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Old 01-02-2015, 05:29 PM   #81
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I don't buy the whole "my boat is too big" or "I just have too many of them". In aviation, the more complex the plane, systems, checks, etc...the longer the preflight. That comes with the territory of moving on up in size. Not to mention it makes you physically go down and look at everything else in the ER and keeps the seacocks from seizing up. I do like the idea of hanging the engine keys on the handle!


I don't understand the problem, a good check only takes minutes if you are familiar with the equipment and you do it often.


Then again I'm the type of guy that looks at my truck underneath quickly before driving any time. Puddles is troubles...
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Old 01-02-2015, 06:40 PM   #82
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Just a thought:
water would pass a leak 1m below waterline with ~ 4.4 m/s. Considering an open 1" seacock this would end up with ~ 7800 liter / hour or 2000 gph.
Please compare this figure to the real as built rating (! Not catalogue rating!) of your pumps.
(And 1.5" instead of 1" would more than double the flow rate ...)

However, we do normally not close our seacocks, only if leaving the boat for a couple of weeks. During the season we show up at least once a week. And we rely on the day by day inspection we perform every time we're on board which would lead to appropriate maintenance in case of any doubt ...



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Old 01-03-2015, 11:07 AM   #83
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Our new to us boat has Groco seacocks for the most part. They are all in need of freeing up. They are the style that have a "wingnut" style fastener at the narrow end of the taper. I am going to try a heat gun in combination with loosening the tension nut off, to free them up. There is visible grease where the plug goes into the body of the seacock so I am hopeful. The main engine seacocks are from Sarco. They have a "y" configuration, but the part that "y's" off has a cap with about a 1" square plug in it. I'm wondering if there is some kind of strainer in the "y". I was able to free one yesterday, I am paying for it with a sore neck and shoulder today. I tapped the handle with a rubber mallet until it began to move, then push it closed. It took a pretty good effort to pull it back open but I worked it back and forth a few times and it became freer. I am going to remove the handle from the other sarco and put a large spanner or socket over the square end on the tapered plug, then tap it with my mallet, hoping it comes free. I can't seem to find much out about Sarco other than it would seem they don't make seacocks anymore. They manufacture steam valves and pipeline valves now.
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Old 01-03-2015, 04:16 PM   #84
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I use an 8" long piece of pipe to slip over the handle of a seacock giving some extra leverage so no hammering is necessary if it is stubborn.
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Old 01-04-2015, 12:24 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmason View Post
I use an 8" long piece of pipe to slip over the handle of a seacock giving some extra leverage so no hammering is necessary if it is stubborn.
I can see that as a good method to reduce the effort involved once the seacocks are freed up. The biggest ones on the boat, the engine raw water supplies, port side I freed up, starboard is still frozen. The starboard handle is already bent so I am thinking it is not going to be easy to rotate the seacock.
I plan to loosen off the tension nut a 1/2 turn, then give the tension nut a sharp rap with a hammer, using a wood block as a damper. This might move it back enough to free the tapered drum.
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Old 01-04-2015, 12:41 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmason View Post
I use an 8" long piece of pipe to slip over the handle of a seacock giving some extra leverage so no hammering is necessary if it is stubborn.
To free up my stiff seacocks I found a long spark plug socket wrench a perfect tool to use for the purpose of getting that extra leverage on the seacock handle.
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Old 01-04-2015, 06:54 AM   #87
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If your using a hammer I would suggest to make sure you have various size plugs handy. A friend of mine did this and the sea cock was so corroded that it literally broke off. Not fun, he was at a marina when he did it and they pulled it right away.
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Old 01-04-2015, 08:40 AM   #88
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My assumption was that talking about the need of a hammer and / or significant increased forces to move the handle of a fretted seacock we would talk about boats standing high and dry on land?

We have one fretted seacock sitting exactly at the waterline. All attempts with reasonable forces on the handle failed so we put it on the list for the next time on the yard ...




