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Old 09-15-2012, 09:43 PM   #1
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As seen on TV!

Hoses on boats can be a pain. I have purchased and worn out a number of the lay flat types on a reel that store in a small space, but are easily punctured and kink constantly. The handles on the reels seem to be designed by the Marquis de Sade and always break. Regular garden hose doesn't wear out and kinks less, but doesn't store well. I only have one season on this, but so far, the first image is my all time favorite. It's called an X-hose, and while it may be no Veg-O-matic, it sure seems to work well. Only problem is that when you pressurize it, it gets 25' long from about 10', but when you open the nozzle the pressure drops so it wants to shrink back to about 20'. Other than that, great hose and very light. https://www.xhose.com/index.php?page=Home

The other two photos are of a tool I bought at the Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend. I had seen this before but actually paid attention this time and bought one. It allows you to use stainless steel wire to create any size hose clamp, and while it definitely takes longer than grabbing a clamp and screwing it on, the result is a lot cleaner, and seems more mechanically sound. The guy who makes these claims that he has tested a 4 wrap clamp on hydraulic hose up to 5000 psi. Maybe, but it certainly seems to work better than clamps on the few places I have used it so far. Nice not to ever lack the right size clamp as well. www.akcooltools.com
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Old 09-15-2012, 11:07 PM   #2
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Actually, I was wondering myself how well the expandable hose would work on a boat. I already picked-up my wire clamp maker at the last boat show. It does lend a margin of safety with anything one needs to clamp,....especially extra large hoses.
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Old 09-15-2012, 11:49 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
Actually, I was wondering myself how well the expandable hose would work on a boat. I already picked-up my wire clamp maker at the last boat show. It does lend a margin of safety with anything one needs to clamp,....especially extra large hoses.
I was skeptical, just based on the cheesy advertising, but after a season of use, I've ordered a couple more to replace my other hoses.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:37 AM   #4
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We used steel wire instead of hose clamps for air hoses in an industrial plant. Worked perfectly and there was no trouble of the clamps catching on things as the hoses where drug around. Never had a hose failure related to the wire clamps. Inventory control was simplified too. Great stuff.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:09 AM   #5
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Are these units RATED for potable water (tank filling) or just deck washing?

Not all plastic is good to injest!
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Old 09-16-2012, 09:24 AM   #6
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Are these units RATED for potable water (tank filling) or just deck washing?
Not all plastic is good to injest!
Someone will be along shortly to explain that those "drinking water safe" labels are just to get people to pay more for the same product just like the "marine" label on boat parts.

I'm going to just sit back and enjoy.
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Old 09-16-2012, 09:13 PM   #7
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Someone will be along shortly to explain that those "drinking water safe" labels are just to get people to pay more for the same product just like the "marine" label on boat parts.

I'm going to just sit back and enjoy.
I dont believe that As a full time live aboard I know water from a regular garden hose has a nasty taste not present from a potable water hose See thread on foamy water
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:31 PM   #8
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Delfin, Thanks for the great tip on the ClampTite. If there's the working room, it looks like the perfect solution to carrying a bag full of clamps of various sizes. Does anyone know if this clamp system passes the muster of surveyors re: adequate clamping for marine purposes?

I went ahead and ordered a ClampTite for various jobs on the boat. Already have lots of SS 304 safety wire (0.041) around the house and boat so it's a natural addition.

To those considering the hose for fillling water tanks, it doesn't look like the hose would be a great water tank filling hose anyway, unless you like to fill your tank with a spray nozzle on the hose end. If there's no pressure, the hose stays short and coiled...not exactly what you want when filling your freshwater tank. But might make a great compact washdown hose.
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:52 PM   #9
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I watched the video on the Clamptite and also thought it was pretty cool..if you're attaching a fitting to a garden hose. But how to you use it when you are trying to clamp a hose in tight quarters, where it's hard enough just to work a long-handled screwdriver back in there to tighten a clamp? (I am thinking about hoses on A/C, etc that connect to hose-barbs already attached to the equipment). Also, when you need to remove a hose, it looks like it might be hard to get that wire off without damaging the hose. Comments?
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:53 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
Delfin, Thanks for the great tip on the ClampTite. If there's the working room, it looks like the perfect solution to carrying a bag full of clamps of various sizes. Does anyone know if this clamp system passes the muster of surveyors re: adequate clamping for marine purposes?

