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Old 09-11-2012, 09:06 AM   #21
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Plenty of safe alternatives to Halon now available and Halon itself is now banned completely in most Euro countries, Australia etc. An earlier post references FM-200 and this seems to be FireBoy's choice outside the US, which is lagging in completely banning Halon apparently because of the very large installed base.
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:43 AM   #22
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http://stoodyind.com/safety/msds/HALON%201301.pdf

http://www.kiddeaerospace.com/Files/...008EU_1107.pdf

These are the MSDSs for Halon 1301(old) and FM200(latest). Halon 1301 is being phased out primarily for environmental issues.

I am not arguing one for the other but each has its hazards. I don't see how either system properly sized to achieve the proper concentration in a machinery space causes a problem. Like most discussions it is better to parse out the facts than run with hyperbole. No argument here just some more facts that might help someone (and me) make up their mind This is a good topic!
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:30 AM   #23
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Rickb is correct about halon. The marine industry switched to Halon from CO2 because Halon is safer. Halon will put out a fire at concentrations low enough to be harmless to humans, CO2 won't. The danger with Halon and all it's replacements comes when you use a bottle to big for the space.

Halon was banned because of it's effect on the ozone layer, not because it was dangerous.

A properly sized Halon or Halon replacement system will not stop an engine and the engine might suck the Halon out before it can put out the fire. All automatic Halon systems should have an automatic engine shut down.

Neither Halon or CO2 should hurt an engine. I suspect that a dry chemical extinguisher would hurt the engine.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:00 PM   #24
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Our insurance company recommended/required an automatic shut off with alarm be installed on the gen set, not the 671. As the gen set that would be left running with no body on the boat and/or asleep. The reason for the shut down is so the engine does not suck the halon out of the engine room before the fire is really out.

If the engine has an electrical 12 volt solenoid to start/stop the engine, you can buy an automatic shut down for about 300 to 500 bucks. I had one built by a local electronic company for 75 bucks the trick is in the electronic module you can buy at most electronic stores.

Every year I have the fire extinguishers checked for about 75 bucks, which is money well spent being a live aboard.
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Old 09-11-2012, 02:42 PM   #25
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I would think that, in addition to whatever automatic fire suppression system you have in the ER or places like the lazerette, having an extinguisher in each stateroom would make you and any guests feel more comfortable, one or two in the pilothouse, one in the kitchen area, one in the salon (or saloon) space, one on the flybridge.
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Old 09-13-2012, 06:20 AM   #26
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A proper setup would secure bilge blowers and close vents before firing any extinguisher.
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Old 09-13-2012, 03:54 PM   #27
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FM200 turns into hydrofluoric acid when it hits a flame front, not pretty!
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Old 11-17-2012, 05:26 PM   #28
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I cannot believe Post #22 is correct: would the major manufacturers & the regulators have moved to FM200 in most countries around the world if that were really a problem??
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Old 11-17-2012, 05:45 PM   #29
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1,1,1,2...afluoropropane

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Old 11-17-2012, 06:33 PM   #30
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Nothing in that Wikipedia reference to suggest a problem when used as manufacturers intend (& no reference to FM200 either)
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Old 11-18-2012, 04:35 AM   #31
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Way to go guys… just when I thought I had a handle on my to do list… you bring this up… one more thing to look into on Shintullah
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Old 11-18-2012, 06:05 AM   #32
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DRY POWDER type units can be a huge "later" problem.

The dust is so fine it can find its way into sealed switches and CB , and most electronics and keep them from working.

Aircraft cockpits use CO2 to avoid a million dollar refit.

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Old 11-18-2012, 08:43 AM   #33
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A friend of mine who has had his DeFever 55 for over 20 yrs had a different problem with the onboard Halon system. The dual tank system was installed when he purchased the boat. An electrical short started a fire in the ER. The stbd tank reacted properly but the distribution system had perished with age and so was not effective against the fire. The second (portside) tank did not open but unfortunately was directly mounted above the fire. The heat exploded the tank. It created a two ft. diameter hole in salon floor and completely destroyed the galley area. He managed to put out the fire with his saltwater deck wash. Walters repairs to the ER and everthing else is an amazing story for another time - especially for a 76 yr. old singlehander.

He has NOT reinstalled any automatic fire suspression system that involves hi-pressure tankage.
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