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Old 06-23-2015, 12:47 PM   #21
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not all windows are exactly vertical. for that reason my blinds ride on SS wires strung through the cord holes from the top and screwed to the bottom frame. No rattling, stay in place at mid points
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Old 06-23-2015, 01:05 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I guess I'm going to be the "doubting Thomas" in this thread but, for the life of me, I don't see how blinds inside the boat keep the heat out! I know they keep the sun light at bay & provide privacy but since the blinds are in the boat, isn't the heat already in the boat when the sun comes through the windows? I have blinds on my boat but when I hold my hand up to them on a sunny day, I can still feel significant heat. Low E-glass or tinted windows seem to be a better solution to the problem. My windshield is covered by Sunbrella and my salon sliding doors are tinted. Even with direct sun on the sliding doors, not much heat can be felt.
Even energy efficient windows still allow energy transmission. One problem we have with our house is the west facing walls heat up in the summer. There are two rooms, both the same size, on the same wall with equal sized glass doors on that wall. One door has energy efficient blinds. One does not. The room without blinds is much hotter and the room heats up our house which is not a good thing.

The blinds do have an R value as well as being light colored to reflect the sun light from entering the house and warming up the floor. It really does make a difference. A shade covering on the outside of the window will certainly work and this is an age old solution for Southern homes but the blinds R value also helps. Shading the windows on the outside AND having interior energy efficient blinds would be the best solution.

The blinds will work better if they are IN the window casement. That certainly is not going to happen on all/many boat windows.

Our house has passive solar design features. The roof overhang is a certain size that blocks the summer sun from entering the southern facing windows while allowing fall, winter, and spring sun to enter those windows. The sun enters the windows and warms up the furniture and finished concrete floor helps heat the house. The house's concrete floor is a huge heat sink that helps moderate the house temperature. The slab is heated mainly from the sunlight hitting the floor.

When the house was being built, I measured room temperature on the south and north sides of the house. There was a five degree difference in the south facing rooms due to solar heat gain.

Later,
Dan
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Old 06-23-2015, 02:36 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I guess I'm going to be the "doubting Thomas" in this thread but, for the life of me, I don't see how blinds inside the boat keep the heat out! I know they keep the sun light at bay & provide privacy but since the blinds are in the boat, isn't the heat already in the boat when the sun comes through the windows? I have blinds on my boat but when I hold my hand up to them on a sunny day, I can still feel significant heat. Low E-glass or tinted windows seem to be a better solution to the problem. My windshield is covered by Sunbrella and my salon sliding doors are tinted. Even with direct sun on the sliding doors, not much heat can be felt.
I agree with you, I think once the sunlight is through the glass, most of the heat is already in the boat/house. If you recall the old-old Landcruisers? They had a double roof with a 3/4" space between, the wind blew through the space and carried the heat off. If blinds were on the outside, in theory they might do the same. Inside, some heat is reflected back but most, I think, wafts up between the blind & the glass.
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Old 06-23-2015, 04:47 PM   #24
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What is the best way to keep them from rattling with boat movement?
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I opted against installing the little retaining clips to hold the bottom rail steady. When we're underway or at anchor at night, we raise the blinds and wrap the cord in the end to prevent noise.
Mini-blinds here, on 3 sides....We always have ours up when underway too, but do have the little retaining clips to keep them quiet when at anchor or when dropped...

Some of our clips were broken when we bought the boat, but replacements are easily available at Lowes..

