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Old 05-03-2013, 10:52 AM   #21
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Rick what's a Deutz? I googled it and only found a German tractor in the first couple of pages.

It's pretty common practice on boats to use terminal strips in protected areas like engine rooms. In exposed locations you mount them in boxes.

Terminal strips are a great way to connect two or more wires to one. Just use terminal block jumpers to make a common connection. You could use a buss bar for this but I think a terminal strip looks neater.

I always use terminal strips when I install bilge pumps. It makes changing them very easy.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:59 AM   #22
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He meant Deutsch.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:00 AM   #23
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Quote:
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More to the point, why are there exposed electrical connections?

Why on Earth install a terminal strip for that purpose in the first place?
RickB is correct IMHO.

Why locate a terminal strip under water pumps and fittings? Most water pumps are on a separate breaker so they can be independently turned off, a terminal strip defeats that purpose if you hook other items up to it.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:03 AM   #24
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An accumulator tank does more than soften the pumps work.

It also has to absorb the water expanded by heating hot water.

AS our boats have HW heaters of 6-10gal that mat heat from 65F to 190F (engine or noisemaker water coil) the pressure can get quite high.

I assume the non accum. pumps simply bleed the pressure back into the water source.

I do not know if thew accum. shown on Coots install has a bladder .

If not the unit must be emptied about monthly to replace the air absorbed by the water in it.
With no way to pressurize it one of the biggest advantages of an accumulator is lost.

The ability to match the tank and pump pressure and get 1-3 gal of water with out the pump operating.

FF is right on in my book.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:26 PM   #25
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The terminal strip leading to the 24-volt water pump is not the only strip in the engine room. There is also one on the engine compartment forward wall:


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Old 05-04-2013, 01:01 AM   #26
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"Most water pumps are on a separate breaker so they can be independently turned off, a terminal strip defeats that purpose if you hook other items up to it."

Are you maybe confusing a terminal strip with a buss bar? Terminal strips are used to join individual wires like you could do with crimp on butt connectors. The advantage is that if you need to remove a wire it doesn't need to be cut. It has no effect on how switches and circuit breakers work in the circuit.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:25 AM   #27
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Are you maybe confusing a terminal strip with a buss bar?
Buss or terminal strip, they should not have exposed terminals in an unprotected area such as shown in the photos.

There are protective covers available from most manufacturers and they should be used. Those covers protect the terminals from water or fuel spray and contact with "stuff" that might fall on them. They help keep the terminals clean to reduce corrosion.

Protecting terminals is simply good practice and replacing them after maintenance is good boatkeeping. An unprotected terminal might do more damage to your boat than lack of a fuel polishing system or the wake of a passing boat.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:55 AM   #28
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Covers certainly couldn't hurt. It's pretty common to cover buss bars but terminal strips usually are not covered. I guess because the design makes it difficult to accidently short between the terminals. Blue Sea Systems makes covers for all their buss bars but doesn't make covers for their terminal strips. Ancor doesn't make covers for their terminal strips either. Might be a good idea for them to make covers. It would give me something else to sell.

Anchor makes a Pin Terminal Strip that is less open than the common terminal strips but is is limited to about 25 amps.
Pin Terminal Blocks | Marinco
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:15 AM   #29
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Sorry, but IMHO open terminals under water systems or worse yet adjacent to a pressurized fuel system is just plain wrong if not dangerous. In an industrial setting, in the case of flammables, it would be a shutdown and big fine when noted by the regulators. Ever read about coal mine disasters?
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:27 AM   #30
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RickB and Sunchaser, how about some pictures of how wire connections are made on your boats?

