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Old 11-30-2015, 06:10 AM   #1
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Forced Air Diesel Heater Exhaust Pipe

The new forced air diesel heater works great! But...

First time running it, the exhaust pipe got up to a certain temperature then began smoking. I had a fiberglass sleeve on the pipe, which I'd ordered along with the pipe. Could this have been the source of the smoke?

I shut it down, and ordered some proper heat shield exhaust pipe insulation.

But meanwhile I'm wondering, Is this normal? Should I just wait until whatever it was burns off, or should I strip off the fiberglass sleeve and start over with the quality insulation?

Word to anyone installing one of these: those exhaust pipes get HOT!
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Old 11-30-2015, 06:34 AM   #2
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Hot enough to flash off anything on the tube, hot enough to warrant the fiberglass sleeve, hot tnough to discolor the stanless exhaust outlet....but not hot enough to start a fire if properly installed, nothing is stored against the tube and proper airflow is available.


I have a Wallas DT - 40 and it really doesn't get that hot unless on high for hours when there is little wind.


mine is mounted under the helm seat in a cabinet where the top of the heater is within a foot of the top of the cabinet. Once it was on a test run and the exhaust hose was off as I forgot to stick it on or it came off...the cabinet got very hot inside but there was no scorching of the wood above or even a real burning smell.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:21 AM   #3
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The first time you run the furnace oils left over from the manufacturing process are going to burn off.

The fiberglass sleeve that comes with the pipe is just fine.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:48 AM   #4
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Safety first. What does the manufacturer say the heater exhaust pipe temperature should be and where measured? What is yours?
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Old 12-01-2015, 09:34 AM   #5
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Today I ran a quick test: I took a section of exhaust pipe I'd cut off during the installation, and directed a propane torch at it.

I could easily get the same amount of smoke, with the same smell, as I had observed during the first firing of the furnace. This happened with and without the fiberglass sleeve.

The good news is the smoke stopped after the residual machining oils had burned off, and the fiberglass seemed none the worse for the overheating.

The plan now is to run the furnace up to temperature again, this time giving it a few minutes for the oils to burn off the exhaust, watching closely and monitoring the temperature. Unfortunately, the manual does not give specifics for exhaust temperature. I still plan to install the better insulation I ordered, as one more layer of protection.
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Old 12-01-2015, 10:58 AM   #6
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That exhaust pipe can easily get up to 500-600 degrees F. These furnaces unlike home heating oil furnaces are not very efficient. So lots of heat goes up the stack, and thus the temperatures are high.


Perfectly normal.


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Old 12-01-2015, 06:01 PM   #7
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What make of heater is it?
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Old 12-01-2015, 10:55 PM   #8
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Echo Rebel- What is the brand? We have the DT-30 Wallas. We installed as required with exhaust 12 inches above the furnace location. We had the initial smoke smell as explained within the instructions. Following a single initial burn cycle all was right with the world. We can hold our hand on the exhaust, while warm, not red hot to the touch. That includes any long burn run.

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Old 12-02-2015, 02:00 AM   #9
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The Wallas exhaust wont get hot because it is a tube within a tube design.

The inner tube is exhaust and the outer tube is combustion air.

Many other brands utilize a single tube exhaust which can get really hot. Thats why the fiberglass sock the OP was refering to.
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Old 12-02-2015, 02:15 AM   #10
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Correct Ksanders I forgot that feature, once installed and fired all forgotten!!
Just a great maintenance free unit.

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Old 12-02-2015, 06:58 AM   #11
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The 2 smaller Wallas models do have the tube within a tube exhause...but the Wallas DT-40 only has a single tube exhaust with fiberglass sleeve....at least for the last 3 years.


Still waiting to hear which make/model Capt Tom has.
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Old 12-02-2015, 10:23 AM   #12
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OK, OK. I wasn't going to spill this until I was satisfied it was working.

I took a chance and bought the Russian-made Planar 4KW (13,600BTU/H) unit on Amazon for under $650. Similar name brand units I looked at cost a lot more, and for me this is not a necessity. I figure, if anyone knows about cold, it's the Russians!

It came with all kinds of cool Cyrillic writing and Russian Post Office stickers on the box. The manual was obviously translated to English, but not as badly as some I've seen. They got a couple of colors wrong on the wiring diagram, but enough were correct that I figured out the rest. I'll probably re-write the operating instructions myself just so it's clear to me and anyone else using the controller.

