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Old 05-13-2014, 12:49 AM   #1
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Replacing my AC unit

I am looking to replace my Rev. Cycle heat unit. It barely kept me warm over the winter and I think it has finally died and will not cool the cabin anymore. Had a tech look at it and it has been rigged so many different ways it is just time to replace it.I believe the unit to be original. It is a Marine Air C16H split system. I am contemplating going with one of the self contained units but have no experience with this stuff. Here is the unit I am considering to replace it with. Any thoughts?

Vector Compact 18,000 BTU/h - 115V/60Hz/1-Ph - Marineair


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Old 05-13-2014, 09:04 PM   #2
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We have 5 self contained units by Marine Airrr. we had to replace one due to something rusting out which was leaking freon into its raw water cooling system. Were happy with 'em so far, they keep the boat nice and chilly even on the hottest of days.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:00 AM   #3
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IF heat is as large a requirement , the Mitsubishi Mini Split might be the answer.

These are air nor water operated , so good by to holes in the hull and poking jellies out of the strainer at O dark 30.

They have a COP of 4 or 5 , so really make heat at low cost , down to -40F , not to +40F as most boat heat pumps .

Only thin tubing is required for the run from the outside unit ro the air handler inside.

These are Very! quiet inside.

Go modern , save money , be cool or warm as desired.

Ductless Air Conditioning | Mitsubishi Electric Product ...

www.mitsubishicomfort.com/en/consumer/product.../product-showcase
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Old 05-14-2014, 11:34 AM   #4
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IF heat is as large a requirement , the Mitsubishi Mini Split might be the answer.

These are air nor water operated , so good by to holes in the hull and poking jellies out of the strainer at O dark 30.

They have a COP of 4 or 5 , so really make heat at low cost , down to -40F , not to +40F as most boat heat pumps .

Only thin tubing is required for the run from the outside unit ro the air handler inside.

These are Very! quiet inside.

Go modern , save money , be cool or warm as desired.

Ductless Air Conditioning | Mitsubishi Electric Product ...

www.mitsubishicomfort.com/en/consumer/product.../product-showcase

What about corrosion? I could see the salt air getting to that fast. May work for a dock queen, but not a frequent cruiser.


I would stay with marine grade AC's. Just IMO.
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Old 05-14-2014, 02:21 PM   #5
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Litton,
Been there, done that. This link may help: Doing Your Own Air Conditioning

I have a couple of observations regarding the units in your pictures:

1. The squirrel-cage fans appear to be fixed in position. Models where the fan can be rotated from horizontal through to vertical offer more options when installing.

2. The drip-tray extends under the fan in the first pic - that's good because condensation landing outside the drip-tray is a real PITA.

3. There appear to be two fans on the unit in the lower pic, and the drip-tray doesn't extend under either of them. Regardless of one fan or two, a fan is blowing refrigerated air and will be prone to forming condensation on the outside. There may be some form of insulation, hard to tell, but in any event not much.

Let us know what you decide and how you get through.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:16 AM   #6
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What about corrosion? I could see the salt air getting to that fast. May work for a dock queen, but not a frequent cruiser.

Interesting question , I saw these all over Europe , including many waterfront locations , from Norway , Russia to South France.

Dometic is very adventurous and now makes a unit that looks like a std RV rooftop unit that is claimed to be marinized ., for simple boat installation.

Wont be long and they will best Mitsubishi , as so many folks require efficient heat as much as air cond.

They work with most RV assemblers and huge salt spray is common on RVs.

Probably better to mount a Mitsubishi out of the salt spray underway areas.
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Old 05-15-2014, 04:54 PM   #7
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Guys in our owners club who have eventually replaced Vector Compacts (what we have now) are all favoring the Vector Turbo units. (MarineAir, CruiseAir, I think all Dometic now...)

Not sure what the various differences might be -- except the newer Turbo units (and maybe the newest Compact units too, although it doesn't look like it in those pics?) have a composite drain pan for condensate. THAT seems to be a no-brainer improvement, maybe no more cleaning rust stains off the hull as condensation dribbles from the discharge outlet...

A dock neighbor -- new liveaboards -- recently replaced their older unit with a newer CruisAir installation, a Stowaway Turbo 16K-BTU (model STQ-16) and that installation also included an HMDL auxiliary (resistance) 2kw heat module (model #HMDL-2) in between blower and ducting. I think they had to choose that particular Stowaway due to space constraints. We didn't have a great winter, not a good winter to begin their liveaboard status, but they said it got 'em through reasonably well.

That said, our MarineAir Vector Compact units are from 2002, seem to work fine, we get heat, we get cold, all good. I'm told newer units also have an option for a sound shield, and I might consider that option in the future... but we don't find the self-contained units overly loud in our installation anyway.

It's useful to flush the water lines periodically. HOW periodically depends on where you are and what your favorite marine growth might be. Not difficult.

I can describe what happens when the discharge hose slips off the nipple/port on the back of the unit... and I don't suss out the problem quickly enough... <sigh>...

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Old 05-15-2014, 10:26 PM   #8
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The newr units now have the soft start option, this virtually eliminates the high current kick and bang when the compressor kicks on, the Vector turbo also sports a new higher volume higher CFM blower and it's quieter. The drip pan is composite, it's about time. Also the compressor is mounted on soft rubber shock and vibration absorption. All in all they are a vast improvement over even the circa 2008-09 models. They draw less surge current, move more air, don't rust and are quiet. What's not to like other than perhaps the cost?
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Old 05-16-2014, 06:13 AM   #9
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What's not to like other than perhaps the cost?
Bill

Using a toaster wire for heat in the winter can get really expensive!
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:06 AM   #10
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What's not to like other than perhaps the cost?
Bill

Using a toaster wire for heat in the winter can get really expensive!

Sure, but in a relatively small boat (the one I mentioned is 34') with good "people space" (i.e., space for systems and access gets a bit crammed)... and in an area where winters aren't usually too long/bad... it seems to be workable, at least in their case.

Bigger boat, longer/colder winter... other options, of course.

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Old 05-16-2014, 08:10 AM   #11
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Sure, but in a relatively small boat (the one I mentioned is 34') with good "people space" (i.e., space for systems and access gets a bit crammed)... and in an area where winters aren't usually too long/bad... it seems to be workable, at least in their case.

Bigger boat, longer/colder winter... other options, of course.

-Chris
Thanks for helping me articulate my thoughts, Chris.
Sure electronic heat won't work for a boat doing the inside passage however it may very well be enough for the Mid Atlantic area or points further south.
Bill
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