Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-27-2015, 10:16 PM   #21
Guru
 
HeadMistress's Avatar


 
City: AR
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,192
Quote:
Originally Posted by islandgypsy View Post
I have a 1982 32' Island Gypsy Sedan with an electric LectraSan system. I seem to have some odor in the head and not sure how to get rid of it. Are there any deodorizers I might be able to add to rid the head of the odor? Perhaps I should double check if there might be sewage in the holding tank? It's an old boat and I don't know if anyone pumped any waste into the holding tank. Any ideas? Thanks, Rick
Unless your holding tank is in the head, it's not likely to be the source of odor in the head. When odor IS odor is confined to the head, the source is almost always either the shower sump (a sump in need of cleaning is full of soap scum, body oils, dirty bath water etc that can make the head smell like a swamp or even a sewer), or--if the toilet uses raw water--the head intake. Sea water left to sit between visits to the boat can stagnate and stink...animal or vegetable micro and not-so-micro sea life can be pulled into the intake line, or even into the channel in the rim of the bowl, where it can die decay and stink.

So first thing I'd do is clean the shower sump. If that doesn't cure the problem, close the intake seacock, remove the head intak hose from the thru-hull and stick it into a bucket of clean FRESH water to which you've added a quart of distilled white vinegar (NOT cider!)...flush the whole bucket through the system. Continue adding water to the head using a cup (if the toilet is an electric toilet that has an intake impeller, refill the bucket as needed instead) for a few days.

The only other likely sources for odor that's confined to the head are any y-valve installed in the head that may be leaking...or MAYBE a joker valves that's so worn out that it's allowing gasses from inside the discharge hose (a reason why you should always rinse out the hose with a bowl full of water once a day) to escape back into the bowl.

If it's none of the above, send me a PM and we'll get together one-on-one to find it.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
2017 Peggie Hall
Specializing in marine sanitation since '87.
Author "The NEW Get Rid of Boat Odors"
HeadMistress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2015, 10:22 PM   #22
Guru
 
HeadMistress's Avatar


 
City: AR
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,192
Quote:
Originally Posted by On The Rocks View Post
Would like to have a tank in the bilge but the space is irregular (keel) shaped so hard to measure.
Check Ronco Plastics (no relation to Ron Popeil and his Pocket Fisherman etc)...they make TOP quality rotomolded water and waste tanks for a very reasonable price and have more than 400 shapes and sizes, over 100 of which are non-rectangular...and they install fittings in the sizes and locations specified by the customer when they make the tank. Ronco Plastics Marine Catalog
__________________

__________________
2017 Peggie Hall
Specializing in marine sanitation since '87.
Author "The NEW Get Rid of Boat Odors"
HeadMistress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2015, 11:03 PM   #23
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
CAUTION!!! muriatic acid... mentioned above is a strong corrosive to metals. It can eat them alive while the metal is immersed! For most rubbers/plastic it does not react corrosively. Just be careful.
There is no metal in a porcelain toilet bowl.
Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2015, 11:28 PM   #24
Guru
 
HeadMistress's Avatar


 
City: AR
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
CAUTION!!! muriatic acid... mentioned above is a strong corrosive to metals. It can eat them alive while the metal is immersed! For most rubbers/plastic it does not react corrosively. Just be careful.
Full strength maybe...but yards have been using muriatic acid to dissolve mineral buildup in hoses (not just sewage hoses) for decades...and also for decades Raritan's instructions for cleaning the electrode pack (which is definitely metal) in the LectraSan and ElectroScan called for a 12% solution of muriatic acid...until they began private labelling "Sew Clean" under their own brand name "C.H. Cleans Hoses" just a couple of years ago.
__________________
2017 Peggie Hall
Specializing in marine sanitation since '87.
Author "The NEW Get Rid of Boat Odors"
HeadMistress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 02:26 AM   #25
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadMistress View Post
Full strength maybe...but yards have been using muriatic acid to dissolve mineral buildup in hoses (not just sewage hoses) for decades...and also for decades Raritan's instructions for cleaning the electrode pack (which is definitely metal) in the LectraSan and ElectroScan called for a 12% solution of muriatic acid...until they began private labelling "Sew Clean" under their own brand name "C.H. Cleans Hoses" just a couple of years ago.
Respectfully I say: I'd like to see the electrode-pack metal after more than once for a very short time in a 12% muriatic acid mixture. Under different conditions and for numerous reasons I've for decades worked with various dilutions of muriatic acid. When muriatic acid contacts metal it begins to corrode metal.
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 04:14 AM   #26
Guru
 