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Old 06-23-2015, 04:58 PM   #25
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:36 PM   #26
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This was a great add to the boat this year. We got rid of the curtains for the large windows. These are online Hunter Douglas knockoffs, half the price. http://www.selectblinds.com/sheershades/roomdarkening-sheer-shades.html

The magnet at the bottom holds the blinds in place when down. They roll up and are out of the way in the valance.
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:49 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I guess I'm going to be the "doubting Thomas" in this thread but, for the life of me, I don't see how blinds inside the boat keep the heat out! I know they keep the sun light at bay & provide privacy but since the blinds are in the boat, isn't the heat already in the boat when the sun comes through the windows? I have blinds on my boat but when I hold my hand up to them on a sunny day, I can still feel significant heat. Low E-glass or tinted windows seem to be a better solution to the problem. My windshield is covered by Sunbrella and my salon sliding doors are tinted. Even with direct sun on the sliding doors, not much heat can be felt.
The reason very light colored or reflective blinds keep heat out has to do with how the heat is trapped inside. Glass transmits light very well, but when that sunlight hits an object inside the boat it warms that item. That item then radiates the heat as infrared light which does NOT go through glass very well. So if you can reflect the light out before it warms interior items you can keep a lot of the heat from being trapped inside.

Ken
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Old 06-23-2015, 07:34 PM   #28
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If you recall the old-old Landcruisers? They had a double roof with a 3/4" space between, the wind blew through the space and carried the heat off. .

It was called a Tropical Roof and Toyota stole the idea from Rover who created it for the Land Rover back in the late 1940s. I ordered my Land Rover with a Tropical Roof back in 1973 when I lived in Hawaii and I can tell you that it works as advertised. The theory is very simple, as Rover explained in their booklet on off-road expedition driving that came with the Land Rover in those days--- it keeps the main roof in the shade. It works, wind or no wind.

Even parked in direct sun all day, the inside would be stuffy when I climbed in at the end of the day but it was never baking hot as everybody else's cars were. Photo is my Series III Model 88.

Also, I completely agree with psneeld's post #19 regarding the effect of blinds on interior heat. We've had a boat with Ventian blinds now for 17 years and I can tell you that on sunny days they have a very noticeable effect on reducing heat inside the boat when the sun is beating on the windows for exactly the reasons psneeld states.

We have come back to the boat on hot summer days and the inside of the cabin has been very warm with the blinds up. We lower and close the blinds on the sunny side of the boat and almost immediately we begin to notice a reduction of the temperature inside the boat.

And we're not the only ones who notice it. A previous owner mounted a brass mercury thermometer in the main cabin on the edge of the magazine rack attached to the backside of the the galley cabinet. So it's almost in the middle of the main cabin. We've noted the inside temperature when the cabin's been hot with the blinds up and then again a half hour or so after lowering and closing the blinds on the sunny side. I don't recall the exact change, but it was measurably cooler.

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Old 06-26-2015, 11:13 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I guess I'm going to be the "doubting Thomas" in this thread but, for the life of me, I don't see how blinds inside the boat keep the heat out! I know they keep the sun light at bay & provide privacy but since the blinds are in the boat, isn't the heat already in the boat when the sun comes through the windows? I have blinds on my boat but when I hold my hand up to them on a sunny day, I can still feel significant heat. Low E-glass or tinted windows seem to be a better solution to the problem. My windshield is covered by Sunbrella and my salon sliding doors are tinted. Even with direct sun on the sliding doors, not much heat can be felt.

I'm with you. Great looking rig you have too btw.


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Old 06-26-2015, 12:31 PM   #30
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Blinds work to reduce interior heat on boats for the exact same reason those collapsible windshield shades work inside the windshields of vehicles. Anything that's reflects the sun back out reduces the heat inside.
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Old 06-26-2015, 12:50 PM   #31
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I agree with you, I think once the sunlight is through the glass, most of the heat is already in the boat/house....... Inside, some heat is reflected back but most, I think, wafts up between the blind & the glass.
There's an engineer in my marina who has done significant testing on the problem. (Recording thermometers and the like.) His conclusions mirror what Brooksie just posted.