I'm just saying that uncovered terminal strips are pretty common on boats and don't seem to cause any problems. I wonder what the ABYC has to say on the subject?
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:32 PM   #31
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RickB and Sunchaser, how about some pictures of how wire connections are made on your boats? ?
Nice try Hopcar. Whether the electric connections around my fuel transfer pump or under my water pump are "top notch" (they are) or not is hardly the issue. The issue is quite simple, open connections around liquids are not good practice and non comforming if flammables are involved.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:58 PM   #32
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I have an exposed terminal strip for my flybridge radar and chartplotter located inside a storage area (console?) where I also keep my metallic radar reflector when not in use. And yes you guessed it - the radar reflector touched the exposed strip and blew fuses. The terminal strip is now temporarily fixed with electrical tape as its cover.
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:11 PM   #33
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RickB and Sunchaser, how about some pictures of how wire connections are made on your boats?

I use these, Electrical Installation Accessories, or a version of that make but prefer to use proper waterproof feed-throughs like on the little box pictured with three of them fitted. You can even buy the parts at Home Depot.

They not only protect the connections, reduce the chance of a fire, ground, or short, they look like a professional boat builder installed them.
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:45 PM   #34
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RickB, that excellent. That's the setup I recommend to my customers for use in exposed locations. Newmar makes a wide range of waterproof terminal strip boxes but I'm sure you saved a few bucks making it up from off the shelf parts.
Here is a link to the Newmar boxes: DC Power Onboard with Newmar offers Water Proof Junction Boxes and Splashproof Junction Boxes. Water Proof Boxes are ideal for making wiring connections above or below decks, even in areas subject to occasional spray. Splashproof Boxes Provides for s
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:22 AM   #35
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RickB, that excellent.
A plus is that the blank cover plate provides an opportunity to install an isolation switch or an LED indicator light to monitor or control circuits that are routed through the box.
You don't have to solidly mount a terminal strip in the box, it can just lie there supported by the wires. Buy long strips and cut them to the number of terminals required.

If you want to do a really professional job, use larger boxes and install DIN rails and components.

Don't let cheap Chinese labor and low budget techniques set your standards.
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:55 PM   #36
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We have just removed our accumulator tank because it was not holding pressure from our pump. Although the pump output is 45 psi, the accumulator would drop down to 20 to 30 psi as soon as a tap was opened and not go back up to 45 psi for some time. (The accumulator is rated up to 125 psi.) The 30 psi the accumulator provided didn't seem to be enough pressure to properly flood the bowl of the head. Without the accumulator, it now seems to be flush better.

Of course, now the pump cycles on as soon as any water is used. The pressure stays pretty constant at 45psi but I don't know how hard this will be on the pump - it is a new Shurflo.
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Old 07-09-2013, 05:14 PM   #37
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Did your accumulator precharge look normal? Here's a good link to some accumulator FAQs.
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Old 07-09-2013, 05:27 PM   #38
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We 'rebooted' the system (not a particularly nautical term) as per instructions provided. The system pressurized up to 45 psi but immediately drops to 30 psi as soon as water is used. The pump seems to 'think' that the appropriate pressure is in the accumulator because it won't come on until pressure drops even further to about 20 psi... It is an older model jabsco accumulator (2 gallons) and the instructions and info provided don't include much detailed info.
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:24 PM   #39
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I agree with FlyWright, that you need to look at the charge pressure in you accumulator.

Sounds like the pressure is at 30 psi in the accumulator, and that you are stretching the bladder to get to 45 psi. Immediately when you open a faucet, the bladder stretch will be released, and you will be back to the 30 psi air pressure charge. I think you will want to correct this issue before you damage the bladder inside the accumulator.

Normally all you need to correct this is a tire pressure guage, and a tire pump.
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:35 PM   #40
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I agree with FlyWright, that you need to look at the charge pressure in you accumulator.

Sounds like the pressure is at 30 psi in the accumulator, and that you are stretching the bladder to get to 45 psi. Immediately when you open a faucet, the bladder stretch will be released, and you will be back to the 30 psi air pressure charge. I think you will want to correct this issue before you damage the bladder inside the accumulator.

Normally all you need to correct this is a tire pressure guage, and a tire pump.
So how do we change the pressure from 30 psi to 45 psi.... you mention using a tire pressure gauge and a tire pump... could you explain a little more! The manual gives us no details about changing pressure amounts. Are you suggesting that we try to pump in more air at the top valve to increase the pressure?
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