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Old 04-16-2014, 09:31 PM   #21
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If you do a little research on PEX fittings I think you will find that all the barbed fittings intended for PEX tubing are made of brass, not plastic or nylon. Plastic or nylon barbed fittings are fine for the softer vinyl tubing but I suspect there's a very fine line between compressing the harder PEX tubing to conform to the plastic or nylon barbed fittings enough to prevent leaks or blowing off and cracking the fittings.

http://www.supplyhouse.com/PEX-Fittings-37000

Of course it's your boat and your decision but I wouldn't count on the dealer to do it "right", only to do enough to send you on your way.
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Old 04-16-2014, 09:42 PM   #22
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After looking at the PEX fitting link it's obvious that I do not have them. There is a brand on these hoses but I don't remember what it is. I'll get it and post it here.
Again, thanks!
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:14 PM   #23
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Plastic is a very common pex fitting...some prefer it rather than adding cheaper brass in the marine environment...

Fittings - PEX Pipe & Fittings - Pipes, Fittings & Valves - Plumbing¬*at The Home Depot
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:19 PM   #24
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I don't get it. There is a nylon or plastic fitting that the hose slides onto so the hose won't keep compressing to the point of distortion, and I'm careful to not over tighten.

The crimp rings that are now being used snug the hose tight to the fitting just as a worm gear clamp does. The one leak that my dealer fixed was fixed with a worm gear clamp.

Totally agree to let this happen under warranty. The crimp rings are a pain for several reasons

Thanks to all for your thoughtful comments.
The operative words in my post are "bearing down". If the fitting is not designed for clamps that can be torqued down beyond their capacity....
And the design of the fitting is not going to mate well with the type of hose being fitted....
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:00 PM   #25
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I don't get it. There is a nylon or plastic fitting that the hose slides onto so the hose won't keep compressing to the point of distortion, and I'm careful to not over tighten.
The crimp rings that are now being used snug the hose tight to the fitting just as a worm gear clamp does. The one leak that my dealer fixed was fixed with a worm gear clamp.
rclarke246,
I've dealt with PEX on my boats and RVs, and bought a PEX crimp tool at hardware store. PEX tubing is stiffer than most plastic water tubing you may have dealt with in the past. While you may be able to crank down on a screw type hose clamp far enough to hold pressure, the tiny clamp will be stressed far beyond it's intended use range. I have made emergency repairs to PEX using hose clamps, but I first warmed the tubing with a hair dryer so that it was a little more pliable. However, there is no way I'd trust a hose clamp any longer than it would take to get a proper PEX clamp crimped in its place.
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Old 04-17-2014, 12:38 AM   #26
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Those clamps are NOT pex. They are called 'O'clamps and made by OETIKER.
Some Other mfgs. may have copied them as I have seen some that did not have the Oetiker stamp but look for Oetiker.
Look them up. There are single ear and double ear clamps, plated steel AND SS
They must be set with a pincer type plier. The same plier can be used to cut them off.
I stopped using the single ear type years ago for the reason you are finding, leaks. I use only the double ear type now except for very tiny hoses, under 1/4" od

The clamps and pliers are cheap enough. They do require the proper sizing to the hose/tube or they will be too tight or loose.
They are good clamps and properly chosen and set will hold reliably in applications like this.

Part of the problem could be the nylon ftgs. If they are a light wall they may not like the clamp pressure especially those used in the hot water circuit, softening and collapsing with the heat and pressure.

Get the double ear type.

This should be warranty work.
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:26 AM   #27
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............. This should be warranty work.
The fact that the dealer used a hose clamp for the first warranty repair is troubling. Either the dealer felt that the factory job was unsatisfactory or the dealer didn't know how to make a proper repair.
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:46 AM   #28
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The pex clamps put an amazing amount of pressure on the tubing and the fitting. A hose clamp could come nowhere hear that amount of pressure. The pex clamps shown in the picture are the older style automotive clamps.
When we used those they did their job very well. Leaks could be due to an uncalibrated tool or an inexperienced installer. If you have one leak, typically the fitting needs to be cut out and a new one installed.
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:50 AM   #29
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Is this the style of clamp on the pipe?
HCL0500 - HydroPEX HCL0500 - 1/2" Stainless Steel Clamp (100/bag)
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:31 PM   #30
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No, mine do not look like that. Mine have an aluminum look to them. I suppose the one shown in the link is the "double eared" one referenced previously mentioned by C lectric
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:46 PM   #31
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No, mine do not look like the one in the link. That must be the "double eared" style referenced by C lectric?

