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Old 05-13-2013, 12:46 PM   #21
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Steve, I have a Cummins 210 hp engine as well. It has a Sherwood 1-1/4 rubber impeller pump. I don't have the figures for the Sherwood but a similar 1" Jabsco is rated at 23GPM (1380 GPH).

If you feel that isn't worth doing consider driving a bigger pump off the engine with a belt. Take a look at the Jabsco 51270-9013. It is a 2" pump that moves 4100 gph @ 10 feet of head @1500 RPM.

I've had this discussion with sail boaters and most of them use 3/4" pumps that pump about 500 GPH. They don't feel that is worth the effort.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:05 PM   #22
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After reading insurance stats I decided to take a 110vac 1 1/2" float activated pump off the shelf of my shop and install in my boat this summer. Won't be very handy away from the dock without an inverter but insurance stats indicate sinking at the dock is more likely.

Belt driven or PTO pump off the engine would be a nice feature for underway.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:12 PM   #23
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HopCar-many years ago, we had a similar experience with the USCG. We were bringing a 65' Trumpy from Mystic, ultimately down to SC. The first leg was Mystic to NYC. Once out of the Mystic River and into LI Sound, we sprung a garboard plank and the water got up to the engines, over the oil pan. We called the USCG and they showed up in a hurry in a 41 footer with 3 gas pumps. Those 3 pumps could not lower the water level, so they helicoptered 2 more, one of which would not start-but once the 4th got going, we got ahead of the water and managed to get the boat to a yard in Conn and get it lifted. Never thought I would want to kiss a guy in an orange thermal suit (it was December), but I just about kissed the first guy over the rail! The funniest part, once we knew we weren't going to sink, was that one poor Coastie spent the entire process seasick as a dog, leaning over the rail! He was so apologetic and embarrassed!

That was 22 years ago and I have not thought about having a gas pump on board since, but after this discussion, I may think about it.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:51 PM   #24
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Please think very carefully with regards to using the main engines COOLING pump for dewatering.

A dewatering pump off the engine on an electric clutch can be a life saver and also be used as a back up raw water pump for the main. Along with fire fighting. Choices.

Two 6 gal pails and a couple of motivated guys on a sinking boat will move tons of water. Bin there done that.
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Old 05-13-2013, 04:48 PM   #25
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OFB, you're right. The cooling pumps are a last resort for when the other pumps aren't doing it. It shouldn't be a problem if you keep track of your engine temp and keep an eye in the bilge. Of course you'll be watching the bilge!

My thought is that with a good strum box on the intake and going through the sea strainer you're not likely to have a problem. If the boat is going to sink, you might as well risk some damage to the engine to try to save it.

"...also be used as a back up raw water pump for the main."
I hadn't thought of that but I like it.

Craig, In my ill spent youth a friend got a summer job keeping a houseboat afloat. It was equipped with several 110 volt sump pumps because it leaked like a seive.

We would come down to the boat several times a week to find pencil size streams of water squirting into the "basement". I would stick a stiff wire out through the hole so my friend could find it. He would mix up a stiff batch of cement that would stick and set under water. Then he would dive down, find the wire, shove the wire back into the boat, scrape off the growth, and slap the cement into the hole.

We kept the houseboat afloat for several months that way.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:18 AM   #26
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"After reading insurance stats I decided to take a 110vac 1 1/2" float activated pump off the shelf of my shop and install in my boat this summer. Won't be very handy away from the dock without an inverter but insurance stats indicate sinking at the dock is more likely."

Depending on the pump/motor construction an isolation transformer might be required .
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:45 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"After reading insurance stats I decided to take a 110vac 1 1/2" float activated pump off the shelf of my shop and install in my boat this summer. Won't be very handy away from the dock without an inverter but insurance stats indicate sinking at the dock is more likely."

Depending on the pump/motor construction an isolation transformer might be required .
Interesting. These pumps are submersible and rated for use on non GFCI protected outlets safely.

What am I missing?
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:46 AM   #28
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Butt pucker moments.

Yup dockside issues when folk have left the scene.

I look over at a neighbors boat early in the morn. Don't look right. HMMMMM

Where is the boot line it looks way too clean. HMMMMMMMM sip coffee. No boot line hmmmm.


^&*&% she is sinking.

I jump into action, run around the dock with "manual pump " and fixins.

Break the lock on the hatch and proceed down into the cabin that's full of water with pick up hose in hand.

Bam ! warm FUZZY feeling , Butt puckers as my foot goes into water.

Should have pulled the dock power cord before boarding said boat. I backed out unplugged boat and had it dewatered before owner arrived.

I have two 110 V sump pumps I use all the time. But be careful with there use , how they be plugged in etc etc.
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