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Old 05-31-2015, 09:42 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I think the usual practice is to run a line into an area where the loop is high enough, such as a locker of behind interior liners, etc.

Sometimes it takes an absurdly long line.

I have seen rules of thumb for the height required to not require a loop....and many say 12 inches (which for many coastal power boats would probably be enough unless you love rough seas).

The "max heel" is usually geared for sailboats, but without a loop with siphon break there is always a chance of siphon induced flooding.
I do love handling a good boat in rough seas. Been a long time since. Always wanted to try it full-tilt-bogie by piloting one of the USCG search and rescue "rollover" vessels. What a gas it would be to have control of a boat that virtually could not be broken... sans getting too close to and in contact with shoals/rocks. Jus sayen!!
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Old 05-31-2015, 09:47 AM   #22
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Any boat can get broken and people hurt.

Nice if it's not your boat, not your responsibility and there's rescue resources standing by.

Not too many opportunities for all that.

Most of our boats aren't made for continued use or comfort in seas that keep burying thru hulls mounted well above the waterline.
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Old 05-31-2015, 10:56 AM   #23
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Art: Having trained at what is arguably the roughest bar in North America (Cape Disappointment, Columbia River Bar) on a USCG 44' mlb, self righting, self bailing, I can certainly tell you it is a RUSH! Of course "full bogie" in a 44 is about 12 kts, when you're crossing the ever changing bar, with the 9 kt current of the Columbia fighting against an incoming tide, the feeling can't be beat and I'll be forever thankful that I had the opportunity to do it multiple times.......that being said, I really don't ever want to try it in MY boat except in the calmest weather lol. But, back then in the CG the motto was "You have to go out, you don't have to come back." According to my son who is currently in the CG, that has been changed and they do a danger/likelihood of rescue assessment before they commit. Hmmmmm.
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Old 05-31-2015, 11:09 AM   #24
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Check yer bilge pumps!

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Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
I agree no check-valves in bilge pump line, but if the thruhull is well above the waterline, why would you need and anti syphon loop at all..?

Larry (post #10) defines our particular problem quite well: the pump will cycle on and off as the water in the line goes back into the small bilge if we use the vented loop solution. A smaller secondary pump with a narrow line might work but the bilge would be very crowded. I'm not sure there is room. Larry: Thoughts?


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Old 05-31-2015, 12:33 PM   #25
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See post 13, that type of pump should eliminate drain back...but hardly adds to emergency pumping capacity.

There are also tiny micro pump systems to keep bilges very dry.
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Old 05-31-2015, 12:43 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDCAVE View Post
Larry (post #10) defines our particular problem quite well: the pump will cycle on and off as the water in the line goes back into the small bilge if we use the vented loop solution. A smaller secondary pump with a narrow line might work but the bilge would be very crowded. I'm not sure there is room. Larry: Thoughts?


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Have you looked at the turn on / turn off height differentiation of various switches? And some are much more prone to getting re-triggered by wash back than others. I had this issue in my aft bilge as well as in a heavily used shower sump; I installed Ultra Pumpswitches and voila the problem was gone.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:42 PM   #27
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One could easily create a shop vac based bilge emptier if you wanted to keep it really dry. Another method is have a blower hose aiming there and evaporate faster than the drips. I was able to keep a 1952 Chris craft cruiser bilge dry with a blower fan sometimes.
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Old 06-05-2015, 11:56 AM   #28
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I use one of the Jabsco diaphragm pumps PSNeeld suggested. I don't have a deep bilge like your KK but i,'ll bet it would do the job .
The pump itself can be mounted elsewhere with only the hose and a bronze hose end mount strainer dropped into the water. These pumps will suck the water, priming easily, and are able to lift the water a good distance. Little runback, only that water which is in the suction side hose. The remaining water will not run back like a centrifugal.
As mentioned they are are not intended for flooding control but will do a good job, or should do, of dewatering normal bilge water accumulation.
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