Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2019, 08:29 PM   #1
Member
 
Me and Boo's Avatar
 
City: Annapolis
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Buena Ventura
Vessel Model: Ocean Yachts 46 Sunliner
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23
Replumb with PEX

My boat has reached a point in time when the grey colored water lines are falling apart. After doing research I find the only logical replacement to be PEX.



Has anyone else replumbed their boat using PEX?
Your experiences are important as I look at this project.
__________________
Advertisement

Me and Boo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 08:32 PM   #2
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me and Boo View Post
My boat has reached a point in time when the grey colored water lines are falling apart. After doing research I find the only logical replacement to be PEX.



Has anyone else replumbed their boat using PEX?
Your experiences are important as I look at this project.
I did that 2 years ago, I expect it to survive myself.
Used blue pipe for cold water, red for hot. Used manifolds to be able to isolate any line.
Very easy to do if you plan it properly.

L
__________________

Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 08:47 PM   #3
Guru
 
Ken E.'s Avatar
 
City: Bellingham WA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Hatt Trick
Vessel Model: 45' Hatteras Convertible
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 985
Like Lou, I replumbed with Pex about four years ago. Very happy with the result. You will need to decide what type of fittings you want to use. I chose the Uponor system that expands the tubing ends and fittings are then inserted. The 'memory' of the tubing contracts over the fitting creating a very strong connection. Crimps and 'Sharkbite' fittings are also popular. There is a lot of pex information online and many video clips showing how to do it.
__________________
Ken on Hatt Trick
Ken E. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 08:47 PM   #4
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,265
I just used the white stuff and Sharkbite connectors. No leaks!
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 09:09 PM   #5
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,967
I'm all in favor of PEX, and my last couple of boats were built with it right from the factory.


The only suggestion I would have is to check the temp rating of the tubing and fittings. Typical domestic hot water is only 120-130F, and maybe up to 140F. But if you have hot water heated by your engine while underway, it will reach engine temp of 180-190F which is much hotter than typical. I have seen some of the quick connect fittings only rated to 150F, and know of people who have had failures with them.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 09:32 PM   #6
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dutch Barge Caroliner
Vessel Model: Selway-Fisher 45' Teign Luxe Motor
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,633
I can't comment on fittings as they have changed in the past 15 years since I did a few PEX upgrades. My idea here is to use what you feel comfortable installing and repairing. PEX doesn't like tight bends so plan for some 90 degree fittings. Chafe can be a problem so support is well. Don't make long runs over about four feet with straight tight runs. Give them gentle curves along the pipe length. This allows for expansion and contractions and prevents connections from being strained or pulled apart. If you have to go straight, put in an expansion/contraction loop.







Also consider curve braces. I forgot what these are called right off.


__________________
What a pain in the transom.

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 09:53 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Soo-Valley's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands
Country: canada
Vessel Name: Soo Valley
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 242
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
I'm all in favor of PEX, and my last couple of boats were built with it right from the factory.


The only suggestion I would have is to check the temp rating of the tubing and fittings. Typical domestic hot water is only 120-130F, and maybe up to 140F. But if you have hot water heated by your engine while underway, it will reach engine temp of 180-190F which is much hotter than typical. I have seen some of the quick connect fittings only rated to 150F, and know of people who have had failures with them.
Rated up to 200F, however also with a max pressure of 80 psi
pex.pdf
Soo-Valley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 10:02 PM   #8
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar
 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,410
Iím a big fan of Sea Tech fittings. They are very easy to use. You just cut the tube to length and shove it into the fitting. No special tool needed and they are easy to disassemble also. The fittings are reusable if you need to make changes.
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg 5D28559A-97AD-4189-A7B8-EEDC70D8537A.jpeg (95.4 KB, 231 views)
__________________
Parks Masterson
HopCar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 10:18 PM   #9
Guru
 
Datenight's Avatar
 
City: Noank, CT
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Datenight
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken E. View Post
Like Lou, I replumbed with Pex about four years ago. Very happy with the result. You will need to decide what type of fittings you want to use. I chose the Uponor system that expands the tubing ends and fittings are then inserted. The 'memory' of the tubing contracts over the fitting creating a very strong connection. Crimps and 'Sharkbite' fittings are also popular. There is a lot of pex information online and many video clips showing how to do it.
While not a boat I just did an entire house and in floor heating system with the Uponor method. One advantage is the the fittings are slightly larger for better flow. In actual use it probably does not matter although, the plastic expansion rings will never rust or corrode.

Rob
__________________
North Pacific 39
Datenight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 10:21 PM   #10
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,168
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
I'm all in favor of PEX, and my last couple of boats were built with it right from the factory.


