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Old 05-04-2013, 01:18 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jeffnick View Post
Isn't the location of the Y-valve that needs to be locked between the head and holding tank-or-overboard? If your head goes directly into the holding tank with no other option, aren't you in compliance?
Yes and yes.
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:32 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnick View Post
Isn't the location of the Y-valve that needs to be locked between the head and holding tank-or-overboard? If your head goes directly into the holding tank with no other option, aren't you in compliance?
That's a point of contention, and the rules are open to some interpretation. But in the end, what's written is irrelevant. The law IS what the lawmen DO.

They've all been taught to look for a Y valve and make sure it's locked. This dates from the old days when there was always a Y valve that sent the waste overboard one way, and into the tank the other.

To make the boarding officers happy, you'd do well to lock the through-hull valve shut with a wire tie or padlock, or install a key switch (and not leave the key in it!) Other options are the 2 hidden switches that my Bayliner has, or some of the other creative suggestions posted here. Just remember that you may still meet a think-headed boarding officer who was trained to look for Y valves and won't listen to reason.
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:17 PM   #23
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Ron, my gut feeling is that the duckbill valves wouldn't invert but you could put a check valve in the line between the tank and the pump just to be sure.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:17 AM   #24
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No more odor comes from a larger vent area than the usually tiny vent (usually a fuel vent fitting) as on most boats.

The joys of preferring to anchor out rather than running from marina to marina is few get to fool with putting stuff in an open waste fitting.

When unused the boat is at home dock, or anchored out at a mooring.

A thief coming aboard will probably have the VHF in mind rather than vent stuffing.
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:41 AM   #25
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You normally find out a macerator pump has tossed the flaps off the impeller and needs a rebuild when the tank is full and you need to empty it. A valve between the tank and pump makes a clean set-up. (pun intended)
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Old 05-05-2013, 11:15 AM   #26
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My boat doesn't have a Y valve. have two separate pck up tubes, one goes to the macerator and the other goes to the deck pumpout. Ths causes no end to consternation to the folks nspectng the boat. To pump overboard, you have to open a thru hull valve, turn a breaker on and turn a keyed power swtch on. Ths usually satsfes them. (Sorry, no aye key today). Here are the rules straight from the CFR:

(b) When operating a vessel on a body of water where the discharge
of treated or untreated sewage is prohibited by the Environmental
Protection Agency under 40 CFR 140.3 or 140.4, the operator must secure
each Type I or Type II device in a manner which prevents discharge of
treated or untreated sewage. Acceptable methods of securing the device
include--
(1) Closing the seacock and removing the handle;
(2) Padlocking the seacock in the closed position;
(3) Using a non-releasable wire-tie to hold the seacock in the
closed position; or
(4) Locking the door to the space enclosing the toilets with a
padlock or door handle key lock.
(c) When operating a vessel on a body of water where the discharge
of untreated sewage is prohibited by the Environmental Protection Agency
under 40 CFR 140.3, the operator must secure each Type III device in a
manner which prevents discharge of sewage. Acceptable methods of
securing the device include--
(1) Closing each valve leading to an overboard discharge and
removing the handle;
(2) Padlocking each valve leading to an overboard discharge in the
closed position; or
(3) Using a non-releasable wire-tie to hold each valve leading to an
overboard discharge in the closed position.

[CGH 95-028, 62 FR 51194, Sept. 30, 1997]
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:14 PM   #27
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...wonder if inspectors would be OK with leaving the key on a hook beside the door lock....
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:58 PM   #28
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Note the turn of phrase "Acceptable methods of securing the device
include..."

In other words, this is not intended to be an exhaustive list of acceptable methods, only examples. Still, picking from the list will save you some time with a well-trained boarding officer.
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Old 05-05-2013, 02:56 PM   #29
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Hopcar Wrote:
"Let me know how it works out. I think I'd try it without the check valve first. I'm a little worried that the check valve could foul. You might want to use an oversize valve."

This is something I've been thinking about for awhile. If I do it, it wouldn't be until next fall or winter. I'm thinking of asking Sealand what they thought of their macerator pump surviving the pump out but I'm pretty sure they would CYA any answer.

I was going to see if there is a check valve designed for this application - maybe Sealand has one. I don't think I would have a solids problem as my boat has Tecma heads and they macerate on the flush.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:29 PM   #30
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The American Tug comes with a macerator and a key switch at the helm. I've been inspected by the CG in Lake MI, and twice in FL. I explained the system and said that only the Captain has a key, and it was approved both times.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:20 AM   #31
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Our boat was built when anything went. So each toilet can discharge directly overboard or to its own holding tank. Each holding tank can be pumped directly overboard via a macerator pump or pumped out by a shoreside facility. Where the toilets and holding tanks discharge is determined by Y-valves.

Every owner of the boat has elected to keep it that way, as have we. While we normally discharge the toilets into their holding tanks and pump the holding tanks out with shoreside facilities (except in BC) we like the fact that we have work-arounds in the event of a holding tank, pump, or plumbing line function failure.

We have no locks on our toilet or holding tank overboard discharge seacocks or the Y-valves. We've been boarded a few times by the USCG and they went through the whole boat each time.. They didn't care about the waste handling systems at all and made no comments on them or the valve positions.

So if the OP's boat was ours we would elect to keep the Y-valve in place and exercise it regularly to make sure if it was needed someday it would work.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:30 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by windmist View Post
I was going to see if there is a check valve designed for this application - maybe Sealand has one. I don't think I would have a solids problem as my boat has Tecma heads and they macerate on the flush.
When the question of check valves in sewage lines has come up in the past Peggie Hall would always chine in with what a bad idea this is. IIRC, her explanation was that no check valve on the planet will survive functionally with sewage discharge going through it even if it's just liquid. The buildup that occurs in these lines will render the valve inop in a very short time and it could end up actually blocking or restricting the line in both directions.

Even very simple duckbill valves need replacing periodically for this very reason.
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