Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-04-2012, 07:54 PM   #1
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,080
Working from home,errrr boat questions.

How many people work from their boat and what do you do?I am currently doing some affiliate work,blogs,and soon hope to get into writing short e stories and possibly ebooks.Is their any other ideas or things to do while cruising?I'd like to live aboard in 10 years,if my healths improves.Hoping to do the Great Loop in about 4 or 5 years.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2012, 11:05 AM   #2
Guru
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Anastasia III
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,716
I live on and work from my boat. I'm in sales, so I combine telemarketing with outside sales and hardly ever go into the "office".
__________________

Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2012, 06:13 PM   #3
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Ben, I don't live aboard, but do extended cruising. Since I am still active in business, I do a lot of office work on the boat. I have a custom built fold out desk in the side (guest) stateroom. Extra electric receptacles were installed. Even a remote mic for the VHF. With notebook computer, aircard, WIFI, portable printer, and utilizing some shore side business facilities I can do almost anything that can be done in my land office.

My business is nothing like you describe as I am a real estate developer and builder. We regularly e-mail document files, drawing files, financial report files, and job status reports. We have done closings during cruises. Over night delivery by Fedex is a great thing.

One of the more complicated things we do is the bonding of projects. Much information is sent back and forth. I did one large project while cruising. We started out with it in Jekyll Island, GA. We finished on the West coast of Florida at Boca Grande. When we had it all done, I asked the lady I had been working with to give me the info to wire the fee. She laughed and said that it had been a fun process. That she figures anybody that could do this while travelling on a boat was good for the money. Send it when I get back to the office.

When my late wife was undergoing treatments, we never stopped our cruising. We stopped at towns up and down the coast to get to labs for tests sending the reports back to her doctor. In fact, Lee County Sheriff Mike Scott took us to the hospital in Fort Myers for lab work. That was about 2 weeks before she passed away. Her doctor said that our continuing on as close to regular as possible probably added months to her life.

The point being that you can do much from a boat while living in one spot or cruising. It is very seldom that I will not have some work to do while on the boat. However, it makes working better.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2012, 07:38 PM   #4
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,877
3rd time living aboard...first 2 boats for a total of 6 years I was active duty/newly retired USCG (between marriages).

Now living aboard for 2nd year, work as an assistance tower for 8-9 months of the year and cruise south the other 3-4.

It's nice living 4 slips down from my place of employment!
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2012, 12:21 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Dswizzler's Avatar
 
City: LaPaz ,Mexico and the Sea of Cortez
Vessel Name: Delta Swizzler
Vessel Model: 1988 58' Vantare
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 215
Just finishing up mu 1st year living and working aboard. Working on Data Networking for HP, as long as I have a a internet connection, ( Hard line, wifi, air card) I can work from anywhere. Haven't been in my office in 6 months...come to think of it, haven't had on a pair of long pants or hard shoes for 6 months..WINNER
Dswizzler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2012, 12:41 PM   #6
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
If you are going to do the loop in 4 or 5 years, what is preventing you from living on the boat? With the right boat, marina and slip you can do everything you do on the dirt?

A boat has many hand hold and the distance/space is small so moving around in the boat an advantage, if disabled and/or health reasons. Plus the boat can be moved for a change in scenery/location. My wife was disabled for 3+ years, very seldom left the boat, but being the boat has many hand holds, few steps, and easy access it was a plus for her.

With the smart cell phone, note book/pad PC, and broad band/wifi I can do the majority of my office work from the boat, so my hours are flexible. My wife is retired, which is going to force me to retire in a couple of years, so the question is what am I going to do besides drive my wife crazier?
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2012, 02:09 PM   #7
Guru
 
Woodsong's Avatar
 
City: Atlanta
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,630
We don't live aboard full time but definitely part-time/seasonally. We probably average at least 120 nights a year aboard. This year will be way above that. I run my yacht brokerage firm out of my boat so it is truly my floating office. Give me my camera, macbook, scanner/printer, and a wifi connection and I can do just about anything I need to do. I have closed many a deal while anchored out in a quiet cove just using wifi/air card since so many of our closings are remotely done via electronic email, efax, and wire transfers. Switching to efax a year ago was a huge step forward to freeing me up- don't know why on earth I took so long to do that! Some of our clients aren't super big into email but can fax and efax goes to my macbook or iphone.
Woodsong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2012, 01:01 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
marinetrader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 301
I live aboard full time and work from my boat as a yacht broker. I can do everything via Verizon WIFI card.

Last week spent 4 days on the hook; I worked some there as well. Here is a link to my blog if you are interested.