LarryM's Avatar
 
City: League City, TX
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pelago
Vessel Model: Wellcraft 3300 Coastal
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
Respectfully I say: I'd like to see the electrode-pack metal after more than once for a very short time in a 12% muriatic acid mixture. Under different conditions and for numerous reasons I've for decades worked with various dilutions of muriatic acid. When muriatic acid contacts metal it begins to corrode metal.
This is straight from my Raritan LectraSan Owner's Manual:

Treatment/Electrode cleaning

Note: Cleaning is recommended every two years with
recreational use or if amber light is always on during
treatment cycle.

1. Activate the LST/MC and flush toilet several times,
allowing all waste to be treated.
2. Turn off water supply and flush toilet as dry as possible.
NOTE: Check toilet manufacturer's instructions to ensure
no damage is done to any components.
3. Turn off power and disconnect wires to LST/MC.
WARNING: LST/MC must not be activated while muriatic
acid solution is in the system.
4. In plastic bucket combine 1.5 pints (.852 liters) of muriatic
acid with 3 gallons (13.635 liters) of fresh water.
WARNING: Add acid to the water, DO NOT place acid in
the container first.
5. Carefully pour solution into the toilet and flush until bowl
is as dry as possible.
6. Pour one gallon (3.8 liters) of additional fresh water into
bowl to dilute any acid remaining.
7. Allow to stand for a minimum of 45 minutes.
8. Turn on water supply and flush a minimum of 10 gallons
(38.0 liters) of water to dilute and discharge muriatic acid
solution.
9. Reconnect wires and restore power to LST/MC.

The above specifies a 6% solution, for 45 minutes. Whatever the electrodes are made of, it is apparently pretty non-corrosive in that concentration of muriatic acid.
__________________
Larry
M/V Pelago
LarryM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 07:38 AM   #27
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,537
For difficult placements Vetus and others sell 35G flexible tanks , with fittings you install for the best operation.

After 2 or so decades they get stiff , but still work, and don't stink out..

Best if rested in rug or carpet so motion underway , or from filling does not cause chafe.

Simple but Pri$y.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 09:49 AM   #28
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryM View Post
This is straight from my Raritan LectraSan Owner's Manual:

Treatment/Electrode cleaning

Note: Cleaning is recommended every two years with
recreational use or if amber light is always on during
treatment cycle.

1. Activate the LST/MC and flush toilet several times,
allowing all waste to be treated.
2. Turn off water supply and flush toilet as dry as possible.
NOTE: Check toilet manufacturer's instructions to ensure
no damage is done to any components.
3. Turn off power and disconnect wires to LST/MC.
WARNING: LST/MC must not be activated while muriatic
acid solution is in the system.
4. In plastic bucket combine 1.5 pints (.852 liters) of muriatic
acid with 3 gallons (13.635 liters) of fresh water.
WARNING: Add acid to the water, DO NOT place acid in
the container first.
5. Carefully pour solution into the toilet and flush until bowl
is as dry as possible.
6. Pour one gallon (3.8 liters) of additional fresh water into
bowl to dilute any acid remaining.
7. Allow to stand for a minimum of 45 minutes.
8. Turn on water supply and flush a minimum of 10 gallons
(38.0 liters) of water to dilute and discharge muriatic acid
solution.
9. Reconnect wires and restore power to LST/MC.

