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Old 12-29-2015, 04:32 PM   #41
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AC drain idea

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Originally Posted by LongJohn View Post
I've used the Water bed drain kit for several projects. Mine would handle 3-4 gpm on the forced side with ease but low flows would not always establish any appreciable lift on the suction side.

Any idea what the flow is on an AC raw water cooling system ?
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Old 12-29-2015, 06:50 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
Any idea what the flow is on an AC raw water cooling system ?
When I've run cleaner through my coils using my current 8.17 GPM (490 GPH/60) March pump, I've never measured it but the way it initially fills the bucket must be about 5 gal. per minute through a Cruiseair 16K BTU unit that is pretty old and might have some restrictions. That's with 5/8" lines and a fresh pump.
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Old 12-29-2015, 07:45 PM   #43
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Cool. Thanks Larry.
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Old 12-29-2015, 08:04 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
Any idea what the flow is on an AC raw water cooling system ?

System Capacity(Btu/hr) Seawater Flow Rate(gph) Inlet Size
5,000-12,000 250 Ĺ"
16,000-24,000 500 ĺ"
30,000-48,000 1,000 1"
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Old 12-30-2015, 05:57 AM   #45
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What was wrong with a standard condensate pump?

For $50-$80, it has a catch basin, pump and float switch. You route the drain tube into the basin, and when it fills to the switch level, the pump cuts on and pumps it out. They have 10+ foot head on most pumps. Run the drain through an anti-siphon valve and into some existing line (like sink drain).
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Old 12-30-2015, 02:26 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by stubones99 View Post
What was wrong with a standard condensate pump?

For $50-$80, it has a catch basin, pump and float switch. You route the drain tube into the basin, and when it fills to the switch level, the pump cuts on and pumps it out. They have 10+ foot head on most pumps. Run the drain through an anti-siphon valve and into some existing line (like sink drain).
There's no need for an anti siphon valve when joining two waste lines. There's no chance of cross contamination.

I've never seen a standard condensate pump but surely that would work if it's what I think it is.
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Old 12-30-2015, 02:59 PM   #47
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You need an anti-siphon loop if the discharge is underwater (permanently or for long temporary periods such as a sailboat on a long tack) and the open source is below the waterline....such as a centrifugal bilge pump in a shower sump.

Has more to do with siphoning than cross contamination.

In this case the opening to the sink is the anti-siphon opening. Would only be an issue maybe if you had it stoppered and full of water so it was airtight.
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Old 12-30-2015, 03:32 PM   #48
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By far, the most trouble free method of draining AC condensate is by gravity directly overboard. I have never had a problem with mine.

I would agree with you if that was possible on my boat the forward unit is below the waterline. That would possibly work on the unit under the Solon floor but I've always avoided drilling holes in the hull.


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Old 12-30-2015, 04:19 PM   #49
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Check out this link:

http://www.amazon.com/Little-Giant-V.../dp/B000CCMUCM

If you look at the add-on items, there is a check-valve to prevent back-flow to the condensate pump. As long as there is a bit of bleach added occasionally to the water, I doubt the valve would stop up.

Then run to the nearest sink drain and you'll have a drain with no extra holes.
The valve would also prevent the line draining back into the pump basin as well.

The only thing better would be a 12vdc version, which I've never seen. I have seen the condensate pumps in numerous AC installs where there is no clear shot outside with a down-hill slope.
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