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Old 06-13-2018, 07:36 AM   #21
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A pumice stone. I use it at home and onboard. No chemicals. Ace hardware carries the one with the handle. You would think it scratched a porcelain bowl, but it doesn’t.

I’m super careful what I put in the holding tank.
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Old 06-13-2018, 08:49 AM   #22
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I'd be reluctant to use any abrasive on porcelain, pumice WILL leave the surface scratched despite observations to the contrary. Those micro scratches promote further staining that will be progressively harder to remove. Use a stain remover like iron-out or something similar. Most are sodium hyposulfite, it won't be in contact with anything other than the porcelain long enough to be of concern, the effect on the holding tank negligible given the dilution. It's commonly used to backwash softeners where the water contains iron.
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Old 06-13-2018, 08:57 AM   #23
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Formaldyde evaporates quickly in the air, but:

"Formaldehyde Ė human and environmental poisonOne of the problems of formaldehyde is that products containing it slowly give off toxic vapors over time. For humans, inhaling atmospheric concentrations above 0.1 mg/kg can cause eye and mucous membrane irritation, breathing difficulties and headaches.
When in contact with the skin, it can cause irritation, burns and dermatitis, In large doses, formaldehyde can be lethal. The chemical is listed as a known human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
In many animals and birds, formaldehyde has the same effects as in humans when ingested or inhaled. It can also create reproductive problems such as low fertility. In an aquatic environment, formaldehyde is very and somewhat persistently toxic as it has a half life of between a day and ten days."

Chlorine, otoh, evaporates in water in 12-24 hours.

--Peggie
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:01 AM   #24
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I'd be reluctant to use any abrasive on porcelain, pumice WILL leave the surface scratched despite observations to the contrary. Those micro scratches promote further staining that will be progressively harder to remove. Use a stain remover like iron-out or something similar. Most are sodium hyposulfite, it won't be in contact with anything other than the porcelain long enough to be of concern, the effect on the holding tank negligible given the dilution. It's commonly used to backwash softeners where the water contains iron.
Been using it for years on my very expensive Italian toilets with no ill effects. Once every 6 months or so does the trick!
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:06 AM   #25
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Products containing Oxalic acid such as wood bleach, bar keepers friend, Y10 etc. Should all work well on the brown stain -just like they do on the river moustache! My personal favourite is Y10 'cus the gel is so darned easy to use. In the toilet you will need to dry the bowl before you use it.
+1. It is pretty much the same issue as the moustache you refer to and Bar Keeper's Friend works well for that.
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:17 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by HeadMistress View Post
Formaldyde evaporates quickly in the air, but:

"Formaldehyde – human and environmental poisonOne of the problems of formaldehyde is that products containing it slowly give off toxic vapors over time. For humans, inhaling atmospheric concentrations above 0.1 mg/kg can cause eye and mucous membrane irritation, breathing difficulties and headaches.
When in contact with the skin, it can cause irritation, burns and dermatitis, In large doses, formaldehyde can be lethal. The chemical is listed as a known human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
In many animals and birds, formaldehyde has the same effects as in humans when ingested or inhaled. It can also create reproductive problems such as low fertility. In an aquatic environment, formaldehyde is very and somewhat persistently toxic as it has a half life of between a day and ten days."

Chlorine, otoh, evaporates in water in 12-24 hours.

--Peggie
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't completely understand it yourself." --Albert Einstein
From the "Green Living Site" you referenced:

Some items common in your home and office that may contain formaldehyde include:

Car polish and cleaners
Air fresheners
Disinfectants
Polishes
Doors
Cleaning fluid
Paint
Furniture
Insulation batts
Ironing sprays and fluids
Particle board
Plywood veneer
Softwood products
Hair products
Synthetic upholstery
Old carpets (no longer used in carpet manufacture)
Smaller rugs
Glues
Sealants
Paints
Foam
Cosmetics


And from the American Chemistry Council:

"Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring substance produced by every living organism. Studies show that formaldehyde is readily biodegradable and does not accumulate in either the environment or in people. In the environment, formaldehyde is quickly broken down in the air by sunlight or by bacteria in soil or water."

So, I guess you can pick your source of information, but in general for chemical information, I lean towards chemists.
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Old 06-22-2018, 01:15 PM   #27
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I am on Peggie side on this one
I have worked with formaldehyde and it is nasty stuff even a little spill
Caused problems breathing and burning eyes if spilled.
Didn't kill anyone but just real uncomfortable but maybe in 20 years they will find it was dangerous. Just like asbestos.
3 years ago I switched to DMDM hydantoin which is a slow release formaldehyde .It safer and easier to handle.
Most Major manufactures are using it now but I would question anything made offshore
We use a 1000 kg tote every month its in Hand soap and dish soap
On the higher end cosmetics we use other preservatives that don't cause any skin sensitivity.
I would be carefull with store bought acid toilet bowl cleaner because most use rendered beef fat as a thickener and high concentration of hydrochloric acid This might cause a problem with your plumbing in your holding tank.
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Old 06-22-2018, 01:50 PM   #28
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Peggie, have you ever gone back and re-read your approach to a conversation, and thought about dialing it back a notch or two?

Consider this:

Never seem more learned than the people you are with. Wear your learning like a pocket watch and keep it hidden. Do not pull it out to count the hours, but give the time when you are asked.
Lord Chesterfield (1694 - 1773)

I've read Peggy's posts here twice looking for some semblance of hostility or condescending attitude. I've failed to find it.