I went ahead and ordered a ClampTite for various jobs on the boat. Already have lots of SS 304 safety wire (0.041) around the house and boat so it's a natural addition.

To those considering the hose for fillling water tanks, it doesn't look like the hose would be a great water tank filling hose anyway, unless you like to fill your tank with a spray nozzle on the hose end. If there's no pressure, the hose stays short and coiled...not exactly what you want when filling your freshwater tank. But might make a great compact washdown hose.
You're welcome. I think you'll need 316 stainless wire, but I am not sure about that. There is a tremendous amount of pressure put on the wire when you apply tension, and 304 might be too soft. You're right about needing adequate room, though. The tensioner is about 8" long, and you need to be able to move it through a 120 degree arc when finishing off the clamp, before cutting the wire. One trick I learned that isn't documented is to use needle nose pliers to make two 90 degree bends in the wire to start, rather than just bend it in a loop. This makes the finish appearance must neater.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:04 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by ARoss View Post
I watched the video on the Clamptite and also thought it was pretty cool..if you're attaching a fitting to a garden hose. But how to you use it when you are trying to clamp a hose in tight quarters, where it's hard enough just to work a long-handled screwdriver back in there to tighten a clamp? (I am thinking about hoses on A/C, etc that connect to hose-barbs already attached to the equipment). Also, when you need to remove a hose, it looks like it might be hard to get that wire off without damaging the hose. Comments?
Actually, I thought it might be easier to remove than a clamp. Just clip the wire carefully to avoid nicking the hose, and it's off. I also wonder whether it might be easier to remove a hose that has been wire clamped vs band clamped. The band puts a wider area under pressure compared to the wire, which is more even and more localized. Don't know, but it seems like the hose might release easier, which for me is always a problem. I usually end up cutting the end off the hose because I can't free it up, so I will be interested in testing this at some point.

But you're right, there will be places where you won't be able to use this - as noted, you'll need about 8 inches clearance through 120 degrees or so to make the finishing roll over. I've been eyeing different clamps in some pretty tight spots, and I think I can use it in most places, but probably not all.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:37 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
You're welcome. I think you'll need 316 stainless wire, but I am not sure about that. There is a tremendous amount of pressure put on the wire when you apply tension, and 304 might be too soft.
The higher the SS number, the more corrosion resistance, but the less the strength. Here's what the ClampTite FAQ has to say on the issue:

"
What are some wire type advantages?

  1. Our stainless steel grade 304 wire is very corrosion resistant, has good strength, is annealed for ease of use, and is available in all our standard sizes as well as in a 1 lb can. It is the same stainless steel grade on most boat rails and external fittings.
  2. Our stainless steel grade 316L wire is very corrosion resistant (more so than 304), has slightly less strength, is annealed but is more stiff and slightly more difficult to use then the 304. It is available from us in sizes .041" dia. small rolls and large rolls.
  3. Our 400 series wire (monel equivalent) is extremely corrosion resistant (for under water or similar uses), has much less strength, is flexible and easy to use, is dull grey in color. It is available from us in sizes .041"dia and small rolls."
ClampTite - The Official Website
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:56 AM   #13
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Ah so, thank you. I had it assbackwards. Apparently they recommended the 316 to me as a compromise of qualities for general use.
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:11 AM   #14
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Stainless Steel Grades and Mechanical Properties

Well now I am confused. There doesn't seem to be much difference in the physical characteristics between 304 and 316 other than corrosion resistance. I can't imagine 5 points of hardness on the Brinnell scale would make a difference but maybe it does. 316 also appears to have greater ductility.
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Old 09-17-2012, 01:26 PM   #15
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I dont believe that As a full time live aboard I know water from a regular garden hose has a nasty taste not present from a potable water hose See thread on foamy water
I use only a "drinking water safe" white hose to fill my water tanks. When I'm not using it, I keep it stored on the boat where it won't be borrowed or used for anything else. By using a clean hose and clean source, I don't have the problems some other people report.