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Old 01-05-2015, 08:02 AM   #89
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> All attempts with reasonable forces on the handle failed<

Has the unit drain plugs that can be removed and zerk fittings installed?

Many times just pulling the fitting and spraying with PB Blaster is enough.

When you pull the boat some VERY! fine emery cloth on the interior barrel , followed with lapping together with fine valve grinding compound should have it back in shape for another 30 years.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:09 PM   #90
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Thanks. We will be out for a week this year, this seacock is one of the action items on our list.



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Old 01-05-2015, 08:25 PM   #91
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I had another go at the large seacock for the starboard raw water intake today. Put a 12-point socket on it with a 1/2" long handled torque wrench. Still no go. I tried all three of the smaller ones farther forward as well, without success. I pulled the water drain plug out of the big one, there was grease on the end of the plug. I'm going to try screwing a grease fitting into it and see if I can pump some grease in. If that fails to work on any of them, I am planning on hauling out in March, so I'll get after it then.
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Old 01-05-2015, 09:24 PM   #92
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This thread reminds me of standing/jumping on the OEM wrench to change a car tyre, after someone overtightened it with an air wrench. Don`t get too aggressive, a fountain in the bilge is not pretty. I too left mine until a haul out.
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Old 01-06-2015, 12:25 AM   #93
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I hate for something like this to get the best of me! I recently completed a nut and bolt rotisserie restoration of a 1970 Charger R/T. I did not twist off a single bolt. I am going to keep at it, as it seems like having to haul the boat to look after this seems a bit like defeat to me. I will if I have to though!
Meanwhile I am exercising the 1 free valve every time I am at the boat, and it is getting much easier.
I think eventually, I would be inclined to close all the seacocks every time we left the boat, but doing that would require following a checklist before taking the boat out. I do like Marin's idea of having the engine raw water intakes left open in case the boat needs to be moved by somebody else. I started my 6V53 Detroits today, and as I first cranked one with the fuel shut off for 10 seconds, then for another 10 seconds to get it going, and then repeated the process again with the other, I thought, " nobody that has not started these before will crank them that long, or without fuel to build blower pressure" I hope it never happens...
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Old 01-06-2015, 12:52 AM   #94
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http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/replacing_thruhulls

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/seacock_primer

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/s...ailure_testing

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/t..._cone_seacocks

A little light reading on the subject for those inclined to study up a bit.
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Old 01-06-2015, 05:40 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
This thread reminds me of standing/jumping on the OEM wrench to change a car tyre, after someone overtightened it with an air wrench. Don`t get too aggressive, a fountain in the bilge is not pretty. I too left mine until a haul out.
Like he said…
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:18 AM   #96
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BEWARE , Sea cocks are simple castings , esp the center barrel which is thin after machining.WEAK WEAK WEAK!

The >best< way to free it is by loosening the nut and lock nut and gently tapping the barrel free.

The taper is steep , so 1/4 inch of movement will let a bunch of water flood in.
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Old 01-06-2015, 11:20 AM   #97
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RC at Compass Marine has a great webpage of boating How To articles...
Included is one for Servicing Tapered Cone Seacocks
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Old 01-06-2015, 11:33 AM   #98
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Any comments on this seacock replacement job on a boat I am considering?
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Old 01-06-2015, 11:46 AM   #99
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We keep raw water intake and fuel feeds closed when at a dock.

One thing to remember with high water alarms is that some have a battery inside the alarm module which will last a long time but eventually need replacing. (there i go adding another thing on the maintenance schedule)

Oh and I second Tom's procedure of having a sign reminding us to open seacocks before starting the engine. We've cut a small slit in ours and actually put the key thru it. Some peace of mind that it won't be inadvertently moved.
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Old 01-06-2015, 01:35 PM   #100
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Greetings,
Mr. BO. Flange does not appear to be bolted through the hull and a bit stingy on the bedding material IMO. Personally, I prefer the tapered seacocks rather than the ball type. Oh, and connect up that bonding wire. Job appears overall to be half done.
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