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Old 01-31-2015, 01:18 PM   #41
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OC - your right. I found the pump I use in the well on the internet. It is a Wayne 60gpm pump. The riser is ridged 1 1/2", 7ft. Then there is 75' of fire hose. The volume of water the pump pushes at the end of the hose, is such, that the hose is fully round. As for my previous post, I have no idea where that came from. I apologize. Thanks, Tonto.
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Old 01-31-2015, 01:45 PM   #42
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One of the advantages of using the engine intake as a emergency bilge pump is that the same system can be your fresh water flush system. There is nothing a salt water engine likes better after use than a nice fresh water flush. Two birds with one stone.
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Old 01-31-2015, 05:24 PM   #43
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All compartments drain to the aft bilge. The pump will be at the same level as the generator. As soon as the high(er) water alarm sounds it will be engaged.
What switches it on? A DC - AC relay?
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:06 AM   #44
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The hassles with using the engine sea water pump are at least 2,

Its pretty small and doesnt usually move much water , esp compared to a dedicated engine pump, a 2 inch Jabsco engine driven is 100+ real gallons per min.

The other hassle is in a real flooding situation lots of trash will be washing in the bilge water , and many sea strainers are nor easy to clean, esp if partially flooded.

The big diaphram pumps like a 2 inch Edson will gobble reash with ease , can be hand , electric or hyd powered.
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:40 AM   #45
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http://www.pumpbiz.com/shopping_prod....asp?pid=73739

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What about something like this? 20 lbs. Not too bulky to store. Propane so you know it will start.
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:47 AM   #46
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Emergency bilge pump

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Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
http://www.pumpbiz.com/shopping_prod....asp?pid=73739

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What about something like this? 20 lbs. Not too bulky to store. Propane so you know it will start.

Nah, don't want to have to go scrambling to get propane tank and the pump, also it probably couldn't pump near 280gpm. From the looks of it.

Edit: just looked at the specs it pumps 30GPM, no thanks. Like PS said its just a propane rule pump.
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:55 AM   #47
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It's just the little brother of bigger Honda trash pumps....

I wouldn't bother with the propane either.

Quick disconnect for the gas tank that can be stored above decks and a 3 inch pump will blow your mind on how much water it can move...

If you don't run a big genset all the time....something like what cardude posted or its bigger brothers is basically it with the Rule 8000 a distant second. Maybe some submersibles off a big inverter...but I wouldn't do it that way.
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Old 02-03-2015, 08:02 AM   #48
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It's just the little brother of bigger Honda trash pumps....

I wouldn't bother with the propane either.

Quick disconnect for the gas tank that can be stored above decks and a 3 inch pump will blow your mind on how much water it can move...

If you don't run a big genset all the time....something like what cardude posted or its bigger brothers is basically it with the Rule 8000 a distant second. Maybe some submersibles off a big inverter...but I wouldn't do it that way.

We run our generator quite often, actually almost always. So that's not a biggy.
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Old 02-03-2015, 08:02 AM   #49
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What switches it on? A DC - AC relay?

I'm not quite sure, I was just going to put it on a isolated breaker.
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Old 02-03-2015, 08:20 AM   #50
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I'm not quite sure, I was just going to put it on a isolated breaker.
You said it would come on when the high water alarm goes off. That implied it would come on automatically. Since you don't want AC current current running around your wet bilge to a float switch I was just wondering how you intended to trigger the pump.
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Old 02-03-2015, 09:36 AM   #51
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You said it would come on when the high water alarm goes off. That implied it would come on automatically. Since you don't want AC current current running around your wet bilge to a float switch I was just wondering how you intended to trigger the pump.
Oh didn't mean to trigger the pump, just a higher then average float switch in the bilge to let me know there is a good amount of water in the bilge and i should turn the pump on. Still exploring the possibilities, what do you think would be best?
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Old 02-03-2015, 10:11 AM   #52
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I have a very high volume dedicated emergency bilge pump on my boat and have actually used it once. I had a leak related to changing a seawater pump and when I got back to the boat (after a trip of several hours (to town)) the bilge water was up to my engine mounts. Didn't need the high volume of course but my emotional state did. Was reassuring to see that water level go down fast.
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Old 02-03-2015, 04:01 PM   #53
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FF, you make two good points. The pumps on smaller engines might not be worth the trouble. My engine has an 1-1/4" pump that I think will move about 1000 GPM. It's not a lot but it's enough for me to go to the trouble of rigging it.