It's never been a problem to store. I just roll it up and use a velcro strap to keep it coiled. Actually, I have two 25' hoses. One is usually sufficient but occasionally I'll have to break out the other one when visiting somewhere.

I keep a standard "garden hose" on the dock pedestal for washing the boat or the dock. There's no telling what others might use it for when I'm not around to guard it.
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Old 09-17-2012, 04:04 PM   #16
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Like Ron we have a pair of 25' hoses that we use to fill the water tanks. They are basic, green garden hoses (with plastic nozzles and hook-up fittings) that we bought probably from Home Depot 14 years ago. We use them only for filling the water tanks but we have not found they impart any taste to the water. Perhaps if they were part of a permanent water hookup for a liveaboard they would.

We also have a longer hose that we keep in the dockbox that we use for filling the tanks when we're in our slip, washing the boat, etc. As it's kept locked up there is no issue with other people using it for unknown purposes.
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Old 09-17-2012, 05:10 PM   #17
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http://www.leadprevention.org/web/up...ose%205_03.pdf

From consumer reports.....

Wed answer that question by saying its OK to drink from a hose only if its labeled safe or if you flush it first.
Otherwise, the water standing inside may contain worrisome amounts of lead and other chemicals that leach
from the hose itself. Many hoses are made of polyvinyl chloride, which uses lead as a stabilizer.

Seems like the problem is letting water stand in the hose...if flushed first...even the bad hoses aren't all that bad....maybe better than having an overpriced hose that you DO use standing water from.

What it really sounds like is TMI....from those just like people who think you will die from eating that peanut you dropped on the floor.....obviously they have never eaten from a decent survival course menu....
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:00 AM   #18
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The rest of the story:

Quote:
We’d answer that question by saying it’s OK to drink from a hose only if it’s labeled safe or if you flush it first.
Otherwise, the water standing inside may contain worrisome amounts of lead and other chemicals that leach from the hose itself. Many hoses are made of polyvinyl chloride, which uses lead as a stabilizer.
We tested 16 new hoses, brands sold at national chains and on the Internet. Four were labeled safe for drinking; six had warning labels. The remaining six weren’t labeled either way.
The four hoses labeled safe for drinking typically contained less lead in their construction than the others. In our tests, those hoses leached minuscule amounts of lead into water that had been standing in the hose for 20 hours or more. We measured concentrations well below 15 parts per billion, the level in drinking water at which the Environmental Protection Agency requires remedial action. In fact, tap water contained as much lead as some samples. (The time the water stands in the hose, water temperature and acidity all affect the amount of lead leaching.) Hoses containing the highest amounts of lead, only two of which carried a "do not drink" label, leached 10 to 100 times allowable lead levels in the first draw of standing water.
However, even extremely low levels of lead may cause health problems. A recent study reported in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests that lead levels in the blood even lower than the current definition of toxicity may adversely affect a child’s IQ.

The bottom line.

When you buy a hose, choose one labeled safe for drinking. With any hose, flush it by letting the water run for a minute or so before you drink.
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:09 AM   #19
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But the quote is "OR" (not "and") and I'm educated enough to read between the lines anyhow with today's "everything is a scare" and in print recommendations are done/reviewed by lawyer standards instead of real people....

I would go on and on about how most don't drink from their tanks anyway, or use sophisticated filtering systems for all the other things beyond lead that come in your water.... but I know many here are smart enough to know that also....
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Old 09-19-2012, 06:19 AM   #20
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Folks traveling in Fl should be aware that some docks may have 2 types of water.

The expensive RO water usually has to be asked for , as there may be a charge.

The recycled water , toilet flush water or lawn water is used for boat washing.

A square key (carry one aboard) is required for the RO water.
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