Mine has a more simple and aluminum look to it.

I have "suggested" to the dealer that the installed fitting system, as installed, is looking unreliable.

I plan to switch on the water heater and apply the pressure that the "city" water hook-up will provide, as suggested in an earlier post.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:09 PM   #32
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No, mine do not look like the one in the link. That must be the "double eared" style referenced by C lectric?

Mine has a more simple and aluminum look to it.

I have "suggested" to the dealer that the installed fitting system, as installed, is looking unreliable.

I plan to switch on the water heater and apply the pressure that the "city" water hook-up will provide, as suggested in an earlier post.
The real question is - Are all the 2012 Swift Trawler 44 s built the same as yours?
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:12 PM   #33
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No, mine do not look like the one in the link. That must be the "double eared" style referenced by C lectric?

Mine has a more simple and aluminum look to it.

I have "suggested" to the dealer that the installed fitting system, as installed, is looking unreliable.

I plan to switch on the water heater and apply the pressure that the "city" water hook-up will provide, as suggested in an earlier post.
City water pressure can vary greatly. Maybe you could just pressure test your system to 100psi. you could fill teh system with water (probably already filled) then use an air compressor to bump it up to whatever you like.

Scott
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:27 PM   #34
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The real question is - Are all the 2012 Swift Trawler 44 s built the same as yours?
Great point! I'll check the 2014's. If they are improved it may make my case.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:29 PM   #35
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City water pressure can vary greatly. Maybe you could just pressure test your system to 100psi. you could fill teh system with water (probably already filled) then use an air compressor to bump it up to whatever you like.

Scott
There is a pressure regulator but I do not know the limit. Gotta be higher than the little pump aboard. Another good point, though.

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Old 04-17-2014, 07:50 PM   #36
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City water pressure can vary greatly. Maybe you could just pressure test your system to 100psi. you could fill teh system with water (probably already filled) then use an air compressor to bump it up to whatever you like.

Scott

Our city water system is regulated at the houses to 60 psi. My boat is regulated at 40 psi. I'd not do a 100 psi test as your system may not even if perfect fittings be able to take it. Water heaters, toilet valves, faucets, ice makers etc could be at risk with inordinately high pressure.

Your problem is simple, get the builder involved citing AYBC etc as you see fit. But I doubt the builder will be impressed with a system in tatters as recommended by internet chatter.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:57 PM   #37
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Most boats that permanently connect to city water have a regulator that is a few psi higher than the on board pump system. ....say around 50 psi

No telling when during a production run that a manufacturer changes entire systems...many things manufactured go by serial numbers or lot numbers because year groups are meaningless much of the time.

many boaters/RVers have a pressure gauge either temporary or built in just for this reason...some buy the $15 version at HD or Lowes that can screw on to a hose bib or go for a more permanent one.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:03 PM   #38
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Our city water system is regulated at the houses to 60 psi. ........... .
Only if you have a pressure regulator at your home.

Street pressure cannot be closely regulated because consumption varies widely. I had a problem at my house and bought a pressure gauge. Pressure was 95 PSI. It varies during the day.

As more houses are connected and water is used the pressure will drop.

Halftime during the super bowl is a good example.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:28 PM   #39
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Only if you have a pressure regulator at your home..
We do, all of neighbors too. Set to 60 PSI as recommended by the water company due to pressure swings similar to those you note.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:36 PM   #40
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We do, all of neighbors too. Set to 60 PSI as recommended by the water company due to pressure swings similar to those you note.
And why many people have regulators in their homes, boats and RVs.....
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