I was once on a forty something sportfish that was sinking. It had two big engines with 2" pumps on them. The seacocks were easy to get to. I was thinking about cutting the hoses off the seacocks if the Coasties hadn't arrived with their 3" gasoline pump.


Debris is going to be a problem with any pump. On my set up there is a strainer down in the bilge and then the water goes through the sea strainer.


The engine cooling pump will only be used if the three electric pumps can't keep up with the water.


If I had room, I'd install a big belt driven pump or carry a propane powered pump.
If I had a generator, I'd do what Oliver is doing. I'd look into putting a float switch on the high voltage pump. Maybe use a low voltage float switch and a relay.
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Old 02-04-2015, 06:36 AM   #54
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An inch and a quarter pump 1 1/4 that moves 1000GPM?

Thats a heck of a pump since a 2 inch impeller clutched Jabso is only 100GPM.

Perhaps you mean 1000 G P HOUR?

I hope the strum box (the first strainer) is on an easy to find rope so it can easily be lifted to clear it with out diving .

Trash is far less of a problem with a huge diaphram pump than an impeller unit.

The big boys use a centrifugal but with 6 or more inches of pump,it takes its own diesel.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:21 AM   #55
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GPM, Lift, HP KW, Amps

Moving water is a function of work. The work can be converted to horsepower. One HP = 746 Watts. Knowing the voltage on the system you can calculate the Amps. Watts= Volts X Amps. 746watts/12volts=62.16amps.
If your running you emergency pump on batteries you will need the capacity to support it.
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:44 AM   #56
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Ff, I have a magic 1-1/4" pump! You're right, I meant GPH. I won't need to dive to the strum box unless the boat has already sunk. My boat isn't that big.

I'd love to have a huge diaphragm pump but I don't have room for one. I already have the pump on my engine. Seems silly not to be able to use it in an emergency.
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:13 PM   #57
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Oh didn't mean to trigger the pump, just a higher then average float switch in the bilge to let me know there is a good amount of water in the bilge and i should turn the pump on. Still exploring the possibilities, what do you think would be best?
Personally I would want it to come on automatically (with a locking manual over ride) so it would come on whether anyone was aboard or not.
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:00 AM   #58
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Automatic is good ,,, IF it can run dry for a week and not catch fire.

O Toole said Murphy was an Optimist!

Stuff happens,
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:40 AM   #59
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All well and good to have spare pumping onboard. But, when cruising and without relying upon cameras, how often do you:
  • Check the ER for untold things like water appearing where once there was none?
  • Look at all bilge pump areas for things wet?
  • Examine your rudder posts, shaft logs and stabilizer through hull locations?
Other questions to internalize and debate:
  • Do you carry a life raft?
  • Do you leave your dock based water hose connected and under pressure when vessel at the dock?
  • Are your through hulls readily available and closed when you are not on the vessel?
  • Can you swim?
  • Do you cruise with both charts and plotters in use?
  • Are you a proponent of single hand cruising especially at night with vessel on AP and skipper asleep?
  • A really easy way to use your engines and gensets to get rid of hull breach water is to take off the strainer caps, with engines running and seacocks flooded and closed of course. Love those twins and gensets - more emergency pumps!
BTW, my favorite kind of emergency pump is a high flow rate electric sump design that has a long discharge hose and power cord that allows it to be used in places other than the ER.

And last but not least, stay away from cruise ships if you are really concerned about dangers afloat.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:03 PM   #60
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Automatic is good ,,, IF it can run dry for a week and not catch fire.

O Toole said Murphy was an Optimist!

Stuff happens,
It would only come on if there is water present so running dry would not be an issue. And you would obviously have an high water alarm as well. And if you get slightly high tech you could get a call or text to alert you and/or others as to the issue.
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