I must say that I do like the Hunter-Douglas knockoffs that some others have posted.
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:01 PM   #32
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The blinds will work better if they are IN the window casement. That certainly is not going to happen on all/many boat windows.
I agree and have Pella windows in my house. The windows and doors have 3 panes of glass....double glass (e-glass and thermal) and a pane that houses the blinds. (No dusting necessary) The interior pane is hinged and does open for cleaning by the occasional resident who suffers fro OCD. IMO, however, it is not needed. (The cleaning, that is!)
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Old 06-26-2015, 01:44 PM   #33
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For heat reduction, we use the belt and suspenders approach. We snap on our sunscreens to the outside of the windows and drop the blinds on the inside. It limits the amount of sunlight/heat hitting the glass on the outside and reflects/blocks from the inside. Add a bit of air moving through the cabin from fans or our breeze booster hatch scoop and it's nearly comfortable.

Next month I'll break out my bucket swamp cooler I put together last fall. I haven't used it on the boat yet, but the dry summer heat of the CA Delta should be the perfect place to try it out. Last year in my hot garage, it cooled the 95*F air by about 20*F.

Welcome to the redneck Yacht Club!!





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Old 06-26-2015, 03:03 PM   #34
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Blinds work to reduce interior heat on boats for the exact same reason those collapsible windshield shades work inside the windshields of vehicles. Anything that's reflects the sun back out reduces the heat inside.
That is a very good comparison. I have used sun shields for years in my cars and the best sun shiel is the current one that has a shinny, reflective foil that reflects the sun light. When there is no threat of rain, I crack the windows to allow the heat to escape which also helps greatly. The heat buildup of the interior makes the AC work harder so any way to decrease the interior mass from heating up is a good thing.

In our passive solar house, we want that heat build up in the winter but not the summer. The roof overhangs prevent the summer sun from getting in the house except of the west side of the house. We have a carpet on the floor to minimize heat build up but the house is much hotter because of sunlight entering the house from the windows in two French doors.

I wonder....

Would the wife allow me to fit reflective foil to the windows in question?



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Old 06-26-2015, 03:23 PM   #35
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I have blinds mounted inside on my boat. I have a lot of glass and the blinds make a large difference in temps inside. The blinds fold up nicely while underway.
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Old 06-26-2015, 04:08 PM   #36
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Love our Hunter Douglas shades. We also just upgraded our old, sunburned, black Phifertex mesh windshield cover with a new Phifertex Plus black cover. The heat transfer difference is tremendous - even though the cover is still black. The "Plus" has a 90-95% shade factor, as opposed to regular Phifertex with its 70% shade factor. In fact, we liked it so much that we had velcro-on Phifertex Plus white covers made for the west-facing side of the aft deck enclosure. Here in South Florida, everyday from May through September, our back deck was unusable in the late afternoon - even with the AC cranked up out there it was way too hot to sit. With the new mesh - in spite of the fact that it is on the INSIDE of the isinglas, we can keep the temp down to the low 80s all afternoon and evening. Looks great too, I think!
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Old 07-02-2015, 09:52 PM   #37
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I am considering doing something like this...but putting them on the outside of the window. In agreement with Codger regarding heat. It needs to be outside of the boat to really affect heat in boat.
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Old 07-03-2015, 08:46 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
I guess I'm going to be the "doubting Thomas" in this thread but, for the life of me, I don't see how blinds inside the boat keep the heat out! I know they keep the sun light at bay & provide privacy but since the blinds are in the boat, isn't the heat already in the boat when the sun comes through the windows? I have blinds on my boat but when I hold my hand up to them on a sunny day, I can still feel significant heat. Low E-glass or tinted windows seem to be a better solution to the problem. My windshield is covered by Sunbrella and my salon sliding doors are tinted. Even with direct sun on the sliding doors, not much heat can be felt.

We have tinted front and side windows, and inside mini-blinds along the saloon sides. When the blinds are closed on the "sunny side of the boat" I can easily feel a noticeable difference in temps a) just inside the blinds, and even more b) in between blinds and window glass.

Ambient temps throughout the saloon are noticeably lower than temps just inside the blinds.

-Chris
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