Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-09-2015, 08:04 AM   #21
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
Most fun I have seen is the setup day fishing boats in City Island NY use.

The keel cooler is bypassed and the rail becomes heated so the fishermen can warm their hands .

Free heat indeed!
__________________
Advertisement

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2015, 12:30 PM   #22
Member
 
Grinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 8
Thanks for the photos, very helpful. Now if I can only figure out how to connect a diverter valve that will send the coolant directly back to the engine when the hot water heater gets to temp!
__________________

Grinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2015, 12:42 PM   #23
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinder View Post
Now if I can only figure out how to connect a diverter valve that will send the coolant directly back to the engine when the hot water heater gets to temp!
Good idea is to put valves on the hoses at their connection points on the engine just in case one of the hoses between the engine and the water heater blows out while you are underway. It has happened to me and I'm sure to others.

Have never felt the need to cut the hot engine coolant off from the heater once the water heater is up to temp, but such valves should do the trick. May be a pain to get to them to close them depending on your access.
__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2015, 01:23 PM   #24
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinder View Post
Thanks for the photos, very helpful. Now if I can only figure out how to connect a diverter valve that will send the coolant directly back to the engine when the hot water heater gets to temp!
Most HWH I have seen already have this valve installed on theHWH its self...
__________________
1988 M/Y Camargue Yacht Fisher
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/
Alaskan Sea-Duction is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2015, 04:09 PM   #25
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction View Post
Most HWH I have seen already have this valve installed on theHWH its self...
I haven't seen this, is this something new (in the past 4-5 years?). Sounds like a good solution. The mixing valve is also a good idea.

We just learned to live with super-hot water. We do the mixing at the sink or shower faucet, and like BayView said above, I assume that starting out at a higher temperature makes the water stay hot longer.

I love having "free" hot water at the end of (and during) every run. I'd never own a boat without it. To me, it's well worth the risk. I did have the hose between the engine and water heater let go on my last boat (a hanger failed and it was chafing on the steering arm.) I knew pretty quickly and was able to make the repair, refill the cooling system and be on my way. A very small price to pay for all the hundreds of hot showers and clean dishes we've enjoyed over the years.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 10:21 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
jeffnick's Avatar
 
City: Spartanburg, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Big Duck
Vessel Model: '72 Land-N-Sea
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 425
For those of us with raw water cooling it's quite simple and never gets above 140℉.
One More Time Around: Engine Heat for Hot Water
jeffnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 11:35 AM   #27
Member
 
Grinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 8
Thanks, but I feel I definitely need a way to control the hot water going to the heater, the first attempt resulted in the pressure/temp relief valve opening and turning the engine room into a sauna and filling the bilge with hot water. I'm also not excited about 180 degree water running through the hot water system with the possibility of burns even with a mixer valve. I'd like to send the coolant back to the engine with a diverter valve once the hot water tank reached a more comfortable temp like 125.
Grinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 08:07 AM   #28
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
The Anti scald valve will shut OFF the hot water if it can not control the temperature.
A tempering valve will not.

Perhaps you could install one in the feed to the HW heater , but most folks would prefer the hotter water in the system as it stores longer.

The anti scald valve could be installed in the FW as it leaves the heater , but far more water would be wasted , waiting for the water to get hot at the tap or shower.

Fine Home Building has an article this month on the heated water ,14,000 gallons wasted in the average dirt house in a year and its energy cost in lost heat.

House solution is elegant and changes a $500+ annual waste bill into $5.00 charge, but its not suitable for a boat , unless dockside.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 11:30 AM   #29
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,096
I just installed a couple valves on on the lines going to the heater as well as a bypass line between the two with a third valve. By partially opening the bypass valve, I could control the amount of heat going to the H/W tank. It also allowed me to isolate the lines to the tank if there ever was a leak.
It was all manual adjustment but it worked fine for me.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 01:07 PM   #30
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,151
This what I found on WM

From Isotherm:

