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Old 02-01-2013, 03:42 PM   #41
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Greetings,
Stand up tanks on their sides? I agree NOT a good thing. "Uniflite used that set up in the fatcory install and can be replaced with stand up tanks laid on the side." Don't understand Mr. OFB. That reads like it's OK to use stand up tanks on their side which it's not. Please clarify.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:43 PM   #42
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I...........After considering all this, a steel tank could be the cheapest way to go. Pay $30-$40, use till its too rusty or out of date, and buy a new one. .............
Or exchange it at the local supermarket, gas station, or home center. Let them paint/recertify the tank.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:00 PM   #43
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Greetings,
Stand up tanks on their sides? I agree NOT a good thing. "Uniflite used that set up in the fatcory install and can be replaced with stand up tanks laid on the side." Don't understand Mr. OFB. That reads like it's OK to use stand up tanks on their side which it's not. Please clarify.


The tank "stand" is important for correct use. By stand I mean the ring or feet that are welded to the tank that suggest how it should be mounted.

RT sorry to confuse. But I mean its easy to place a standard tank into the location uniflite intended for a side mount tank too go. Using a standard uprite tank in this location that was intended for a side mount can be an issue.

I used uniflite as an example but I do see this on bridge mounts ( under the eye brow ) of trawlers and such.

As tank design and regs changed being cheap ass boaters makes for some interesting choices. Instead of a new valve on an exsisting tank the home depot job looks the same smells the same so must be the same even if its 1/2 the cost.

But it might not be quite the same.

Sorry to confuse, my bad. Its a TC thing.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:10 PM   #44
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Sorry Anode I am trying to be way too quick with this.

Yes I spray the outside of the tank, but even a wet rag will work.

No it will not always freeze at the level but the water vapor from the spray hangs around on the tank where the level of liquid propane is even if will not freeze.

Could be a wet coast thing dont know but give it a try.

Also just a quick note. Propane bottles are not filled to the top. Its like 80 % when full.

And another note. From time to time I see the regular 10 and or 20 lb propane bottle used on boats and RVs laid on there side. Folk replace bottles valved to be on there side with regular bottles placed on there side. Not a good thing. The tank "stand" is important for correct use. Uniflite used that set up in the fatcory install and can be replaced with stand up tanks laid on the side. Just an example and an FYI
Okay, we're getting closer to being on the same wavelength. I'm familiar with the condensation 'marks' on tanks when conditions are correct. But freezing no. Sounds like you've got a simple solution that works for you.
Yes, 80% is the correct fill level for above ground tanks. You probably know there's a slotted screw on the base of the tank valve that's a 80% bleeder valve screw. Loosen the screw and vapor will come out until the tank is 80% full then liquid comes out. The new opd valves are designed to close at the 80% level also.
There are some older horizontal vapor tanks (vapor comes out the valve) out there that are designed to be on their side. I believe Marin has them on his GB. They are acceptable and exempt from the opd law as he has stated on the TF before. Most horizontal tanks are liquid tanks (liquid comes out the valve) designed for fork lifts, floor buffers etc. which requires an external vaporizer.
All propane tanks have relief valves somewhere that must not be covered in the liquid. Only vapor. Relief valves will release if pressures are exceeded (think fire) to prevent tanks from exploding. Vertical tanks have the relief valve in the valve stem. Horizontal tanks have relief valves designed to be orientated to the upper side in the vapor so even though you can lay them down the relief valve must be up.
If you have a question about your propane tank take it a propane dealer and ask. I'm sure they will be glad to help.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:53 PM   #45
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Anode

Great responce that realy helps clear up my poorly written words. I hope any way.

Thanks


Quote

"You probably know there's a slotted screw on the base of the tank valve that's a 80% bleeder valve screw. Loosen the screw and vapor will come out until the tank is 80% full then liquid comes out. "

Yes here we call them spit valves.
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:56 PM   #46
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Purpose-built horizontal tanks do not need OPD valves although most of the new ones have them. But if you have a pre-OPD horizontal tank--- which means it had to be made as a horizontal tank, not a vertical tank with homemade feet on it--- it can be refilled anywhere.

I do not believe our two horizontal tanks are vapor tanks. They are filled in the vertical position just like any other tank and the slotted "spit" valve is used to determine level just like the standard vertical BBQ tanks we use at home. The only difference is our boat tanks are made to be mounted horizontally.

We have one non-OPD horizontal tank and one newer OPD horizontal tank. The non-OPD tank has a sticker on it (required) that states that the tank does not have an OPD, and we keep on the boat a copy of the waiver that states that non-OPD horizontal tanks are legal to refill.

