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Old 08-04-2013, 07:22 PM   #21
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Oh ya...forgot about that one. It remains closed and secured at all times. The hand pump deteriorated years ago. Being nin the bay/delta area, I see no reason to repair it or replace it with a macerator pump.

I like the locking collar on your seacock, Mark. Nice touch.
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:15 PM   #22
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No. I do exercise them periodically, but they remain open at all times unless I'm performing maintenance that requires them closed. When they're closed, I place a prominent flag on the keys alerting me that they are closed.
We know your background. We hang the keys on the engine thru hull when closed.
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:16 PM   #23
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Now that's a simple solution I like!!
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:23 PM   #24
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We know your background. We hang the keys on the engine thru hull when closed.
Larry, that is so brilliantly simple
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Old 08-04-2013, 11:08 PM   #25
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I leave mine open but I use the boat year round.
I am on it every single weekend.

I don't need to go into the engine room as much nowadays. I fixed everything just the way I want it. I am out of things to work on. Everything works perfectly.

For years My mate and I always had a system in progress. From electrical to plumbing. Hydraulics, rudder and steering.you name it. It's all done.
Just changed all the hoses and belts in April.
Doing a little fiberglass repair now but I am doing that in rout to destination.

I will admit I still have a few gremlins on board.
Fine tuning tinkering and fiddling with things aboard is what makes boating a joy to me.

I really do need to work the valve once in a while.
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Old 08-04-2013, 11:17 PM   #26
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No, live only 15 minutes from the Marina. Hopefully the night security would notice the boot stripe sinking and call me. They call me about everything else, loose canvas, fenders crushing, left something on the dock. but I suppose they would miss that one until the boat capsized. lol

I should get in the habit of doing that when out of town, probably a good idea??

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Old 08-05-2013, 11:39 AM   #27
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I start the engine from the engine room, so I can see hear and feel what is going on, so its no big deal to open/close the thru hulls. When we leave for more than a couple days, I also close the thru hulls above the water line except for the bilge pumps.

If/when we do not live on the boat I plan on installing a alarm system like the Boat Nanny http://www.theboatnanny.com/index.html That will call 3 numbers if something is wrong on the boat.
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Old 08-05-2013, 07:05 PM   #28
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I start the engine from the engine room, so I can see hear and feel what is going on, so its no big deal to open/close the thru hulls. When we leave for more than a couple days, I also close the thru hulls above the water line except for the bilge pumps.

If/when we do not live on the boat I plan on installing a alarm system like the Boat Nanny http://www.theboatnanny.com/index.html That will call 3 numbers if something is wrong on the boat.
I have an alarm system that I use on my boat, similar to the boat nanny.

The piece of mind that knowing you"'ll get a email and text if anything goes Amis on your boat is invaluable
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:34 PM   #29
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No, I have never heard of a cared for boat sinking due to open Seacocks...... and I am also a heavily insured individual. Helps me sleep better at night.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:11 PM   #30
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I close the engine sea cock when I go home. No trouble remembering to open it since it is part of my routine arrival procedure. It is an older boat and I do not really know the condition of the bits and pieces yet.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:20 PM   #31
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No, I have never heard of a cared for boat sinking due to open Seacocks...... and I am also a heavily insured individual. Helps me sleep better at night.
Can't say that's 100 % correct ....but I agree...

Yesterday when working on my fuel system...I saw that the last time I cleaned my Air Conditioner strainer...I forgot to put the clamps back on the hose from the seacock to the strainer (up at the strainer bottom-forespar type strainer).

Feel like a fool ...but because the hose was only about 18 months old and still pliable...and not on a pressurized line...no leaks for over a week.

So you could look at this 2 ways...if you always close them..forgetting clamps or having them fail or the hose fail is no biggie...

or look at it the other way...if you don't close them the chances of your boat sinking from a failed hose or clamp is extraordinary small if your hoses aren't ancient.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:24 AM   #32
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Thanks for the input. I know the topic has been discussed before, but I like to get opinions of some new folks also.

The reason I inquired is that now that I live on the boat, I leave the seacocks open all the time. Iíve been making quite a few trips off the boat lasting a week or more and it just seems to be a pain in the butt to go around and close all the seacocks every time. Iíve got at least a dozen. It seems that every now and then I find one that I hadnít seen before, even though Iíve crawled through every inch of the boat. I even found one for a water maker that was removed quite some time ago.
The surveyor gave me a schematic of the boat identifying the location of the seacocks. He sure missed quite a few.