Product Description

Designed specifically for marine use, the innovative design of these water heaters represents a welcome departure from traditional upright cylinders and box-like designs of the past. Inner and outer tanks are made of 316 stainless steel, NOT corrosion-prone aluminum. These heaters may be mounted vertically or horizontally and are secured by adjustable stainless steel mounting feet.
Engine water heat exchanger coils are extra long for faster heating and AC heating elements are nickel-coated copper for long life. All models feature polyurethane foam insulation for extra heat retention and incorporate service thermostats set to 160°F. Thermostatically controlled mixing valves prevent scalding, and ensure that water reaches the tap at the temperature you wish. Additional sizes and options available by special order.
  • Material: Storage tank and connections: 316 stainless steel; electric heating coil: nickel-plated copper; cover and mounting feet: 304 stainless steel
  • Port Sizes: All plumbing fittings are 1/2" NPT, including freshwater and heat exchanger inlets and outlets
  • Draw: 6.8A @ 120V AC
  • Warranty: One year on labor; two years parts; five-year limited on inner tank
From Kuuma:

With the same ignition-protected design and features as the West Marine water heaters described above, Kuuma water heaters are installed as original equipment on many boats, including Sea Ray, Four Winns, Hunter, Beneteau, and Boston Whaler. Like West Marine water heaters, Kuuma water heaters are protected by a high-temperature limiter with automatic reset. Use of a magnesium anode is recommended to extend tank life.
  • Port Sizes: Cold/hot in/out: 1/2" NPT, Engine coolant in/out: 5/8" (for hose)
  • Draw: 12.5A @ 120V AC; 6.25A @ 240V AC
  • Approvals: ETL
  • Warranty: One year against manufacturer defects
__________________
1988 M/Y Camargue Yacht Fisher
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/
Alaskan Sea-Duction is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 06:33 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
On The Rocks's Avatar
 
City: Palm Springs CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: On The Rocks
Vessel Model: Gulf Star MKII
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 109
mine has heat exchangers for the hydronic heating system that the engines and hot water heater are connected to. The engines are pre-heated by the hydronic heater and they provide heat to the hydronic system when running.

I need to replace the heater hoses that run from the heat exchanger to the hot water heater. My question is should I sue silicone or rubber hose?
On The Rocks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 10:36 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
jeffnick's Avatar
 
City: Spartanburg, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Big Duck
Vessel Model: '72 Land-N-Sea
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 425
In case there are any bottom feeders here (like me), the discussion on another board relative to this topic, is the best way to get the most out of a Sun Shower rather than the technology in achieving the optimum temperature of an engine heating water system.
Amazon.com : Stearns SunShower 5.0 with 4-5 showers (Capacity- 5 gallons) : Portable Camping Shower Gear : Sports & Outdoors
For some cruisers, a Sun Shower is all it takes.

My wife and I used a Sun Shower (w/ homemade raincatcher) for the three years we lived aboard a pre-trawler 27' sailboat...using the small sailboat for much the same purpose as the big trawler cruiser guys do here...just to be out experiencing the wonders of the water.

This group was the focus of much of my (lurking) trawler research. While the group is inspiring, it is very intimidating with talk of ‘quality’ vessels and ‘must have’ technology. This led me to a trawler purchase which was perhaps the low point of my boating experiences.

Probably 99% of those here can appreciate that the trawler ultimately didn’t cost me a penny. I put her into charter service and the folks who took her out were absolutely great (and easy on the boat). But unlike our previous boats, a slipped trawler requires considerable responsibility. Responsibility that I just wasn’t up for.

So the trawler had to go, but the draw of the sea didn’t subside. I found ways to keep the watery fire alive because I just couldn’t let go. That was/is my journey and my joy is to encourage others to keep the fire alive in spite of ‘quality’ and ‘technology’.

I chose to ‘infest’ my philosophies here because I’m thinking there are dreamers lurking like I did, who simply can’t afford to do it like the big guys. Perhaps I can give the dreamers a little low-tech inspiration. However, if there’s no one reading that finds my diatribes useful, fine, I’ll quit wasting bandwidth here, but if there are 5 positive replies to this post I’ll keep my bottom feeder cruiser ‘discoveries’ coming.
jeffnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2015, 04:46 AM   #33
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,313
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
I haven't seen this, is this something new (in the past 4-5 years?). Sounds like a good solution. The mixing valve is also a good idea.