We've never had a problem getting our non-OPD tank re-filled.

We also had our older--- and expensive--- 1.5 gallon, non-OPD vertical aluminum tank that we use with the BBQ on the flying bridge re-valved by a welding shop in Seattle that does this sort of thing. Twenty-five bucks got a new OPD valve installed and the tank re-certified.
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:28 AM   #47
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Purpose-built horizontal tanks do not need OPD valves although most of the new ones have them. But if you have a pre-OPD horizontal tank--- which means it had to be made as a horizontal tank, not a vertical tank with homemade feet on it--- it can be refilled anywhere.

I do not believe our two horizontal tanks are vapor tanks. They are filled in the vertical position just like any other tank and the slotted "spit" valve is used to determine level just like the standard vertical BBQ tanks we use at home. The only difference is our boat tanks are made to be mounted horizontally.

We have one non-OPD horizontal tank and one newer OPD horizontal tank. The non-OPD tank has a sticker on it (required) that states that the tank does not have an OPD, and we keep on the boat a copy of the waiver that states that non-OPD horizontal tanks are legal to refill.

We've never had a problem getting our non-OPD tank re-filled.

We also had our older--- and expensive--- 1.5 gallon, non-OPD vertical aluminum tank that we use with the BBQ on the flying bridge re-valved by a welding shop in Seattle that does this sort of thing. Twenty-five bucks got a new OPD valve installed and the tank re-certified.
Marin, the industry considers a tank "liquid or vapor" by what comes out the valve when it's opened with the tank is in it's correct/designed orientation-horizontal or vertical.

"Vapor tanks' are filled with liquid and the valve discharges the vapor for use. The liquid level stays below the valve(pickup tube) by design.

"Liquid tanks" discharge liquid as the discharge valve (pickup tube) stays below the level of the liquid.

Both "liquid and vapor" tanks can/are filled with/to the 80% spitter valve.

If your tanks are 'liquid tanks' then your propane system would require an external vaporizer in order to work with your stove/oven. You can't feed liquid propane to a boat stove.

Liquid tank systems are designed for high useage applications -think engines and commercial boiler/heaters-where the rapid release of vapor from tank would cause low pressure and freezing of components.

I know I'm only an amateur backyard boat builder (your description) so you might want to check over on the Grand Bankaccounts Forum or with a propane professional in your area. I'm sure you'll let me know if I'm wrong.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:31 AM   #48
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Liquid tank systems are designed for high useage applications -think engines and commercial boiler/heaters-where the rapid release of vapor from tank would cause low pressure and freezing of components.- Chip

The single tank hanging under my Motorhome has two pickups, 1 - for the galley stove, at the top (vapor) and 2 - for the genset and the furnace, at the bottom (liquid).
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:18 AM   #49
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Liquid tank systems are designed for high useage applications -think engines and commercial boiler/heaters-where the rapid release of vapor from tank would cause low pressure and freezing of components.- Chip

The single tank hanging under my Motorhome has two pickups, 1 - for the galley stove, at the top (vapor) and 2 - for the genset and the furnace, at the bottom (liquid).
Yep, there are lots of specialized storage tanks and applications for propane well beyond the 20# Blue Rhino bottle at 7/11. One size doesn't fit all.
With that in mind -- don't believe what you read on internet forums. Consult your propane dealer.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:52 AM   #50
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I'm sure you'll let me know if I'm wrong.
I'm not saying you're wrong. It's just that you made it sound like we have some sort of unique tank in your earlier post. We don't. They are horizontal but the valve is on the end just like every other common-type propane tank. I once asked the guy at Suburban Propane what differentiated our horizontal tanks from the same shape Worthington upright tank and he said, "the feet." Otherwise, he said, they are identical.

Whether he's right or wrong I have no idea.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:23 PM   #51
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My understanding is that horizontal tanks, that supply vapor, have a pickup tube that terminates near the high point of the tank when it is horizontal. They are filled in a vertical position but must be used in a horizontal position. They are coming now with OPD valves to prevent overfiling.
If it didn't have a pickup tube at the high point, the tank would deliver liquid propane until it was half empty.

"This 20 lb aluminum horizontal propane tank holds roughly 4.7 gallons of propane. This is a great tank for marine use, it is light weight and is great for boats! This tank is to be used in its horizontal position only, yet filled in a vertical position. This tank is equipped with an OPD device in the fill valve."
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