The life......it can't be beat.
marinetrader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2012, 02:47 PM   #9
Guru


 
City: Full-time onboard
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Trawler
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 937
Needless to say, all of ActiveCaptain is run while onboard. For the last 9 years we've lived onboard for about 9+ months each year.
Jeffrey S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 10:06 AM   #10
Newbie
 
City: fambridge uk
Country: wickford
Vessel Name: mystique
Vessel Model: pearl motor cruiser
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2
we have been living on board our motor cruiser in the uk all summer and only go home once a week to get mail and check on teenage daughter.
its great and we hope to sell up and venture over to the us
__________________
Heather and Steve

www.coverdalegroup.co.uk
dabsolute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 10:20 AM   #11
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,629
I have started telecommuting but haven't made it to the boat yet. But I'm getting closer. Here's the view from my new office. Closer to the water, but not on it yet.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2012-08-20_16-03-37_659.jpg
Views:	104
Size:	196.0 KB
ID:	12487  
BaltimoreLurker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 03:26 PM   #12
Guru
 
Portuguese's Avatar
 
City: Salvador - BA
Country: Brazil
Vessel Name: Rainha Jannota
Vessel Model: Curruira 46
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 662
Send a message via MSN to Portuguese
I will rotate and consult about drilling oil businesses for another 2 years after Rainha is ready. 2015 is the dead line for good. After that no more work other than that imposed by common boat maintenance
Portuguese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2012, 06:15 PM   #13
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,080
Thanks for the feed back everyone.I'm going to go back and reread this again.I guess my thread got lost because I quit receiving emails letting me know I had responses.

Ok,here's where I am at.I've been out of work(unpaid) for six years due to health issues.I would really rather not have to rely on a brick and motor job.I'd rather find something that I can do from home or boat or where ever.I have a chance to go back to school.It will be at my local community college.I don't have all the info yet.I went down and got the info to get the process started.I am required to pay a $25 fee to cover registration and assessment testing.I kinda been outta school fur a while so dey wanna make sir I can still wead and rite.LOL After that,they will know what I need to take as far as catch up courses, for the lack of a better term, along with taking the classes to get the qualifications in a field of my choosing.There in lies the problem.I know where I want to be.I just don't know what I should get a degree in.Can you guys,and ladies, give me some ideas or a direction to help me make this decision?The one thing important to me is the ability to be able to work independently from where ever I may be.I do plan to take a refresher writing class.What would be an interesting field to get into?
__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 12:26 AM   #14
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaltimoreLurker View Post
I have started telecommuting but haven't made it to the boat yet. But I'm getting closer. Here's the view from my new office. Closer to the water, but not on it yet.
Looks nice Darrell. Actually that view could very well have been from one of the islands in out Moreton Bay...

Good plan Portuguese. (Rainha)

Sorry, can't help you there Ben. Very personal decision, that. Only you know what your aptitudes are.
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 07:32 AM   #15
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Looks nice Darrell. Actually that view could very well have been from one of the islands in out Moreton Bay...

Good plan Portuguese. (Rainha)

Sorry, can't help you there Ben. Very personal decision, that. Only you know what your aptitudes are.

I think this is going to be a difficult but fun project.I have always been some what of a hands on blue collar work.I guess anything I can do on the move would make me a white collar worker.Never been on the dark side before.
__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 02:18 PM   #16
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Most liveaboard blue collar cruisers that I know are in the construction industry. They follow the work.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 02:30 PM   #17
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Most liveaboard blue collar cruisers that I know are in the construction industry. They follow the work.

Not quite what my back ground is in.Anything possible tho.My back ground is in industrial mechanics,auto mechanics,motorcycle mechanics,manual machining,upholstery,aviation line service(ramp rat),and I was going for my commercial pilots cert.I have some electrical,plumbing,warehousing,forklift operator,and material handling.For a few years I worked for a lady friend at her temp agency.I filled in for people so I got a lot of experience in many different fields.To bad none of it can be done from a boat.Well,maybe some.i have some experience working on I/Os and OBs.Not enough to go diving into them as a primary source of income.
__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 03:11 PM   #18
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
Not quite what my back ground is in.Anything possible tho.My back ground is in industrial mechanics,auto mechanics,motorcycle mechanics,manual machining,upholstery,aviation line service(ramp rat),and I was going for my commercial pilots cert.I have some electrical,plumbing,warehousing,forklift operator,and material handling.For a few years I worked for a lady friend at her temp agency.I filled in for people so I got a lot of experience in many different fields.To bad none of it can be done from a boat.Well,maybe some.i have some experience working on I/Os and OBs.Not enough to go diving into them as a primary source of income.
Good luck thinking you can write articles...etc.. those guys are a dime a dozen...and many are good writers but don't have the wide background to appeal to the mags. Been there and done that and my resume' is pretty impressive in both USCG/boating/management/repair arena with an in to the mags that appeal to my skills such as Passagemaker. I was asked at one point to write the West Marine Advisor articles for their catalog.

