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Old 08-11-2015, 06:39 PM   #21
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Thickness of the backing plate I think would depend on the thickness of the hull. Thinner hull, thicker, larger backing plate to spread loads out. But on my sailboat, when I replaced my thru hulls (original bronze "volcanoes"), the hull was ~3/4" thick in these areas. . .the 1/4" G-10 backing plates I used were more so to provide an even bearing/sealing area for the flanged adapters than stiffening up the area
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Old 08-12-2015, 06:51 AM   #22
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The key to remember is when properly installed you should be able to JUMP on the seacock with no problems.
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Old 08-12-2015, 09:20 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by angus99 View Post
Maybe these will help.

This is looking down through the inside (actually outside) of the seachest at the through hulls. (The top one is a drain.)

A nice thing about this setup is that the valves and through hulls can easily be replaced if that's ever necessary. The backing plates are also MUCH stronger than the original plywood plates on my boat, some of which I could peel off by hand. They also don't absorb moisture like the plywood plates.

Thanks, the inside shot does indeed clarify. Must be the adapter plates (with the 6 holes) on the outside of the sea chest, and I was thinking those were the backers that could have been on the inside. Or maybe I was thinking the backer plates were about holding the seacock flange tight, when it's maybe really also about holding the thrull-hull part tight as it leads from the inside.

Either way to think about it, nice installation!

-Chris
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Old 08-14-2015, 06:15 AM   #24
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Epoxy ( thickened) the flange to the hull and be sure the thru hull is installed with sealant (like Dolphinite) and never a glue like 5200.
Please expand on this if you don't mind
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:04 AM   #25
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There are 2 seperate items , the seacock and the thru hull that serves it.
i
The seacock is usually bolted in place with 3/8 bolts thru the hull, or today's method by gluing a mount pad inside the hull.And bolting to it.

Either way the unit is at least semi perminiant as it does not have to be removed for service , just perhaps replacement after a decade or 5.

5200 is OK as removal is seldom if ever required

The threaded thru hull screws into the sea cock from outside the boat.

It may need to be inspected at times (normal on Pax for hire boats) or when it turns pink from some electric source.

A tool stuck in and turned with a wrench will remove it quickly and a quick clean up with a wire brush will show if its fit to be reinstalled.

The thru hull reinstall uses a sealant NOT A GLUE! to make the process easy the next time.
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Old 08-14-2015, 07:27 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
There are 2 seperate items , the seacock and the thru hull that serves it.
i
The seacock is usually bolted in place with 3/8 bolts thru the hull, or today's method by gluing a mount pad inside the hull.And bolting to it.

Either way the unit is at least semi perminiant as it does not have to be removed for service , just perhaps replacement after a decade or 5.

5200 is OK as removal is seldom if ever required

The threaded thru hull screws into the sea cock from outside the boat.

It may need to be inspected at times (normal on Pax for hire boats) or when it turns pink from some electric source.

A tool stuck in and turned with a wrench will remove it quickly and a quick clean up with a wire brush will show if its fit to be reinstalled.

The thru hull reinstall uses a sealant NOT A GLUE! to make the process easy the next time.
Fred is spot on. I'd only add that Groco now gives the option of a "two-piece seacock." The base (they call it a flanged adapter) is bolted (and inevitably epoxied) to the round backing plate. The backing plate in turn is epoxied to the hull and this makes for a very robust connection. The valve, or operating part of this assembly, then threads to the flanged adapter. If you use the right sealant, as Fred notes, both the valve and through hull can be removed or replaced if necessary without disturbing the backing plate or flanged adapter.

Also, the flanged adaptor has the correct threads to accept both the through hull (NPS threads) and the valve (NPT threads). Lots of warnings out there about trying to marry through hulls into old style seacocks or valves with mismatched threads.
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