We just learned to live with super-hot water. We do the mixing at the sink or shower faucet, and like BayView said above, I assume that starting out at a higher temperature makes the water stay hot longer.

I love having "free" hot water at the end of (and during) every run. I'd never own a boat without it. To me, it's well worth the risk. I did have the hose between the engine and water heater let go on my last boat (a hanger failed and it was chafing on the steering arm.) I knew pretty quickly and was able to make the repair, refill the cooling system and be on my way. A very small price to pay for all the hundreds of hot showers and clean dishes we've enjoyed over the years.

me too
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2015, 07:34 AM   #34
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,996
Greetings,
Mr. j. I always look forward to your posts. Your perspective is indeed an encouragement to those of us in "the cheaper seats". Get 'er done.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2015, 08:05 AM   #35
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
"My question is should I sue silicone or rubber hose?"

At only 200F or so ,rubber hose is just fine for most folks.

Evans coolant with 260 as working engine temps , the silicone would be better.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2015, 02:05 PM   #36
Member
 
Grinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 8
Hi Alaskan Sea-Duction, Thanks again for the photos, I finally got a chance to get to the boat to try to find the same connections, below zero here in Maine! Do you use a circulation pump with this connection or does the engine provide the flow and which way does the flow go? I would assume the connection close to the thermostats is the outflow connection but the other connection a much larger diameter port on mine. I'm also going back behind the engine to get to the hot water heater so it seems a little far. I even thought of tapping off the pipe that comes out of the oil cooler going back to the turbo as there are numerous hose connections along this route.
Grinder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2015, 06:49 PM   #37
Hospitality Officer
 
Andy G's Avatar
 
City: Pittwater
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Sarawana
Vessel Model: IG 36 Quad Cabin
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction View Post
This what I found on WM


From Kuuma:

With the same ignition-protected design and features as the West Marine water heaters described above, Kuuma water heaters are installed as original equipment on many boats, including Sea Ray, Four Winns, Hunter, Beneteau, and Boston Whaler. Like West Marine water heaters, Kuuma water heaters are protected by a high-temperature limiter with automatic reset. Use of a magnesium anode is recommended to extend tank life.
  • Port Sizes: Cold/hot in/out: 1/2" NPT, Engine coolant in/out: 5/8" (for hose)
  • Draw: 12.5A @ 120V AC; 6.25A @ 240V AC
  • Approvals: ETL
    [*]Warranty: One year against manufacturer defects
Interesting, I am just overhauling my hot water system, replacing hoses etc. I have a the Force 10 made by Kuuma they are sold with a two year warranty here, all other specs are the same as above except we use 240Volts .

Not that that helps mind you. The unit has failed, with water leaking out the base, this just on three years.

I am getting fed up with appliances only just outliving their warranty period. On cheap purchases fair enough you get what you paid for, however when you spend $650 the product should have a reasonable operating life.

Well that's my whinge for today, back to the bilge to sort it out.
Andy G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2015, 01:52 AM   #38
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,096
Keep it coming Jeffnick.
Regardless of affordability, there are great advantages for keeping it simple.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2015, 02:15 AM   #39
Guru
 
dhmeissner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
Keep it coming Jeffnick.
Regardless of affordability, there are great advantages for keeping it simple.
__________________
Dave & Suzie - Roughwater 35
http://thepromiserwb1029.org/2012/09...the-promise-2/
dhmeissner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2015, 05:52 PM   #40
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinder View Post
Hi Alaskan Sea-Duction, Thanks again for the photos, I finally got a chance to get to the boat to try to find the same connections, below zero here in Maine! Do you use a circulation pump with this connection or does the engine provide the flow and which way does the flow go? I would assume the connection close to the thermostats is the outflow connection but the other connection a much larger diameter port on mine. I'm also going back behind the engine to get to the hot water heater so it seems a little far. I even thought of tapping off the pipe that comes out of the oil cooler going back to the turbo as there are numerous hose connections along this route.
No pump here. I am not sure of flow diection as I have not had mine apart.....yet....
__________________

__________________
1988 M/Y Camargue Yacht Fisher
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/
Alaskan Sea-Duction is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012