I know I certainly have much more piece of mind when Iím away from the boat knowing that that at least the ones below the waterline are closed (which is what I do now), some of which are quite difficult to reach, which seems counter intuitive.

A PM post said that a couple of boats did sink in their marina due to hose or clamp failure.
I wonder if the folks whose boats sank where able to collect insurance if the sinking were due to a failure of a thruhull with an open below the waterline seacock and the owners were off the boat. I canít find anything in my policy that addresses that scenario.

Which leads me to another inquiry (the OP said I can hijack the thread) about boats sinking in marinas.

If there was a fire in your marina and the staff were able to save your boat only by moving it but couldnít get a boat over to it in time to tow it, could they gain access to your boats helm and start the engine/s to get it out of harmís way? KJ
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Old 08-06-2013, 07:54 AM   #33
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The first thing I did when I bought my boat was replace every hose that came from a seacock, and put new, high quality hose clamps on both ends, double clamped. I've lived aboard a long time, and never close them unless I'm doing some sort of service.

As to the marina moving my boat, they would never do that. They could, if they grabbed the key set they keep in the office, but the last fire we had, the USCG towed a boat or two out of the way to make a fire break.
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Old 08-06-2013, 08:51 AM   #34
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No. I do exercise them periodically, but they remain open at all times unless I'm performing maintenance that requires them closed. When they're closed, I place a prominent flag on the keys alerting me that they are closed.
Ditto

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Old 08-06-2013, 09:02 AM   #35
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We've lived aboard for almost 4 years. There are boats in our marina with absentee owners (I.e.snowbirds) who leave their air conditioning on for 4-8 months while they are gone. A few have someone checking on them but most are unattended and I'm amazed that none have sunk so far .

We leave our thru hulls open with a wooden plug attached to each and we exercise them every couple of weeks.

Gina
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Old 08-06-2013, 12:02 PM   #36
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No, for the port to figure out how to start and move each boat would take way to long.

Our docks are concrete, metal, with no covered slips. So the ignition points are limited to the boats themselves. Boat fires can spread so quickly from boat-to-boat that the fire dept would quickly cut the endangered boats loose and push them out of their slips. The port has a tow tug, open aluminum inboard skiff that is capable of handling all but the largest boats in the marina.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:21 PM   #37
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Which leads me to another inquiry (the OP said I can hijack the thread) about boats sinking in marinas.

If there was a fire in your marina and the staff were able to save your boat only by moving it but couldn’t get a boat over to it in time to tow it, could they gain access to your boats helm and start the engine/s to get it out of harm’s way? KJ
I have perhaps a unique relationship with my harbor master. He has my permission to be aboard my boat and I routinely hire he or his staff to perform tasks I have not the time to do myself.

That said, if a fire broke out in my wooden boat house I would much rather deal with the insurance company after the fact than see anyone risk injury or worse making what I would consider a heroic effort to save my boat. As much as we adore our little boat it is ultimately only an item that can be replaced.
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Old 08-06-2013, 02:21 PM   #38
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We've lived aboard for almost 4 years. There are boats in our marina with absentee owners (I.e.snowbirds) who leave their air conditioning on for 4-8 months while they are gone. A few have someone checking on them but most are unattended and I'm amazed that none have sunk so far .

We leave our thru hulls open with a wooden plug attached to each and we exercise them every couple of weeks.

Gina
Gina, can you explain this for me?
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Old 08-06-2013, 05:31 PM   #39
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Gina, can you explain this for me?
We bought packs of wooden pegs from West Marine (they come in packs of assorted sizes). We drilled a hole through each , put a piece of string thru it and tied it to the thru hull handle. The idea is that by tying it to the thru hull handle its ready to be placed in a hole to fill the breech if needed. We actually know someone who had a thru hull hose failure and the wooden peg saved his boat.

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Old 08-06-2013, 06:31 PM   #40
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I have a sea chest w/ two valves on it; engine raw water and water to the head for flushing. Also have one seacock below waterline for blackwater tank outlet (where approved). When I leave the boat all are closed. When I was new at this I started the engine a couple times w/ raw water closed; $40 dollar replacement impellers forced me to make a laminated list for startup and shutdown, so that doesn't happen anymore. For me, closed seacocks are peace of mind.
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