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Old 09-20-2011, 09:25 PM   #21
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RE: Pros and cons of a diesel cook stove?

Well, coming back on topic, if I lived and boated in a region which gets cold enough to need boat space heating, you couldn't do better than to set up one of those diesel furnaces which heat the domestic water, in addition to the engine heat exchanger, as well as circulating heated water in a sort of closed circuit radiator set-up. The latter can easily be tuned off in warmer weather. This set-up worked a treat in the canal boat we hired in the UK, as mentioned. However, I doubt I would want to use diesel to cook with - propane better there in my view - with sensible precautions re installation of course. That is definitely a system you would get professionally installed. You need to to get the gas certificate which I think all countries require...?
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Old 09-21-2011, 04:11 AM   #22
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RE: Pros and cons of a diesel cook stove?

you couldn't do better than to set up one of those diesel furnaces which heat the domestic water, in addition to the engine heat exchanger, as well as circulating heated water in a sort of closed circuit radiator set-up.

Yes but ,,, some units are supplied with a copper heating coil some with SS.

The copper does not like to be empty when the fire is on.
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Old 09-22-2011, 04:44 AM   #23
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Pros and cons of a diesel cook stove?

"But I am interested in the on demand water heating systems ?"


The problem with the on demand setups is turning on and off the water in the shower turns the unit off and on.

Maintaining a constant temperature is very hard, if you try to save water.

My "solution" is to install a home tub / shower style controll head.

Turn from Shower to tub (the tub position being set to return the water to the FW tank).

Constant temp , at the cost of a bit of propane.

Have fun!


-- Edited by FF on Thursday 22nd of September 2011 04:45:40 AM
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:23 PM   #24
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So I am seriously considering ditching the propane and going with a Wallas or Dickinson. Are there any other players in the diesel stove market? I'd be interested in hearing more actual experiences with either of these (or similar) products.

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Old 05-07-2013, 03:07 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by dhmeissner View Post
So I am seriously considering ditching the propane and going with a Wallas or Dickinson. Are there any other players in the diesel stove market? I'd be interested in hearing more actual experiences with either of these (or similar) products.

Cheers

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I have first hand experience with the wallas cook top.

I found it to be a great alternative to the alchohol stove it replaced. It is nice in that it doubles as a heater for cool weather use.

Very reliable, and quiet. The only draw back if it is one that it takes a few minutes to start up.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:53 AM   #26
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We have and use our Pacific Dickinson diesel stove in the cooler seasons. Cooking needs to be adapted as the stove as a heater is sometimes a bit too cool to cook quickly or be able to deal with some things. In outright winter it is hot enough to do a good job. It's just the shoulder seasons where we don't run the stove really hot that it burns a bit on the cool side for cooking. If you are willing to adapt it will work though. Stews or similar in the oven are great.
We keep a kettle on top always and once boiling just move it off to one side on a trivet so it stays hot but no longer boiling yet quickly ready.

Temperature changes are NOT done quickly. The stove burner has a lot of metal to heat or allow to cool so you cannot use it like your home based stove.
If you want shower hot water depending upon the boat configuration you can use the hot water coil. We can't\don't as our h.w. tank is well below the stove and we never decided it was important enough to rig a pump.

We use a single burner Origo alcohol stove for the times in hot weather along with the barbeque for cooking.

The best setup , to me, would be a diesel heater [not a furnace], not necessarily the stove, with a propane cooking stove. That way you have the benefits of both. I know a few people who have exactly that and it works well for them.

Of course that means another fuel but they worked it out and it;s not a problem.

Would I get rid of my stove. NO! I almost did a long time ago untill I realized what it would take to replace it and came to my senses. I figured out how to make it reliable, helped by Dickinson. The problem wasn't the stoves fault but rather a poor installation.

Just a side note. If your diesel stove is sooting the upper deck you are not running it correctly or haven't got it setup properly. I went through that and also learned the fan needs to be run all the time on low.

With all heating and cooking systems there will be compromises. Battery power, fuels, convenience, mtce., repairs and breakdowns.

My wife and I like our Dickinson but it is not fool proof. It is however dead reliable and keeps the main living area warm. The v-berth though is cold as the heat doesn't go down. A friend with a Dickinson heater, not stove, used a small muffin fan to collect heat from the exhaust stack and blow it into the v berth. The heater was close enough to work and although not warm it's not cold either in the shoulder seasons..
Enough blather. good night.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:12 PM   #27
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Thanks Kevin and C for your experiences. I will look closely at the options out there.

-d

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