The above specifies a 6% solution, for 45 minutes. Whatever the electrodes are made of, it is apparently pretty non-corrosive in that concentration of muriatic acid.
Larry - Apparently is the operative phrase that bothers me.

Maybe the electrode material composition does have ample components to not be too badly affected by 6% muriatic acid solution for 45 minutes. Also, maybe when done in the suggested 2 year periods this process accomplishes the required cleaning off surfaces of electrodes but is another reason why electrodes wear for eventual service/replacement. Seems that the muriatic acid to clean the electrodes must be causing the electrode's surface to "shed" molecules via corrosive action and therefore "drop" the built-up coatings off electrode surfaces. Muriatic acid, in and of itself, is corrosive to many metals... just that simple.


Some metals seem not affected.

Watch VERY Closely:


"muriatic means "pertaining to brine or salt", and thence muriate means hydrochloride
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 11:11 AM   #29
Guru
 
LarryM's Avatar
 
City: League City, TX
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pelago
Vessel Model: Wellcraft 3300 Coastal
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 843
Art,

A number of years ago, I called Raritan about the electrodes. I was told they were "titanium plates coated with a rare earth element."

In the manual "Titanium - Corrosion by Acids" by Timnet, a material manufacturer in Colorado, they state:

"Hydrochloric Acid - Iso-corrosion data illustrate that grade 2 offers useful corrosion resistance to about 7% hydrochloric acid at room temperature; grade 12 to about 9% HCl; and grade 7 to about 27%."

They go on to say:

"Severe corrosion damage on titanium equipment has resulted from cleaning procedures utilizing pure hydrochloric acid or acid inhibited with amines."

So, even though the electrodes are made of titanium, you are absolutely correct about how corrosive hydrochloric acid is when in contact with them. In this case however, titanium "offers useful corrosion resistance to about 7% hydrochloric acid at room temperature" whatever that means. And, I have no clue as to what 'grade' they are or what the 'rare earth element' might be.

Long ago in the Naval Aviation community, we used to refer to things like this as being "made of Unobtainium" and they worked by the process of "FM (f**king magic)"
__________________
Larry
M/V Pelago
LarryM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 11:25 AM   #30
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryM View Post
Art,

A number of years ago, I called Raritan about the electrodes. I was told they were "titanium plates coated with a rare earth element."

In the manual "Titanium - Corrosion by Acids" by Timnet, a material manufacturer in Colorado, they state:

"Hydrochloric Acid - Iso-corrosion data illustrate that grade 2 offers useful corrosion resistance to about 7% hydrochloric acid at room temperature; grade 12 to about 9% HCl; and grade 7 to about 27%."

They go on to say:

"Severe corrosion damage on titanium equipment has resulted from cleaning procedures utilizing pure hydrochloric acid or acid inhibited with amines."

So, even though the electrodes are made of titanium, you are absolutely correct about how corrosive hydrochloric acid is when in contact with them. In this case however, titanium "offers useful corrosion resistance to about 7% hydrochloric acid at room temperature" whatever that means. And, I have no clue as to what 'grade' they are or what the 'rare earth element' might be.

Long ago in the Naval Aviation community, we used to refer to things like this as being "made of Unobtainium" and they worked by the process of "FM (f**king magic)"
they worked by the process of "FM (f**king magic)"
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 02:51 PM   #31
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
My electro scan manual says every 6 months or when the warning light is on too much.

No warning about too many cleanings.

I have done back to back cleanings as recommended by the factory with no ill effects.

Acid and metal have issues but one sweeping generalization does not fit all.

The cleaning solution got on the handle of the bucket and it still functions today.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2015, 09:33 PM   #32
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
My electro scan manual says every 6 months or when the warning light is on too much.

No warning about too many cleanings.

I have done back to back cleanings as recommended by the factory with no ill effects.

Acid and metal have issues but one sweeping generalization does not fit all.

The cleaning solution got on the handle of the bucket and it still functions today.
__________________

Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012