a wise decision. But that's just me.
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Old 09-09-2014, 07:13 AM   #43
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You trust your boat to a whole bunch of things that cost a lot less than 40 bucks. A regulator and a device like that in Jeff's article cost less than $40 combined.
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Old 09-09-2014, 10:25 AM   #44
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You trust your boat to a whole bunch of things that cost a lot less than 40 bucks.
How many of our boats can easily be put into serious danger by the failure of a hose clamp or two? I don't think it's much less than 100%.
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Old 09-09-2014, 10:34 AM   #45
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I'm paranoid about "ice bugs" so I disinfect all of the ice I use with some type of alcohol.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:10 AM   #46
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You trust your boat to a whole bunch of things that cost a lot less than 40 bucks. A regulator and a device like that in Jeff's article cost less than $40 combined.
Well, that is true, but on the other side of that 40 dollar regulator is 100 psi hose that can dump up 15-20 gallons a minute. That's 900-1200 gallons per hour or 7200-9600 lbs per hour. My boat displaces 22000 lbs. So a 3/4" garden hose hose could theoretically displace my boat in just over 2 hours. Not to mention the damage it would do. And from what I see in most (if not all) boats, the 'plumbing system' is far less robust than what I see on land based homes.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:20 AM   #47
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Well, I have 2 2000 per hr and 1 1500 an hour pumps. I have an alarm that no one can live with within 100 yards. I do not have a city water inlet. I could live with a limiting regulator. 600 gallon then shuts off. I would still cut off when leaving but another layer of protection could not hurt.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:21 AM   #48
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All nice...but if you turn it off when away....no issue.

Like many things in boatng...forgetting something can become a big issue no matter whatyou are doing or where you are....

Everyone has their comfort zone and like I have posted many times..liveaboards often do things a bit different...because.....
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:23 AM   #49
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On the Mainship I forgot more than once.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:27 AM   #50
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On the Mainship I forgot more than once.

Did it ever sink from the fresh water hose?
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:30 AM   #51
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1) If you turn the water off at the pedestal there is a chance someone will turn it back on. Best to disconnect the hose and store it.

2) Garden center products are not as robust as marine products should be. When that $9.00 timer fails at home, you just overwater your lawn. When it fails "protecting" your boat, that's much more serious.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:30 AM   #52
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Used food grade hose, I also had an RV inline charcoal filter I changed out Quaterly.. So no.
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Old 09-09-2014, 11:38 AM   #53
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In 10 years of living aboard...no one has ever "turned my water back on".

Again...if you are living aboard your boat (or when you are even if not full time)...I think it's completely different than when you leave for the week or longer. Sure at that point disconnect.

But all these great maintained boats everyone brags about here need to recheck their plumbing...

Mineis just as robust as the local, newly built homes...mine is all brand ne pex with all good fittings.

Plus I trust my bilge pumps to keep up with a garden hose...if I didn't expect that...I'm not sure going too far away from land is a good idea then.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:50 AM   #54
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>I have 2 2000 per hr and 1 1500 an hour pumps.<

Pumps are rated with no head , ask them to lift the water 2-4 or more ft and the water removed may be 1/2 or less.

On ships they get away from this , somewhat, by just pumping the water out , thru the hull, rather than lifting it.

But they use very different pumps from the $59.00 boaters special.

AS a 20+ year liveaboard , I never installed a dock pressure system.

Using the water tanks keeps them fresh and work required 2-3 days away , so why take the risk?
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Old 09-10-2014, 10:33 AM   #55
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Did it ever sink from the fresh water hose?
Nope, been lucky..on new boat on direct hook up, new spare fresh water pump on the ready. Will not have that on my mind anymore.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:54 PM   #56
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Most boats don't sink from city water leaks. Some do. As long as you're in the group that doesn't you'll be fine. The easiest way to be sure you're in that group is to not leave the city water connected. Fill the tanks and disconnect the hose.
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Old 09-10-2014, 08:51 PM   #57
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The plumbing on a boat should be every bit as robust as that on land. If not, and/or if not inspected and maintained, then you will have an issue with a "tank/pump only" one of these days. If one regulator is too scary, use two. If you are afraid the metering device will fail, or that some evil doer will turn your water back on and your crappy plumbing will fail and sink your boat, unhook the hose. This is one of those boating bogeymen that always has bemused me, especially when I see people who are super paranoid about this issue blithely leave their shore power on and connected 24/7...
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Old 09-11-2014, 06:43 AM   #58
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For folks that go cruising you MUST taste the water before putting it into your tanks.

Sure it may all be potable, but some tastes like a drained public swimming pool ,some is worse!

Multiple tanks is desired so you can still operate with out taking on board near sewage.
Or IF you are desperate only one tank can be filled , and dumped as soon as better water is available.
A 2 inch drain in a water tank is advised.
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Old 09-11-2014, 12:28 PM   #59
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Btw folks, the relatively new product called PEX is great for your water systems. Both the shark and crimp (special crimper kit) I think is great. Way better than copper.
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Old 09-11-2014, 12:53 PM   #60
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Btw folks, the relatively new product called PEX is great for your water systems. Both the shark and crimp (special crimper kit) I think is great. Way better than copper.
I don't know that it is way better than copper, functionality and durability wise, but it is sure easier to work with, and you can get adaptors to add to a legacy copper system. I like the SeaTech stuff for a lot of applications in that it does not require special tools and is easy to disassemble if you have to.
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