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Old 11-19-2012, 05:02 PM   #1
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Aqualarm Wet Exhaust Overheat Alarm

I am thinking of buying one of these (the twin model for two engines) and wonder if anyone may have some experience with them, either good or bad. It looks simple to install and the price is reasonable. But before spending $110+ it would be nice to hear from someone that has one or knows about them

John
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Old 11-19-2012, 05:22 PM   #2
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I have the Aqua alarm system on the oldboat. With the fire bell. I like that the bell is very loud , loud enough for folk in the marina to notice.

High water alarms and such just seem like such a good idea on a boat.

I have had no issues with this system.
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Old 11-19-2012, 05:23 PM   #3
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John: The previous owner put this on our SP135. It's a bi-metal snap disk thermostat and it's wired into the same alarm as the low oil/high temp system on Hobo. You could make one for ~$25.00
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
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John: The previous owner put this on our SP135. It's a bi-metal snap disk thermostat and it's wired into the same alarm as the low oil/high temp system on Hobo. You could make one for ~$25.00

Thanks for posting this. Our boat also has a hi temp/low oil pressure alarm, but this would be a useful, low buck addition. Wonder how the temp setting for the switch was selected? (I have one of those temperature guns from Harbor Freight...maybe a high power run to establish max normal operating temp???) Do you have the manufacturer and part number of the switch (couldn't quite make it out on from the photo)? Any chance you could explain the wiring?
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:57 AM   #5
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I have one that's been disabled for years. On one of my cruises, it started making noises, like stray current was getting to the alarm. It became irritating so I had to disconnect it. Could very well be my boat though...never spent that much time troubleshooting it.
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:53 AM   #6
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They work.
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Old 11-20-2012, 06:33 AM   #7
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I didn't even know they had an overheat alarm but I'm a believer in their "raw water flow detector" which will react faster than any temperature alarm.
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:19 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by skidgear View Post
Thanks for posting this. Our boat also has a hi temp/low oil pressure alarm, but this would be a useful, low buck addition. Wonder how the temp setting for the switch was selected? (I have one of those temperature guns from Harbor Freight...maybe a high power run to establish max normal operating temp???) Do you have the manufacturer and part number of the switch (couldn't quite make it out on from the photo)? Any chance you could explain the wiring?
The thermodisc is part number: T-O-D 60T13, F150-20F, with 150 degree cut in temperature and a 20 degree temp differential.

I checked my wiring and I believe this is how it's wired. One wire to the block and and one to the oil pressure alarm. The disk closes on temperature and goes to ground to sound the alarm.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:59 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
The thermodisc is part number: T-O-D 60T13, F150-20F, with 150 degree cut in temperature and a 20 degree temp differential.

I checked my wiring and I believe this is how it's wired. One wire to the block and and one to the oil pressure alarm. The disk closes on temperature and goes to ground to sound the alarm.
From what the Therm O Disc site says the circuit is closed up to 150 and opens at 150 Close again at anything below 115. So the circuit is supplying a Grd to the oil pressure switch the same as the as the oil pressure does switch. Not sure how that would work unless the Grd to the oil indicator was interrupted by this sensor as well.

In any case here is a site that has 33 of them for $4.00 each.

Surplus City Liquidators

Here is a complete kit for $65 including the sensor, strap for exhaust and a monitor panel with grenn indicator for power and red light / audiable as alarm. Sounds like a deal with some simple labor on our part.

http://www.aqualarm.net/comerus/stor...p?idProduct=64
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:14 AM   #10
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JD wote:

"From what the Therm O Disc site says the circuit is closed up to 150 and opens at 150"

The unit that I originally asked about (Aqualarm) closes at 200 degrees according to the specs. Seems to me that 150 might be just a tad low, with the possibility of some false alarms from time to time. But I could be wrong about that. :-)

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Old 11-20-2012, 10:14 AM   #11
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A raw water exhaust temperature alarm is one of the most valuable engine alarms for a cruising vessel. There are a few alternatives and I'm sure the Aqualarm is fine, but take a look also at Borel's solution; these have been favourably reviewed in PassageMaker. I have them installed on both engines and the genset. Welcome to Borel Manufacturing
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:19 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
The thermodisc is part number: T-O-D 60T13, F150-20F, with 150 degree cut in temperature and a 20 degree temp differential.

I checked my wiring and I believe this is how it's wired. One wire to the block and and one to the oil pressure alarm. The disk closes on temperature and goes to ground to sound the alarm.
Thanks, again, Larry.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:22 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by jwnall View Post
JD wote:

"From what the Therm O Disc site says the circuit is closed up to 150 and opens at 150"

The unit that I originally asked about (Aqualarm) closes at 200 degrees according to the specs. Seems to me that 150 might be just a tad low, with the possibility of some false alarms from time to time. But I could be wrong about that. :-)

John
I agree, 200* is probably a good temp. I was responding to the one sighted not recommending 150*.

The Borel at twice the price uses 175* compared to the Aqua alarm. But I'm sure 200* would be plenty of time for one to react.

But before or at least at the same time I got to get around to drilling out and tapping my exhaust gas temp sensor. I think this is as or more important than the water temp. A lot more long term effects from too high or low exhaust gas temps.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:29 AM   #14
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The issue with the snap on temperature senders vs water flow detection is "time to get signal" I've got about 10 aquastats on by boat for hydronic heating and they are "slow." Low/no flow detection costs more but is my preference as it gives you an alarm before (some say about two minutes) the exit piping temperature hits the trigger point.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:38 AM   #15
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Aquabelle wrote:

"There are a few alternatives and I'm sure the Aqualarm is fine, but take a look also at Borel's solution; these have been favourably reviewed in PassageMaker. I have them installed on both engines and the genset. Welcome to Borel Manufacturing"

Thanks for that info, and I will most definitely take a look at Borel also, since you have that system installed and like it. I'm not at all wedded to Aqualarm, but it was what came up when I began looking for such a system. Lord, if only I had had an alarm system installed when my engine overheated at Clearwater! Would have saved me $2,000 in labor/parts in getting the engine running again, and countless hours of dirty, greasy work trying to get the soot cleaned from everything. Not to mention little problems that keep cropping up, such as miscellaneous electrical parts failing (probably due to the wires overheating).

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Old 11-20-2012, 10:41 AM   #16
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Sunchaser wrote:

" Low/no flow detection costs more but is my preference as it gives you an alarm before (some say about two minutes) the exit piping temperature hits the trigger point."

I'm not sure what you mean by "low/no flow detection." Would you be willing to give a few more details on how you do that??

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Old 11-20-2012, 11:03 AM   #17
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John

Google Livorsi. They make units specific for boats. In industry, fluid flow measurement has existed for decades for all types of fluids and flow rates. They can get expensive for us little guys but cheap for the big engined yachts and freighters.
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Old 11-20-2012, 11:31 AM   #18
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Just a good discussion of Aqualarm under power systems, EGT Prekins 6.354
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