The only suggestion I would have is to check the temp rating of the tubing and fittings. Typical domestic hot water is only 120-130F, and maybe up to 140F. But if you have hot water heated by your engine while underway, it will reach engine temp of 180-190F which is much hotter than typical. I have seen some of the quick connect fittings only rated to 150F, and know of people who have had failures with them.
Good advice. Iím considering PEX as well and hoping the mixing valve on our Isotemp hot water heater will help here. Iím using engine hose from the engine to the hot water tank and PEX to distribute the hot/cold mixed water throughout the boat, so the system (other than the tank) should never see 180 degrees.
angus99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2019, 10:24 PM   #11
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 5,978
I replumbed a previous boat with Sea Tek system. It was great, easy to use if you make square cuts. I also used some benders for turns instead of 90s. Used blue for cold and red for hot. One key issue is it comes in a box rolled up. It doesnít like to straighten out so sticking it into a cabinet and getting it out the other side can be challenging. I found out you can order it in 10í straight sticks so the rolled up trying to get it straightened out isnít an issue.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 12:12 AM   #12
Guru
 
City: Clearwater, FL
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Seas the Bay
Vessel Model: 1981 42' Hardin Europa
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 649
Never did a boat, but did a house. Great stuff. Sharkbites push-one wouldn't be my move, except an impossible to reach place. They are far more expensive that clamps and normal fittings. The crimper practically pays for itself.

I started with copper crimp rings and finished with the pinch type clamps. I had to get a different crimper, but they were easierbto crimp in tight spaces and I liked them better.

Good advice about supporting it, being careful of really tight bends, and using the occasional bend support to keep it neat. Not sure expansion loops will be needed on looser boat-length runs.
gkesden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 12:41 AM   #13
Guru
 
City: Anacortes
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 794
Love it with shark bite style fittings. Replumbed my galley sink last winter as I made the sink twice the original size. All the previous pex plumbing had to move. Figured it would be a pain. Hit up my spare parts bin, couple cuts later and in less than 30 minutes everything was moved, no trip to the hardware store.

One winter my galley froze, one of the sink fittings popped out. After the thaw I just pushed it back in, good as new.
ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 12:44 AM   #14
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,828
I plumbed my water lines for a new washer/dryer. I used blue for cold, red for hot. I also used shark bite connectors. Yes they are a bit expensive, but well worth it. All at Lowes.

Oh and if they freeze, they don't break...
Alaskan Sea-Duction is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 03:03 AM   #15
Guru
 
catalinajack's Avatar
 
City: Edgewater, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Catalina Jack
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 997
So what make of push-on fitting will transition from 1/2-inch O.D. copper tubing?
catalinajack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 04:34 AM   #16
Member
 
City: Davidson
Country: United States
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 9
Shark bite makes a 1/2" to 1/2" fitting that can accept copper or pex tube. Other brands make a similar push fitting.
Alternatively, you can sweat a copper fitting onto the copper that is designed for a pex line with crimp.
jtdums is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 05:08 AM   #17
Veteran Member
 
Voyager3's Avatar
 
City: Chesapeake
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Voyager 3
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen Manatee
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 34
I just replaced my 30 year old copper flare fittings with PEX. It was a pain but is so much easier to winterize and perform work on it. They don't leak. Have to get the right tools.
Voyager3 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 06:03 AM   #18
Guru
 
City: Canaveral
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,389
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost View Post
One winter my galley froze, one of the sink fittings popped out. After the thaw I just pushed it back in, good as new.
Has anyone here every tried installing a small air valve so you could blow out the water lines when winterizing?
makobuilders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 06:23 AM   #19
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,967
If you have a mixing valve at your hot water tank, then the downstream piping won't get so hot, assuming the mixing valve works correctly...I think there is a really good argument that any boat with engine heated water should have a mixing valve as a safety device.



Just looking at spec sheets, I would use the SeaTech series 35 or 45, but not the series 10 or 25, just given the temp rating.


Whale quick connect fittings are rated only to 150F, and these are the ones I have see (indirectly) fail.


SharkBite brass fittings look good with a 200F rating.


Sharkbite ProLock fittings are rated to 180F which is cutting it close.


So whatever system you plan to use, just take a few minutes to check the temp/pressure ratings.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 06:29 AM   #20
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by makobuilders View Post
Has anyone here every tried installing a small air valve so you could blow out the water lines when winterizing?

Yes. I usually just make up a fitting that connects an air hose to a hose spigot, and pressurize with air via the spigot. I've done this on numerous boats and houses with 100% success, at least so far.


On our new boat build I'm bringing all the outside water lines to separate manifolds (hot and cold) so they can be centrally shut off without shutting down the interior water, and the manifolds have air hose fittings so they can be blown out. It's easy to do when building, but probably impractical on an existing boat.
__________________

__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pex, plumbing

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×