On burn #2 the exhaust got up to around 550 F (290 C) at the point closest to the unit. That part didn't smoke at all, and the rest of it had also pretty much burned off by the time I shut it down.

At around 38F outside, with doors and hatches open, the cabin warmed up very quickly. This thing is going to make it significantly easier to spend the night on the hook during spring and fall.

I'm going to do one more closely monitored burn-off at full power, then add a layer of exhaust insulation and play around with the controller to see how it runs at other power levels.

My final upgrade will be to add a pump to allow me to transfer fuel from any of my diesel tanks directly to the small heater day tank. I've always wanted the ability to transfer between tanks anyway; this just requires one more valve and some hose.
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Old 12-02-2015, 11:33 AM   #13
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OK, OK. I wasn't going to spill this until I was satisfied it was working.

I took a chance and bought the Russian-made Planar 4KW (13,600BTU/H) unit on Amazon for under $650. Similar name brand units I looked at cost a lot more, and for me this is not a necessity. I figure, if anyone knows about cold, it's the Russians!

It came with all kinds of cool Cyrillic writing and Russian Post Office stickers on the box. The manual was obviously translated to English, but not as badly as some I've seen. They got a couple of colors wrong on the wiring diagram, but enough were correct that I figured out the rest. I'll probably re-write the operating instructions myself just so it's clear to me and anyone else using the controller.

On burn #2 the exhaust got up to around 550 F (290 C) at the point closest to the unit. That part didn't smoke at all, and the rest of it had also pretty much burned off by the time I shut it down.

At around 38F outside, with doors and hatches open, the cabin warmed up very quickly. This thing is going to make it significantly easier to spend the night on the hook during spring and fall.

I'm going to do one more closely monitored burn-off at full power, then add a layer of exhaust insulation and play around with the controller to see how it runs at other power levels.

My final upgrade will be to add a pump to allow me to transfer fuel from any of my diesel tanks directly to the small heater day tank. I've always wanted the ability to transfer between tanks anyway; this just requires one more valve and some hose.

Thats fantastic! A little competition is a very good thing!

everybody that I've heard of that took a chance on those Ruski units was very happy they did!
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Old 12-03-2015, 06:51 AM   #14
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Russians are not known for customer service , so you might purchase a couple heaters more for parts while you can.

The Espars are famous for needing parts annually ,
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Old 12-03-2015, 07:34 AM   #15
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Wow, sounds like a great unit, would love to see your installation when you get done.

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Old 12-03-2015, 11:32 AM   #16
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Russians are not known for customer service , so you might purchase a couple heaters more for parts while you can.

The Espars are famous for needing parts annually
An annual checkup makes a lot of sense, my home oil boiler gets one. As for parts, they are available, mostly from outlets in Europe and Canada. The manual has some detailed diagrams. And again, this is not a critical component to me; I've gotten by all these years without one.

I'm running it on kerosene for now, but I'll switch to diesel if I start using it a lot. Then back to kero before any prolonged lay-up. That should help keep things clean. Also, the manual says to run it for at least five minutes every month, even if it's warm out. Interesting that they felt the need to add that last bit. I plan to follow that advice.

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Wow, sounds like a great unit, would love to see your installation when you get done.
You might regret asking. There isn't much to show. The only thing visible in the cabin will be the hot air vent, and outside just a small fitting on the transom. Here's a look under the drawers in the aft cabin:


And from the front (still with the drawers removed):
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Old 12-03-2015, 11:58 AM   #17
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If that picture is right side up, then the Espars are mounted 180 degrees differently. Air in and exhaust out mounted facing down on the Espar. Any moisture in that set-up would dribble into exchanger causing white smoke on start up, and possible corrosion.
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Old 12-03-2015, 12:46 PM   #18
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After looking at pic again, I see that we are looking down on it. Dont know if this orientation, is approved by Planer or not. Espar requires the combustion intake and exhaust to be down.
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Old 12-03-2015, 02:00 PM   #19
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After looking at pic again, I see that we are looking down on it. Dont know if this orientation, is approved by Planer or not. Espar requires the combustion intake and exhaust to be down.
I know I've seen similar references for other brands, not sure about Espar. But this excerpt from the Planar manual is pretty clear. Basically, the igniter is angled at 45 degrees into the combustion chamber, so you can mount it anywhere within the 90 degree arc that leaves the igniter more or less "up".

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