What I can say is she has touched on is; The Truth Hurts

Some people don't like their failings being pointed out by someone, especially a woman. She's a 'fact of the matter' type person. Don't like her style or what she has to say? Then you probably shouldn't read her posts.



In all her posts that I've read on this board and others she posts on, I've found she is not always politically correct, but her knowledge on the subjects she expounds on is most excellent. She is informing and educating, not nurturing.



Although I'm 73, I can clearly remember that many of my teachers and college professors WERE NOT PC - obviously they never read Lord Chesterfield.


Quite frankly, I find his quote appropriate for the aristocracy of the time, but not applicable to modern day discourse.



Lets not forget that when Lord Chesterfield was postulating, women had no rights whatsoever - but were totally subservient. Witness Henry VIII.
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:04 PM   #29
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I am on Peggie side on this one
I have worked with formaldehyde and it is nasty stuff even a little spill
Caused problems breathing and burning eyes if spilled.
Didn't kill anyone but just real uncomfortable but maybe in 20 years they will find it was dangerous. Just like asbestos.
3 years ago I switched to DMDM hydantoin which is a slow release formaldehyde .It safer and easier to handle.
Most Major manufactures are using it now but I would question anything made offshore
We use a 1000 kg tote every month its in Hand soap and dish soap
On the higher end cosmetics we use other preservatives that don't cause any skin sensitivity.
I would be carefull with store bought acid toilet bowl cleaner because most use rendered beef fat as a thickener and high concentration of hydrochloric acid This might cause a problem with your plumbing in your holding tank.
That does look a lot safer. I see it is used in cosmetics, but am curious if you know whether it has the same sterilizing effect on e coli as non stabilized forms?
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:29 PM   #30
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Manufacturers of the chemicals do all the testing and we receive all literature We have had problems in the past with formaldehyde flashing off when heating product and we find that DMDM is not as prone doing this in the heating process.We use different upper end preservatives in a products like skin cream that is absorbed into the top layer of skin usually two types to cover a wider spectrum of bacterial growth.
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:38 PM   #31
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it has the same sterilizing effect on e coli as non stabilized forms
Not as fast but it lasts in the product longer which is better in my books
We don't have much chance of e coli contamination in this facility in Canada
.
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Old 06-22-2018, 03:45 PM   #32
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We also keep our boat in Little River SC, and as the OP said, the water is brackish and tea coloured. Our previous boat had the capability of using either "sea" water or fresh water to flush. We used sea water until we found that the salt was creating problems in the hoses and holding tank. Yes, it stained the toilet bowl too, but that was the least of the problems. We "solved" the problem by switching exclusively to fresh water.

Our present boat has no capability of using sea water to flush.
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Old 06-22-2018, 03:45 PM   #33
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Clean toilet bowls and kills holding tank smells instantly

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Originally Posted by Capt. Sea Fever View Post
We keep our boat on the Little River near the SC/NC line.
Here the ICW water is tea-colored due to the up stream vegetation.
This water leaves a brownish stain in the bowls.
Any safe way to clean these!
Thanks as always!
Capt. Sea Fever
Look for Zaal toilet bowl cleaner on the internet. Not only does it work, but it cleans the calcium build up in the pipes. If you cant find any locally let me know and I can send some down from Canada. Hopefully they will not think I am smuggling shoes!!
Also for holding tank smells use NOFLEX (also from Zaal). It works and kills smells in seconds then liquefies everything in the tank. Leave it over night and what was in your tank turns to almost clear water by morning. Its the bottom sludge that never gets pumped out that smells, plus if you have a level indicator that has stopped working it will probably fix that too.
Every product they do is environmentally friendly
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Old 06-22-2018, 03:49 PM   #34
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I used some NOFLEX the other day and was surprised at how white the toilet bowl got that I used it again with more water and a brush. Cleanest head ever!!!!
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Old 06-22-2018, 05:28 PM   #35
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If you like replacing joker valves don’t you? If I am right then keep pouring that bleach and keep running it through your system. True, bleach will clean up your toilets but there are side effects.
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Old 06-22-2018, 06:43 PM   #36
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it has the same sterilizing effect on e coli as non stabilized forms
Not as fast but it lasts in the product longer which is better in my books
We don't have much chance of e coli contamination in this facility in Canada
.
Thanks Sea Q. Sounds like a better option than TDX. I presume you use it industrially, but is there a consumer product, or just bulk?
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Old 06-22-2018, 08:52 PM   #37
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Delfin, you like replacing joker valves donít you? If I am right then keep pouring that bleach and keep running it through your system. True, bleach will clean up your toilets but there are side effects.
Since I don't use bleach, as usual, your post makes zero sense.
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Old 06-22-2018, 10:06 PM   #38
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Delfin I misread your OP, then changed my post within 15 min or so. Bad grammar on #15 true, but still true, bleach ruins joker valves. Your name was removed.. Soo sensitive....
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Old Yesterday, 08:47 AM   #39
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Thanks Sea Q. Sounds like a better option than TDX. I presume you use it industrially, but is there a consumer product, or just bulk?
We manufacture hand and dish soaps for a bunch of grocery chains about a million liters a month
Being doing it for about 35 years
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Old Today, 08:01 AM   #40
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Simple Cleaner- Vinegar

Hi- We're on the Ashley River in SC and have that same crappy (LOL) brown water! We use plain old vinegar once per week and a bowl brush to get rid of brown stains.
Was also told by a fellow yachty that it helps eliminate the "boat smells" from your holding tank. We're 12 years aboard and have no odors.
Good luck!
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