Blue collar skills are always welcome along the oad...catch as catch can....nothing that you can count on but so much of the marine/boating industry is so screwed up you can weasel in along the way....just nothing predictable.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 03:30 PM   #19
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
Not enough to go diving into them as a primary source of income.
How about diving? Cleaning bottoms that is.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 04:42 PM   #20
Guru


 
City: Full-time onboard
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Trawler
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 937
I believe the following is a recipe for making money while cruising. It won't work for everyone but it's a model that you can use to create a long-living business on the water and even involving boating.

I've been building companies and products and selling services for my entire career. The moment you step onto your boat and cut the lines the opportunity to "touch" vast numbers of customers reduces - if you need to physically be in contact with them. So businesses onboard and cruising need to find a way to generate a lot of money from the single few prospects or they need to find a way to not have to "touch" the customer. The internet provides the latter solution.

Now I'm not saying that having a service business while cruising is bad. It can easily generate money. But it sure will take a lot of effort because you'll need to make contact with a lot of people to get a few sales. And since the point of cruising is to go out and explore, you're constantly in an environment of explaining what you do individually to other boaters you happen to come into contact with. That's really tough.

If you have a business that is internet-based, you have as much access to the millions of people you'd like to reach as easily as anyone in an office in Manhattan. You'll need internet access and that will limit some cruising areas - it's hard to do a 19 day crossing and run an internet business for example. Still, coastal cruising including the Bahamas and Caribbean is certainly possible. I'm sure PNW cruising will work too although internet might be more spotty.

Here's the easiest model for creating an internet business while cruising:

1. Find something you know a lot about. It's especially appropriate if it's something that cruisers would want - watermakers, chartplotters, anchors, inverters, LED lighting, holding tank vents, hose materials, sealants...it doesn't matter what the subject is.

2. Pick your mountain top and be THE expert in it. Create a web site that is the be-all information source on that one subject. Part of the subject selection process is looking around to make sure you can be THE site.

3. Don't write articles at first for others - write them for your own site. Write lots of them on every aspect of your subject area.

4. Have a place on the web site where you sell the products you talk about. One mistake people make here is to change the articles and information presented on the site based on the products they actually sell. That's a sure way to slit your throat in the short term. Be honest about the products you sell and be 100% truthful about the articles you write - even if it makes a product you sell look less than perfect.

5. Set up relationships with distributors who can drop ship their products directly to the customer. No inventory, no stocking, no return handling, etc. This will reduce your possible profit but a lot of this economic engine is just going to run without you having to touch it. This won't be without hassles. Every business has hassles.


A couple of major, odd things about this that are different from almost every other business and model - something the internet tends to produce:

- Your customer is the person who comes to your site to read your material. That customer might never buy anything from you. It is his needs you have to serve though. If you concentrate only on the people who buy from you, you'll lose the real marketing advantage of attracting large numbers of people. This is a very backwards way of looking at a "store". Most stores hate tire kickers. You have to love them.

- You pretty much have to know web site technologies to make this happen. If you have to pay someone every time you need to make a small change, you're going to eat up all of your profits. Learning html, css, shopping carts, etc. might seem like a lot. There are vast resources and to be honest, it's really not that hard if you have an open mind about it. Think about all of the thousands of web sites you've run across - the people running them aren't all experienced software developers.

- It takes time. It's not going to be like that UPS ad from a few years ago where the website goes public and the counter starts flying with the number of customers served. Any business worth anything doesn't succeed overnight. It takes investment and continuous effort. For most internet businesses like I've described, the investment is your time. Every business requires time or money.


We are full-time cruisers. We've been operating under this model for a few years. We decided in 2006 that the world was going to change from paper guidebooks (that we used and understood very well) to electronic guidebooks. I'm a software developer so our model is slightly different than I described above but it is very similar. Our primary mountain top is that guidebook type of cruising and planning information and the integration and capabilities it can provide. We have a secondary mountain top about mobile phones. See our 18-part article series about using mobile phones on boats - six hundred thousand people have read them. The series was the first ever recipient of a web-based Boat Writers International award. Today magazines come to us looking for information about electronic cruising guides and mobile phones on boats. My point isn't to blow our horn - it's to prove that this marketing technique works with zero budget: (1) be THE expert, and (2) stick with it. Do that and the media (and customers) will come running to you, even if you're on a boat. Heck, especially if you're on a boat - it makes for a better story.
__________________

Jeffrey S is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
great loop, living aboard, work

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012